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Gustafsson, Torfinn
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Eriksson, A., Gustafsson, T., Hoistad, M., Hultcrantz, M., Jacobson, S., Mejare, I. & Persson, A. (2017). Diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging vs autopsy: a systematic review. European Journal of Radiology, 89, 249-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging vs autopsy: a systematic review
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Radiology, ISSN 0720-048X, E-ISSN 1872-7727, Vol. 89, p. 249-269Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Postmortem imaging has been used for more than a century as a complement to medico-legal autopsies. The technique has also emerged as a possible alternative to compensate for the continuous decline in the number of clinical autopsies. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging for various types of findings, we performed this systematic literature review. Data sources The literature search was performed in the databases PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library through January 7, 2015. Relevant publications were assessed for risk of bias using the QUADAS tool and were classified as low, moderate or high risk of bias according to pre-defined criteria. Autopsy and/or histopathology were used as reference standard. Findings The search generated 2600 abstracts, of which 340 were assessed as possibly relevant and read in full-text. After further evaluation 71 studies were finally included, of which 49 were assessed as having high risk of bias and 22 as moderate risk of bias. Due to considerable heterogeneity - in populations, techniques, analyses and reporting - of included studies it was impossible to combine data to get a summary estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the various findings. Individual studies indicate, however, that imaging techniques might be useful for determining organ weights, and that the techniques seem superior to autopsy for detecting gas Conclusions and Implications In general, based on the current scientific literature, it was not possible to determine the diagnostic accuracy of postmortem imaging and its usefulness in conjunction with, or as an alternative to autopsy. To correctly determine the usefulness of postmortem imaging, future studies need improved planning, improved methodological quality and larger materials, preferentially obtained from multi-center studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2017
Keywords
Postmortem imaging, Autopsy, Systematic review, Diagnostic accuracy
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137014 (URN)10.1016/j.ejrad.2016.08.003 (DOI)000401094900037 ()28089245 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-29 Created: 2017-06-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, T., Eriksson, A. & Wingren, C. J. (2017). Multivariate linear regression modelling of lung weight in 24,056 Swedish medico-legal autopsy cases. Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, 46, 20-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivariate linear regression modelling of lung weight in 24,056 Swedish medico-legal autopsy cases
2017 (English)In: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, ISSN 1752-928X, E-ISSN 1878-7487, Vol. 46, p. 20-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heavy combined lung weight at autopsy is a non-specific autopsy finding associated with certain causes of death such as intoxication. There is however no clear definition of what constitutes "heavy" lung weight. Different reference values have been suggested but previous studies have been limited by small select populations and only univariate regression has been attempted. The aim of this study was to create a model to estimate lung weight from decedent parameters. We identified all cases >18 years age autopsied at the Swedish National Board of Forensic Medicine from 2000 through 2013, excluding cases with a post-mortem interval >5 days as well as cases with extreme values, totalling 24,056 cases. We analysed body weight, body height, sex, age, BMI, BSA as well as untransformed and transformed lung weight. The analysis was stratified for sex. We evaluated the fit of the models and that the model assumptions were not violated. We set out to apply the model with the highest residual sum of squares to derive limits for heavy lungs. In univariate regression BSA and height showed best performance. The final model included height, weight and age group. After excluding large standardized residuals (>3, <-3) the final model achieved R-2 of 0.132 and 0.106 for women and men respectively. While we managed to create a multivariate model its performance was poor, possibly a fact reflective of the physiological nature of the lungs and in turn its variability in fluid content. Linear regression is a poor model for estimating lung weight in an unselected population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
Keywords
Lungs, Autopsy, Weight, Linear regression
National Category
Forensic Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133445 (URN)10.1016/j.jflm.2016.12.001 (DOI)000397021900004 ()28040667 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, T. & Eriksson, A. (2015). Fatal Eurasian brown bear attacks: two Swedish fatalities in modern times. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 60(6), 1658-1661
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatal Eurasian brown bear attacks: two Swedish fatalities in modern times
2015 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Sciences, ISSN 0022-1198, E-ISSN 1556-4029, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 1658-1661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fatal bear attacks on humans are uncommon with only one reported case in Sweden since 1902. The bear population is, however, growing and the frequency of confrontations is likely to increase. Case I-A 40-year-old hunter and his dog were found dead near a bear's den. Autopsy showed that a large portion of the face, facial skeleton, and anterior portion of the brain was missing. Autopsy of the bear showed two nonfatal gunshot wounds. Case II-A 61-year-old man and his dog were found dead outside a hunting lodge. Autopsy revealed numerous wounds, including partial evisceration of the intestines. The victim's blood ethanol concentration was 0.27%. These cases confirm the presence of risk factors identified by the Scandinavian Brown Bear Research Project, that is, provocation by a dog, encountering an injured bear, and appearing close to its den. An additional possible factor in case II was ethanol intoxication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
forensic science, fatal bear attack, forensic pathology, autopsy, eurasian brown bear, Ursus arctos arctos, mauling, animal attack
National Category
Forensic Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122243 (URN)10.1111/1556-4029.12870 (DOI)000367672300041 ()26251175 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, T. & Eriksson, A. (2013). Off-road vehicle fatalities: a comparison of all-terrain vehicle and snowmobile accidents in Sweden. International Association of Traffic and Safety Sciences (IATSS) Research, 37, 12-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Off-road vehicle fatalities: a comparison of all-terrain vehicle and snowmobile accidents in Sweden
2013 (English)In: International Association of Traffic and Safety Sciences (IATSS) Research, ISSN 0386-1112, Vol. 37, p. 12-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates accident fatalities involving two types of off-road vehicles: snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). All snowmobile fatalities in Sweden from the 2006/2007 season through the 2011/2012 season, and all ATV fatalities from 2007 through 2012, were retrospectively examined. A total of 107 fatalities—57 snowmobile-related and 50 ATV-related—were found. Most deaths occurred on weekends (71% of the snowmobile-related and 72% of the ATV-related). A majority of the fatalities were males (91% and 94%), with the largest share in the age group 40–49 years (19% and 24%). The most common causes of death were blunt trauma (56% and 66%), drowning (30% vs 6%), and traumatic asphyxia (9% vs 14%). Among victims who were tested (95% vs 92%), a very high share was found to be inebriated (59% vs 61%), and mean blood alcohol concentration was also high (1.9 vs 1.7 g/l). Forty-seven percent of snowmobile-related fatalities and 48% of ATV-related fatalities had a blood alcohol concentration above 1.0 g/l. This means that there was a very strong association between off-road vehicle fatalities and drunken riding; steps to prevent riding while intoxicated seem to be the most important preventive measure. Automatic measures such as alcolocks are probably the most effective. The obvious at-risk group to target is middle-aged men with high alcohol consumption.

Keywords
all-terrain vehicles, ATVs, snowmobiles, fatal crashes, fatalities, off-road vehicles
National Category
Forensic Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122245 (URN)10.1016/j.iatssr.2013.06.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-16 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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