umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Karlsson Wirebring, Linnea
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Stillesjö, S., Eriksson, J., Juslin, P. & Nyberg, L. (2018). A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 12, Article ID 481.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Similarity-Based Process for Human Judgment in the Parietal Cortex
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One important distinction in psychology is between inferences based on associative memory and inferences based on analysis and rules. Much previous empirical work conceive of associative and analytical processes as two exclusive ways of addressing a judgment task, where only one process is selected and engaged at a time, in an either-or fashion. However, related work indicate that the processes are better understood as being in interplay and simultaneously engaged. Based on computational modeling and brain imaging of spontaneously adopted judgment strategies together with analyses of brain activity elicited in tasks where participants were explicitly instructed to perform similarity-based associative judgments or rule-based judgments (n = 74), we identified brain regions related to the two types of processes. We observed considerable overlap in activity patterns. The precuneus was activated for both types of judgments, and its activity predicted how well a similarity-based model fit the judgments. Activity in the superior frontal gyrus predicted the fit of a rule-based judgment model. The results suggest the precuneus as a key node for similarity-based judgments, engaged both when overt responses are guided by similarity-based and rule-based processes. These results are interpreted such that similarity-based processes are engaged in parallel to rule-based-processes, a finding with direct implications for cognitive theories of judgment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
judgment and decision-making, fMRI, exemplar model, multiple-cue judgment, cognitive model
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154869 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2018.00481 (DOI)000453235900001 ()2-s2.0-85058995922 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Lövgren, A., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Häggman-Henrikson, B. & Wänman, A. (2018). Decision-making in dentistry related to temporomandibular disorders: a 5-yr follow-up study. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 126(6), 493-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-making in dentistry related to temporomandibular disorders: a 5-yr follow-up study
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are common, but many patients with such disorders go undetected and under-treated. Our aim was to evaluate the outcome of using a screening tool (5 yr after it was first implemented), on the clinical decision-making for patients with TMDs. Adults who attended for a dental check-up at the Public Dental Health Services in Västerbotten, Sweden, answered three screening questions (3Q/TMD) on frequent jaw pain, pain on jaw function, and catching/locking of the jaw. The dental records of a random sample of 200 individuals with at least one positive response to 3Q/TMD (3Q screen-positive patients) and 200 individuals with all negative responses (3Q screen-negative patients) were reviewed for TMD-related treatment decisions. A clinical decision related to TMD was absent in 45.5% of 3Q screen-positive patients. Treatment of TMDs was associated with a positive response to the screening question on jaw pain (OR = 6.7, 95% CI: 3.2-14.0) and was more frequent among 3Q screen-positive patients (24%) than among 3Q screen-negative patients (2%; OR = 15.5, 95% CI: 5.5-43.9), just as a female examiner was associated with more frequent treatment of TMDs (OR = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.4). The results indicate under-treatment of TMD within general dental practice and that male clinicians are less likely to initiate TMD treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
clinical decision-making, facial pain, prospective study, temporomandibular joint disorders, therapy
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152625 (URN)10.1111/eos.12572 (DOI)000449881600007 ()30298596 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
van den Broek, G., Takashima, A., Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Karlsson Wirebring, L., Segers, E., Verhoeven, L. & Nyberg, L. (2016). Neurocognitive mechanisms of the "testing effect": a review. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 5(2), 52-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurocognitive mechanisms of the "testing effect": a review
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Trends in Neuroscience and Education, ISSN 2452-0837, E-ISSN 2211-9493, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 52-66Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Memory retrieval is an active process that can alter the content and accessibility of stored memories. Of potential relevance for educational practice are findings that memory retrieval fosters better retention than mere studying. This so-called testing effect has been demonstrated for different materials and populations, but there is limited consensus on the neurocognitive mechanisms involved. In this review, we relate cognitive accounts of the testing effect to findings from recent brain-imaging studies to identify neurocognitive factors that could explain the testing effect. Results indicate that testing facilitates later performance through several processes, including effects on semantic memory representations, the selective strengthening of relevant associations and inhibition of irrelevant associations, as well as potentiation of subsequent learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Testing effect, Retrieval, Test-potentiated learning, fMRI, Semantic elaboration, Search set restriction
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122415 (URN)10.1016/j.tine.2016.05.001 (DOI)000392619800002 ()
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Lithner, J., Jonsson, B., Liljekvist, Y., Norqvist, M. & Nyberg, L. (2015). Learning mathematics without a suggested solution method: durable effects on performance and brain activity. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 4(1-2), 6-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning mathematics without a suggested solution method: durable effects on performance and brain activity
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Trends in Neuroscience and Education, ISSN 2211-9493, Vol. 4, no 1-2, p. 6-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A dominant mathematics teaching method is to present a solution method and let pupils repeatedly practice it. An alternative method is to let pupils create a solution method themselves. The current study compared these two approaches in terms of lasting effects on performance and brain activity. Seventythree participants practiced mathematics according to one of the two approaches. One week later, participants underwent fMRI while being tested on the practice tasks. Participants who had created the solution method themselves performed better at the test questions. In both conditions, participants engaged a fronto-parietal network more when solving test questions compared to a baseline task. Importantly, participants who had created the solution method themselves showed relatively lower brain activity in angular gyrus, possibly reflecting reduced demands on verbal memory. These results indicate that there might be advantages to creating the solution method oneself, and thus have implications for the design of teaching methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Mathematics, Learning, fMRI, Parietal cortex, Angular gyrus, Education
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109088 (URN)10.1016/j.tine.2015.03.002 (DOI)000363545300002 ()
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Karlsson Wirebring, L., Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Eriksson, J., Andersson, M., Jonsson, B. & Nyberg, L. (2015). Lesser neural pattern similarity across repeated tests is associated with better long-term memory retention. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(26), 9595-9602
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lesser neural pattern similarity across repeated tests is associated with better long-term memory retention
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 35, no 26, p. 9595-9602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Encoding and retrieval processes enhance long-term memory performance. The efficiency of encoding processes has recently been linked to representational consistency: the reactivation of a representation that gets more specific each time an item is further studied. Here we examined the complementary hypothesis of whether the efficiency of retrieval processes also is linked to representational consistency. Alternatively, recurrent retrieval might foster representational variability—the altering or adding of underlying memory representa- tions. Human participants studied 60 Swahili–Swedish word pairs before being scanned with fMRI the same day and 1 week later. On Day 1, participants were tested three times on each word pair, and on Day 7 each pair was tested once. A BOLD signal change in right superior parietal cortex was associated with subsequent memory on Day 1 and with successful long-term retention on Day 7. A representational similarity analysis in this parietal region revealed that beneficial recurrent retrieval was associated with representational variability, such that the pattern similarity on Day 1 was lower for retrieved words subsequently remembered compared with those subsequently forgot- ten. This was mirrored by a monotonically decreased BOLD signal change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on Day 1 as a function of repeated successful retrieval for words subsequently remembered, but not for words subsequently forgotten. This reduction in prefrontal response could reflect reduced demands on cognitive control. Collectively, the results offer novel insights into why memory retention benefits from repeated retrieval, and they suggest fundamental differences between repeated study and repeated testing. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for Neuroscience, 2015
Keywords
fMRI, memory, pattern similarity, repeated testing, retrieval, RSA
National Category
Psychology Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96392 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3550-14.2015 (DOI)000358252600007 ()
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
von Helversen, B., Karlsson, L., Rasch, B. & Rieskamp, J. (2014). Neural substrates of similarity and rule-based strategies in judgment. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8, 809
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural substrates of similarity and rule-based strategies in judgment
2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 8, p. 809-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Making accurate judgments is a core human competence and a prerequisite for success in many areas of life. Plenty of evidence exists that people can employ different judgment strategies to solve identical judgment problems. In categorization, it has been demonstrated that similarity-based and rule-based strategies are associated with activity in different brain regions. Building on this research, the present work tests whether solving two identical judgment problems recruits different neural substrates depending on people's judgment strategies. Combining cognitive modeling of judgment strategies at the behavioral level with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compare brain activity when using two archetypal judgment strategies: a similarity-based exemplar strategy and a rule-based heuristic strategy. Using an exemplar-based strategy should recruit areas involved in long-term memory processes to a larger extent than a heuristic strategy. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy should recruit areas involved in the application of rules to a larger extent than an exemplar-based strategy. Largely consistent with our hypotheses, we found that using an exemplar-based strategy led to relatively higher BOLD activity in the anterior prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, presumably related to retrieval and selective attention processes. In contrast, using a heuristic strategy led to relatively higher activity in areas in the dorsolateral prefrontal and the temporal-parietal cortex associated with cognitive control and information integration. Thus, even when people solve identical judgment problems, different neural substrates can be recruited depending on the judgment strategy involved.

Keywords
judgment and decision making, fMRI, exemplar model, cognitive strategies, cognitive modeling, multi- tribute decision making
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95859 (URN)10.3389/fnhum.2014.00809 (DOI)000343036400001 ()25360099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-21 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Karlsson, L., Eriksson, J., Andersson, M., Jonsson, B. & Nyberg, L. (2013). Activity in left temporal-parietal regions characterizes long-term retention after repeated testing. Paper presented at 20th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive-Neuroscience-Society, APR 13-16, 2013, San Francisco, CA. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 25(Suppl.), S114-S114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activity in left temporal-parietal regions characterizes long-term retention after repeated testing
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 25, no Suppl., p. S114-S114Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Physiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71119 (URN)000317030500434 ()
Conference
20th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive-Neuroscience-Society, APR 13-16, 2013, San Francisco, CA
Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, L., Wiklund-Hornqvist, C., Eriksson, J., Jonsson, B. & Nyberg, L. (2013). Retrieval practice is characterized by reduced fronto-striatal activity. Paper presented at 20th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive-Neuroscience-Society, APR 13-16, 2013, San Francisco, CA. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 25(Suppl.), S82-S83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retrieval practice is characterized by reduced fronto-striatal activity
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 25, no Suppl., p. S82-S83Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Physiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71117 (URN)000317030500286 ()
Conference
20th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive-Neuroscience-Society, APR 13-16, 2013, San Francisco, CA
Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Von Helversen, B., Karlsson, L., Mata, R. & Wilke, A. (2013). Why does cue polarity information provide benefits in inference problems?: The role of strategy selection and knowledge of cue importance. Acta Psychologica, 144(1), 73-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why does cue polarity information provide benefits in inference problems?: The role of strategy selection and knowledge of cue importance
2013 (English)In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge about cue polarity (i.e., the sign of a cue–criterion relation) seems to boost performance in a wide range of inference tasks. Knowledge about cue polarity information may enhance performance by increasing (1) the reliance on rule- relative to similarity-based strategies, and (2) explicit knowledge about the relative importance of cues. We investigated the relative contribution of these two mechanisms in a multiple-cue judgment task and a categorization task, which typically differ in the inference strategies they elicit and potentially the explicit task knowledge available to participants. In both tasks participants preferred rule-based relative to similarity-based strategies and had more knowledge about cue importance when cue polarity information was provided. Strategy selection was not related to increases in performance in the categorization task and could only partly explain increases in performance in the judgment task. In contrast, explicit knowledge about the importance of cues was related to better performance in both categorization and judgment independently of the strategy used. In sum, our results suggest that the benefits of receiving cue polarity information may span across tasks, such multiple-cue judgment and categorization, primarily by enhancing knowledge of relative cue importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Category learning, Judgment, Decision making, Knowledge, Computational modeling
National Category
Psychology Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80739 (URN)10.1016/j.actpsy.2013.05.007 (DOI)000323469600010 ()23770569 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-10-01 Created: 2013-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Mata, R., von Helversen, B., Karlsson, L. & Cuepper, L. (2012). Adult age differences in categorization and multiple-cue judgment. Developmental Psychology, 48(4), 1188-1201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult age differences in categorization and multiple-cue judgment
2012 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 1188-1201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We often need to infer unknown properties of objects from observable ones, just like detectives must infer guilt from observable clues and behavior. But how do inferential processes change with age? We examined young and older adults' reliance on rule-based and similarity-based processes in an inference task that can be considered either a categorization or a multiple-cue judgment task, depending on the nature of the criterion (binary vs. continuous). Both older and young adults relied on rule-based processes in the multiple-cue judgment task. In the categorization task, however, the majority of older adults relied on rule-based processes while young adults preferred similarity-based processes. Moreover, older adults who relied on rule-based processes performed poorly compared with young adults who relied on the same process, suggesting that aging is associated with deficits in applying rule-based processes.

Keywords
categorization, multiple-cue judgment, aging, exemplar model, recognition memory
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57752 (URN)10.1037/a0026084 (DOI)000306094800023 ()
Available from: 2012-08-15 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications