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Johansson, M
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Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Vrieling, A., Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B., Ros, M. M., Kampman, E., Aben, K. K., Buchner, F. L., . . . Kiemeney, L. A. (2019). One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. International Journal of Cancer, 145(9), 2349-2359
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 9, p. 2349-2359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Published associations between dietary folate and bladder cancer risk are inconsistent. Biomarkers may provide more accurate measures of nutrient status. This nested case-control analysis within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) investigated associations between pre-diagnostic serum folate, homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and the risk of urothelial cell carcinomas of the bladder (UCC). A total of 824 patients with newly diagnosed UCC were matched with 824 cohort members. Serum folate, homocysteine, and vitamins B6 and B12 were measured. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total, aggressive, and non-aggressive UCC were estimated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, and other potential confounders. Additionally, statistical interaction with smoking status was assessed. A halving in serum folate concentrations was moderately associated with risk of UCC (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.98-1.43), in particular aggressive UCC (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.02-1.75; p-heterogeneity = 0.19). Compared to never smokers in the highest quartile of folate concentrations, this association seemed only apparent among current smokers in the lowest quartile of folate concentrations (OR: 6.26; 95% CI: 3.62-10.81, p-interaction = 0.07). Dietary folate was not associated with aggressive UCC (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.81-1.95; p-heterogeneity = 0.14). No association was observed between serum homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and risk of UCC. This study suggests that lower serum folate concentrations are associated with increased UCC risk, in particular aggressive UCC. Residual confounding by smoking cannot be ruled out and these findings require confirmation in future studies with multiple measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
urothelial cell carcinomas, folate, B-vitamins, biomarker, nested case-control
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166486 (URN)10.1002/ijc.32165 (DOI)000483585800004 ()30694528 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Baglietto, L., Ponzi, E., Haycock, P., Hodge, A., Bianca Assumma, M., Jung, C.-H., . . . Severi, G. (2017). DNA methylation changes measured in pre-diagnostic peripheral blood samples are associated with smoking and lung cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 140(1), 50-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DNA methylation changes measured in pre-diagnostic peripheral blood samples are associated with smoking and lung cancer risk
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

DNA methylation changes are associated with cigarette smoking. We used the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array to determine whether methylation in DNA from pre-diagnostic, peripheral blood samples is associated with lung cancer risk. We used a case-control study nested within the EPIC-Italy cohort and a study within the MCCS cohort as discovery sets (a total of 552 case-control pairs). We validated the top signals in 429 case-control pairs from another 3 studies. We identified six CpGs for which hypomethylation was associated with lung cancer risk: cg05575921 in the AHRR gene (p-valuepooled  = 4 × 10(-17) ), cg03636183 in the F2RL3 gene (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10 (- 13) ), cg21566642 and cg05951221 in 2q37.1 (p-valuepooled  = 7 × 10(-16) and 1 × 10(-11) respectively), cg06126421 in 6p21.33 (p-valuepooled  = 2 × 10(-15) ) and cg23387569 in 12q14.1 (p-valuepooled  = 5 × 10(-7) ). For cg05951221 and cg23387569 the strength of association was virtually identical in never and current smokers. For all these CpGs except for cg23387569, the methylation levels were different across smoking categories in controls (p-valuesheterogeneity  ≤ 1.8 x10 (- 7) ), were lowest for current smokers and increased with time since quitting for former smokers. We observed a gain in discrimination between cases and controls measured by the area under the ROC curve of at least 8% (p-values ≥ 0.003) in former smokers by adding methylation at the 6 CpGs into risk prediction models including smoking status and number of pack-years. Our findings provide convincing evidence that smoking and possibly other factors lead to DNA methylation changes measurable in peripheral blood that may improve prediction of lung cancer risk.

Keywords
DNA methylation, lung cancer risk, smoking
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129400 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30431 (DOI)000387620600007 ()27632354 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-27 Created: 2016-12-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gusev, A., Shi, H., Kichaev, G., Pomerantz, M., Li, F., Long, H. W., . . . Pasaniuc, B. (2016). Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation.. Nature Communications, 7, Article ID 10979.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation.
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2016 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 10979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although genome-wide association studies have identified over 100 risk loci that explain ∼33% of familial risk for prostate cancer (PrCa), their functional effects on risk remain largely unknown. Here we use genotype data from 59,089 men of European and African American ancestries combined with cell-type-specific epigenetic data to build a genomic atlas of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heritability in PrCa. We find significant differences in heritability between variants in prostate-relevant epigenetic marks defined in normal versus tumour tissue as well as between tissue and cell lines. The majority of SNP heritability lies in regions marked by H3k27 acetylation in prostate adenoc7arcinoma cell line (LNCaP) or by DNaseI hypersensitive sites in cancer cell lines. We find a high degree of similarity between European and African American ancestries suggesting a similar genetic architecture from common variation underlying PrCa risk. Our findings showcase the power of integrating functional annotation with genetic data to understand the genetic basis of PrCa.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122103 (URN)10.1038/ncomms10979 (DOI)000373804700001 ()27052111 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Price, A. J., Travis, R. C., Appleby, P. N., Albanes, D., Barricarte Gurrea, A., Bjørge, T., . . . Allen, N. E. (2016). Circulating Folate and Vitamin B12 and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Collaborative Analysis of Individual Participant Data from Six Cohorts Including 6875 Cases and 8104 Controls. European Urology, 70(6), 941-951
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating Folate and Vitamin B12 and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Collaborative Analysis of Individual Participant Data from Six Cohorts Including 6875 Cases and 8104 Controls
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2016 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 941-951Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Folate and vitamin B12 are essential for maintaining DNA integrity and may influence prostate cancer (PCa) risk, but the association with clinically relevant, advanced stage, and high-grade disease is unclear.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations between circulating folate and vitamin B12 concentrations and risk of PCa overall and by disease stage and grade.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A study was performed with a nested case-control design based on individual participant data from six cohort studies including 6875 cases and 8104 controls; blood collection from 1981 to 2008, and an average follow-up of 8.9 yr (standard deviation 7.3). Odds ratios (ORs) of incident PCa by study-specific fifths of circulating folate and vitamin B12 were calculated using multivariable adjusted conditional logistic regression.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Incident PCa and subtype by stage and grade.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Higher folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were associated with a small increase in risk of PCa (ORs for the top vs bottom fifths were 1.13 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.02-1.26], ptrend=0.018, for folate and 1.12 [95% CI, 1.01-1.25], ptrend=0.017, for vitamin B12), with no evidence of heterogeneity between studies. The association with folate varied by tumour grade (pheterogeneity<0.001); higher folate concentration was associated with an elevated risk of high-grade disease (OR for the top vs bottom fifth: 2.30 [95% CI, 1.28-4.12]; ptrend=0.001), with no association for low-grade disease. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in the association of folate with risk by stage or of vitamin B12 with risk by stage or grade of disease (pheterogeneity>0.05). Use of single blood-sample measurements of folate and B12 concentrations is a limitation.

CONCLUSIONS: The association between higher folate concentration and risk of high-grade disease, not evident for low-grade disease, suggests a possible role for folate in the progression of clinically relevant PCa and warrants further investigation.

PATIENT SUMMARY: Folate, a vitamin obtained from foods and supplements, is important for maintaining cell health. In this study, however, men with higher blood folate levels were at greater risk of high-grade (more aggressive) prostate cancer compared with men with lower folate levels. Further research is needed to investigate the possible role of folate in the progression of this disease.

Keywords
Folate, Vitamin B-12, Prostate cancer, High grade, Prospective cohort, Pooled data meta-analysis
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122122 (URN)10.1016/j.eururo.2016.03.029 (DOI)000390563100020 ()27061263 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Fehringer, G., Kraft, P., Pharoah, P. D., Eeles, R. A., Chatterjee, N., Schumacher, F. R., . . . Hung, R. J. (2016). Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations. Cancer Research, 76(17), 5103-5114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations
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2016 (English)In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 76, no 17, p. 5103-5114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122101 (URN)10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2980 (DOI)000382298900020 ()27197191 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Kachuri, L., Amos, C. I., Mckay, J. D., Johansson, M., Vineis, P., Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B., . . . Hung, R. J. (2016). Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci. Carcinogenesis, 37(1), 96-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci
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2016 (English)In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000x) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73x10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64x10(-6)), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27x10(-5)), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06x10(-5); among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41x10(-4)). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44x10(-3)) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84x10(-7)) and lung cancer (P = 2.37x10(-5)) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116749 (URN)10.1093/carcin/bgv165 (DOI)000368412900013 ()26590902 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-19 Created: 2016-02-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lesseur, C., Diergaarde, B., Olshan, A. F., Wünsch-Filho, V., Ness, A. R., Liu, G., . . . Brennan, P. (2016). Genome-wide association analyses identify new susceptibility loci for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer [Letter to the editor]. Nature Genetics, 48(12), 1544-1550
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide association analyses identify new susceptibility loci for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer
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2016 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 48, no 12, p. 1544-1550Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a genome-wide association study of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in 6,034 cases and 6,585 controls from Europe, North America and South America. We detected eight significantly associated loci (P < 5 × 10(-8)), seven of which are new for these cancer sites. Oral and pharyngeal cancers combined were associated with loci at 6p21.32 (rs3828805, HLA-DQB1), 10q26.13 (rs201982221, LHPP) and 11p15.4 (rs1453414, OR52N2-TRIM5). Oral cancer was associated with two new regions, 2p23.3 (rs6547741, GPN1) and 9q34.12 (rs928674, LAMC3), and with known cancer-related loci-9p21.3 (rs8181047, CDKN2B-AS1) and 5p15.33 (rs10462706, CLPTM1L). Oropharyngeal cancer associations were limited to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and classical HLA allele imputation showed a protective association with the class II haplotype HLA-DRB1*1301-HLA-DQA1*0103-HLA-DQB1*0603 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.59, P = 2.7 × 10(-9)). Stratified analyses on a subgroup of oropharyngeal cases with information available on human papillomavirus (HPV) status indicated that this association was considerably stronger in HPV-positive (OR = 0.23, P = 1.6 × 10(-6)) than in HPV-negative (OR = 0.75, P = 0.16) cancers.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129407 (URN)10.1038/ng.3685 (DOI)000389011100015 ()27749845 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-27 Created: 2016-12-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Scelo, G., Hofmann, J. N., Banks, R. E., Bigot, P., Bhatt, R. S., Cancel-Tassin, G., . . . Chanock, S. J. (2016). International cancer seminars: a focus on kidney cancer. Annals of Oncology, 27(8), 1382-1385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International cancer seminars: a focus on kidney cancer
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2016 (English)In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1382-1385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent years have seen important advances in our understanding of the etiology, biology and genetics of kidney cancer. To summarize important achievements and identify prominent research questions that remain, a workshop was organized by IARC and the US NCI. A series of 'difficult questions' were formulated, which should be given future priority in the areas of population, genomic and clinical research.Recent years have seen important advances in our understanding of the etiology, biology and genetics of kidney cancer. To summarize important achievements and identify prominent research questions that remain, a workshop was organized by IARC and the US NCI. A series of 'difficult questions' were formulated, which should be given future priority in the areas of population, genomic and clinical research.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122125 (URN)10.1093/annonc/mdw186 (DOI)000383182800008 ()27130845 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Brenner, D. R., Yannitsos, D. H., Farris, M. S., Johansson, M. & Friedenreich, C. M. (2016). Leisure-time physical activity and lung cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lung Cancer, 95, 17-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leisure-time physical activity and lung cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2016 (English)In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 95, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between recreational physical activity and lung cancer risk to update previous analyses and to examine population subgroups of interest defined by smoking status and histology.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched the PubMed database for studies up to May 2015. Individual study characteristics were abstracted including study design, number of cases, assessment of recreational physical activity and type and level of adjustment for confounding factors. Combined effect estimates were calculated for the overall associations and across subgroups of interest.

RESULTS: We identified 28 studies that were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The overall analysis indicated an inverse association between recreational physical activity and lung cancer risk (Relative Risk (RR), 0.76; 95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.69-0.85, p-value: <0.001). Similar inverse associations with risk were also noted for all evaluated histological subtypes, including adenocarcinoma (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.88), squamous (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.71-0.90) and small cell (RR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.66-0.94). When we examined effects by smoking status, inverse associations between recreational physical activity and lung cancer risk were observed among former (RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.85) and current smokers (RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.72-0.83), but not among never smokers (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79-1.18).

CONCLUSION: Results from this meta-analysis suggest that regular recreational physical activity may be associated with reduced risk of lung cancer. Only four studies examining never smokers were identified, suggesting the need for additional research in this population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-122094 (URN)10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.01.021 (DOI)000374919500004 ()27040847 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Freisling, H., Pisa, P. T., Ferrari, P., Byrnes, G., Moskal, A., Dahm, C. C., . . . Slimani, N. (2016). Main nutrient patterns are associated with prospective weight change in adults from 10 European countries. European Journal of Nutrition, 55(6), 2093-2104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Main nutrient patterns are associated with prospective weight change in adults from 10 European countries
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 2093-2104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Various food patterns have been associated with weight change in adults, but it is unknown which combinations of nutrients may account for such observations. We investigated associations between main nutrient patterns and prospective weight change in adults.

METHODS: This study includes 235,880 participants, 25-70 years old, recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Intakes of 23 nutrients were estimated from country-specific validated dietary questionnaires using the harmonized EPIC Nutrient DataBase. Four nutrient patterns, explaining 67 % of the total variance of nutrient intakes, were previously identified from principal component analysis. Body weight was measured at recruitment and self-reported 5 years later. The relationship between nutrient patterns and annual weight change was examined separately for men and women using linear mixed models with random effect according to center controlling for confounders.

RESULTS: Mean weight gain was 460 g/year (SD 950) and 420 g/year (SD 940) for men and women, respectively. The annual differences in weight gain per one SD increase in the pattern scores were as follows: principal component (PC) 1, characterized by nutrients from plant food sources, was inversely associated with weight gain in men (-22 g/year; 95 % CI -33 to -10) and women (-18 g/year; 95 % CI -26 to -11). In contrast, PC4, characterized by protein, vitamin B2, phosphorus, and calcium, was associated with a weight gain of +41 g/year (95 % CI +2 to +80) and +88 g/year (95 % CI +36 to +140) in men and women, respectively. Associations with PC2, a pattern driven by many micro-nutrients, and with PC3, a pattern driven by vitamin D, were less consistent and/or non-significant.

CONCLUSIONS: We identified two main nutrient patterns that are associated with moderate but significant long-term differences in weight gain in adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Dietary patterns, Nutrients, Weight gain, Obesity, Energy balance, Public health
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116968 (URN)10.1007/s00394-015-1023-x (DOI)000382751000011 ()26303194 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-16 Created: 2016-02-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved

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