umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Brugel, Sonia
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Bidleman, T. F., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Haglund, P., Kupryianchyk, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2019). Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 881-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517 (URN)10.1039/C9EM00042A (DOI)000468787800009 ()31032511 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rowe, O. F., Figueroa, D., Kratzer, S. & Legrand, C. (2018). Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 204, 225-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 204, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria are key groups at the base of aquatic food webs. In estuaries receiving riverine water with a high content of coloured allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM), phytoplankton primary production may be reduced, while bacterial production is favoured. We tested this hypothesis by performing a field study in a northerly estuary receiving nutrient-poor, ADOM-rich riverine water, and analyzing results using multivariate statistics. Throughout the productive season, and especially during the spring river flush, the production and growth rate of heterotrophic bacteria were stimulated by the riverine inflow of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In contrast, primary production and photosynthetic efficiency (i.e. phytoplankton growth rate) were negatively affected by DOC. Primary production related positively to phosphorus, which is the limiting nutrient in the area. In the upper estuary where DOC concentrations were the highest, the heterotrophic bacterial production constituted almost 100% of the basal production (sum of primary and bacterial production) during spring, while during summer the primary and bacterial production were approximately equal. Our study shows that riverine DOC had a strong negative influence on coastal phytoplankton production, likely due to light attenuation. On the other hand DOC showed a positive influence on bacterial production since it represents a supplementary food source. Thus, in boreal regions where climate change will cause increased river inflow to coastal waters, the balance between phytoplankton and bacterial production is likely to be changed, favouring bacteria. The pelagic food web structure and overall productivity will in turn be altered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Primary and bacterial production, Coastal areas, Estuary, Allochthonous dissolved organic matter, Northern Baltic Sea
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147287 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2018.02.032 (DOI)000429757300020 ()
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Båmstedt, U. & Brugel, S. (2017). A cost-precision model for marine environmental monitoring, based on time-integrated averages. Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, 189(7), Article ID 354.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cost-precision model for marine environmental monitoring, based on time-integrated averages
2017 (English)In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, E-ISSN 1573-2959, Vol. 189, no 7, article id 354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ongoing marine monitoring programs are seldom designed to detect changes in the environment between different years, mainly due to the high number of samples required for a sufficient statistical precision. We here show that pooling over time (time integration) of seasonal measurements provides an efficient method of reducing variability, thereby improving the precision and power in detecting inter-annual differences. Such data from weekly environmental sensor profiles at 21 stations in the northern Bothnian Sea was used in a cost-precision spatio-temporal allocation model. Time-integrated averages for six different variables over 6 months from a rather heterogeneous area showed low variability between stations (coefficient of variation, CV, range of 0.6-12.4%) compared to variability between stations in a single day (CV range 2.4-88.6%), or variability over time for a single station (CV range 0.4-110.7%). Reduced sampling frequency from weekly to approximately monthly sampling did not change the results markedly, whereas lower frequency differed more from results with weekly sampling. With monthly sampling, high precision and power of estimates could therefore be achieved with a low number of stations. With input of cost factors like ship time, labor, and analyses, the model can predict the cost for a given required precision in the time-integrated average of each variable by optimizing sampling allocation. A following power analysis can provide information on minimum sample size to detect differences between years with a required power. Alternatively, the model can predict the precision of annual means for the included variables when the program has a pre-defined budget. Use of time-integrated results from sampling stations with different areal coverage and environmental heterogeneity can thus be an efficient strategy to detect environmental differences between single years, as well as a long-term temporal trend. Use of the presented allocation model will then help to minimize the cost and effort of a monitoring program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Environmental surveys, Cost of precision, Optimal allocation, Seasonal variability, Marine environments, Coastal ecology
National Category
Control Engineering Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138552 (URN)10.1007/s10661-017-6064-6 (DOI)000404652900051 ()28647904 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Meunier, C. L., Liess, A., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Paczkowska, J., Rahman, H., . . . Rowe, O. F. (2017). Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web: a mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff. Marine Environmental Research, 129, 236-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web: a mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 129, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change predictions indicate that coastal and estuarine environments will receive increased terrestrial runoff via increased river discharge. This discharge transports allochthonous material, containing bioavailable nutrients and light attenuating matter. Since light and nutrients are important drivers of basal production, their relative and absolute availability have important consequences for the base of the aquatic food web, with potential ramifications for higher trophic levels. Here, we investigated the effects of shifts in terrestrial organic matter and light availability on basal producers and their grazers. In twelve Baltic Sea mesocosms, we simulated the effects of increased river runoff alone and in combination. We manipulated light (clear/shade) and carbon (added/not added) in a fully factorial design, with three replicates. We assessed microzooplankton grazing preferences in each treatment to assess whether increased terrestrial organic matter input would: (1) decrease the phytoplankton to bacterial biomass ratio, (2) shift microzooplanlcton diet from phytoplankton to bacteria, and (3) affect microzooplankton biomass. We found that carbon addition, but not reduced light levels per se resulted in lower phytoplanlcton to bacteria biomass ratios. Microzooplankton generally showed a strong feeding preference for phytoplanlcton over bacteria, but, in carbon-amended mesocosms which favored bacteria, microzooplankton shifted their diet towards bacteria. Furthermore, low total prey availability corresponded with low microzooplankton biomass and the highest bacteria/phytoplankton ratio. Overall our results suggest that in shallow coastal waters, modified with allochthonous matter from river discharge, light attenuation may be inconsequential for the basal producer balance, whereas increased allochthonous carbon, especially if readily bioavailable, favors bacteria over phytoplankton. We conclude that climate change induced shifts at the base of the food web may alter energy mobilization to and the biomass of microzooplankton grazers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Trophic interactions, Food quality, Phytoplankton, Bacteria, Competition, Microzooplankton
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139152 (URN)10.1016/j.marenvres.2017.06.008 (DOI)000407981500021 ()28645656 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F., Guleikova, L., Brugel, S., Byström, P. & Andersson, A. (2016). A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea. Regional Studies in Marine Science, 3, 8-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Regional Studies in Marine Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi has been well documented in southern areas of the Baltic Sea, however, little research on this invasive species (nor the zooplankton community) has focused on the Gulf of Bothnia (Bothnian Sea and Bay). We analysed data collected over a 12–13 year period at two main stations, one coastal and one offshore, to examine the occurrence of C. pengoi, invasion dynamics, effects on natural zooplankton communities and associated environmental factors. Nine other stations in the Gulf of Bothnia were also examined and the contribution to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) diet was quantified. The zooplankton community response apparently differed between coastal and offshore stations with Bosmina, Eurytemora, and Acartia populations being influenced during peak abundances of C. pengoi. It appears that the native zooplankton community has some resilience, returning to its prior structure outside of peak invasion periods. C. pengoi, where present, contributed significantly to stickleback diet. We explored possible barriers for C. pengoi in the Bothnian Bay, suggesting that the low productive Bothnian Bay ecosystem may be incapable of supporting such a predator. This highlights the need for further studies, especially in the light of global climate change.

Keywords
Cercopagis pengoi, Coast, Zooplankton, Invasive species, Barriers, Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea)
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120860 (URN)10.1016/j.rsma.2015.12.004 (DOI)000414755500002 ()
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rowe, O. F. & Brugel, S. (2016). Födobrist verkar stoppa rovvattenloppa. Havsutsikt (1), 12-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Födobrist verkar stoppa rovvattenloppa
2016 (Swedish)In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122135 (URN)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Paczkowska, J., Brugel, S., Rowe, O., Lefébure, R., Brutemark, A. & Andersson, A.Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on a coastal phytoplankton community.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on a coastal phytoplankton community
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126385 (URN)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Andersson, A., Joanna, P., Brugel, S., Rowe, O., Figueroa, D. & Kratzer, S.Marked impact of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on estuarine primary and bacterial production.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marked impact of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on estuarine primary and bacterial production
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126384 (URN)
Available from: 2016-10-03 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications