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Sundin, J., Jutfelt, F., Thorlacius, M., Fick, J. & Brodin, T. (2019). Behavioural alterations induced by the anxiolytic pollutant oxazepam are reversible after depuration in a freshwater fish. Science of the Total Environment, 665, 390-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioural alterations induced by the anxiolytic pollutant oxazepam are reversible after depuration in a freshwater fish
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 665, p. 390-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic pharmaceutical pollutants have been detected in nature across the globe, and recent work has shown negative effects of pharmaceuticals on the health and welfare of many animals. However, whether alterations can be reversed has been poorly investigated, although such studies are essential to assess the effects of high-peak exposure events in waterways where pharmaceutical concentrations are usually low. In this study, we investigated the effects of two concentrations (environmentally relevant 1 μg L−1 and high 100 μg L−1) of oxazepam, an anxiolytic commonly detected in aquatic environments, and whether behavioural alterations are reversible after depuration. Specifically, we measured daytime and night-time swimming activity and daytime behaviours related to boldness (foraging, sheltering and routine swimming activity) using the freshwater burbot (Lota lota). We found that both swimming activity and boldness were affected by oxazepam. Fish exposed to the higher level had a higher burst swimming duration (i.e., fast swimming bouts), both in the daytime and night-time trials. Further, fish exposed to the lower oxazepam level spent less time sheltering than control- and high-level exposed fish, but there was no difference between the control and high oxazepam treatments. For routine swimming activity, quantified in the boldness trials, and for latency to forage, there were no treatment effects. When retesting the fish after depuration, the detected behavioural alterations were no longer present. Since the magnitude of these effects were not consistent across endpoints, our study suggests that oxazepam might not be a great concern for this particular, stress tolerant, species, highlighting the importance of evaluating species-specific effects of pharmaceuticals. The observation that the effects we did find were reversible after depuration is encouraging, and indicates that rapid restoration of behaviours after removal from oxazepam contamination is possible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Benzodiazepines, Boldness, Swimming activity, Pharmaceutical contaminants
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157731 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.049 (DOI)000460628600040 ()30772569 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061438548 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Saaristo, M., Lagesson, A., Bertram, M. G., Fick, J., Klaminder, J., Johnstone, C. P., . . . Brodin, T. (2019). Behavioural effects of psychoactive pharmaceutical exposure on European perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a multi-stressor environment. Science of the Total Environment, 655, 1311-1320
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioural effects of psychoactive pharmaceutical exposure on European perch (Perca fluviatilis) in a multi-stressor environment
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 655, p. 1311-1320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the ability to resist biodegradation and exert therapeutic effects at low concentrations, pharmaceutical contaminants have become environmental stressors for wildlife. One such contaminant is the anxiolytic oxazepam, a psychoactive pharmaceutical that is frequently detected in surface waters globally. Despite growing interest in understanding how wildlife respond to anxiolytics, synergistic effects of pharmaceuticals and other abiotic (e.g. temperature) and biotic (e.g. predation risk) stressors remain unclear. Here, using a multi-stressor approach, we investigated effects of 7-day oxazepam exposure (6.5 μg/L) on anxiety-related behaviours in juvenile European perch (Perca fluviatilis). The multi-stressor approach was achieved by exposing perch to oxazepam at two temperatures (10 °C and 18 °C), and at two predation risk regimes—generated using chemical cues from the northern pike (Esox lucius). Our exposures resulted in a successful uptake of the drug from the water, i.e., oxazepam was measured in perch muscle tissue at 50 ± 17 ng/g (mean ± SD). We found significant oxazepam-induced effects on boldness, with 76.7% of the treated fish entering the white background (i.e. ‘exposed’ area where exposure to presumed risks are higher) within the first 5 min, compared to 66.6% of the control fish. We also found a significant effect of temperature on total time spent freezing (i.e. staying motionless). Specifically, fish in the low temperature treatments (oxazepam, predation) froze for longer than fish in high temperatures. Our multi-stressor study is the first to uncover how anxiety-related behaviours in wild juvenile fish are altered by changes in water temperature and perceived predation risk. Importantly, our findings highlight the need to focus on multiple stressors to improve understanding of how organisms not only survive, but adapt to, human-induced environmental change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Anti-predator behaviour, Behavioural ecotoxicology, Oxazepam, Pharmaceuticals, Temperature effect
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155752 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.11.228 (DOI)000455034600127 ()30577123 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-4431
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Faleye, A. C., Adegoke, A. A., Ramluckan, K., Fick, J., Bux, F. & Stenstrom, T. A. (2019). Concentration and reduction of antibiotic residues in selected wastewater treatment plants and receiving waterbodies in Durban, South Africa. Science of the Total Environment, 678, 10-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concentration and reduction of antibiotic residues in selected wastewater treatment plants and receiving waterbodies in Durban, South Africa
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 678, p. 10-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa the incidence of resistant tuberculosis, upper respiratory tract diseases as well as diarrhoeal and parasitic infections is high. Treatment of these diseases with antibiotics is partly reflected by the excretion of the respective antibiotics and their subsequent occurrence in wastewater. Their quantitative reduction in wastewater treatment reflects their potential environmental as well as human impact, the latter due to the use of the recipient water for domestic purposes and for irrigation. Information of the occurrence and reduction of different classes of antibiotics in wastewater treatment is sparse, especially the particle bound fraction of these. Due to this, analyses of aqueous and particle bound antibiotics in untreated wastewater of four selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their receiving water bodies was carried out in Durban, South Africa. The treatment step especially considered was the biological one, represented by activated sludge and trickling filters. The treatment further included secondary clarifiers and final chlorine disinfection. Composite samples were collected during the period February 2017 to May 2017 and analysed with online solid phase extraction - high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (SPE-HPLC-MS). For the 13 assessed antibiotics, the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.07 to 0.33 ng L-1 and 0.23 to 1.09 ng L-1 respectively, while the total percentage recovery was in the range of 51 to 111%. The percentage of individual antibiotics bound to the particulate fraction normally lost by sample (influent) filtration, if not analysed in parallel, was in the range of 2.6%-97.3% (n = 32). In this fraction (sludge from centrifuge sample), the concentration of bound antibiotics of all the target antibiotics were detected in the influent of all WWTP in concentration ranges between 1.3 ng L-1 (Azithromycin; AZI) to 81,748 ng(-1) (Ciprofloxacin; CIP). The antibiotics with the highest median concentrations in receiving water bodies of the respective WWTP were: Sulfamethoxazole; SUL (239 ng L-1) WWTP "K", Ciprofloxacin; CIP (708 ng L-1) WWTP "S" and Albendazole; ALB (325 ng L-1 and 683 ng L-1) WWTP "P" and "I" respectively.

The overall percentage removal efficiency for the four WWTPs ranged from 21% to 100%. The biological treatment steps, activated sludge and trickling filters, were effective in removing antibiotics especially with the trickling filter and the impact of the sedimentation stage after activated sludge treatment. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Wastewater, Antibiotics, Online SPE-LC/MS-MS, Microwave extraction
National Category
Water Treatment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160266 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.410 (DOI)000468618900002 ()31075576 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015 - 0334
Available from: 2019-06-18 Created: 2019-06-18 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Östman, M., Björlenius, B., Fick, J. & Tysklind, M. (2019). Effect of full-scale ozonation and pilot-scale granular activated carbon on the removal of biocides, antimycotics and antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant. Science of the Total Environment, 649, 1117-1123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of full-scale ozonation and pilot-scale granular activated carbon on the removal of biocides, antimycotics and antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant
2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 649, p. 1117-1123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several micropollutants show low removal efficiencies in conventional sewage treatment plants, and therefore enter the aquatic environment. To reduce the levels of micropollutants in sewage effluent, and thereby the effects on biota, a number of extra treatment steps are currently being evaluated. Two such techniques are ozonation and adsorption onto activated carbon. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of Sweden's first full-scale ozonation treatment plant at removing a number of antibiotics, antimycotics and biocides. The effect of adding granular activated carbon (GAC) on a pilot scale and pilot-scale ozonation were also evaluated. The conventional treatment (13,000 PE) with the add-on of full-scale ozonation (0.55 g O3/g Total organic carbon (TOC)) was able to remove most of the studied compounds (>90%), except for benzotriazoles and fluconazole (<50%). Adsorption on GAC on a pilot scale showed a higher removal efficiency than ozonation (>80% for all studied compounds). Three types of GAC were evaluated and shown to have different removal efficiencies. In particular, the GAC with the smallest particle sizes exhibited the highest removal efficiency. The results demonstrate that it is important to select an appropriate type of carbon to achieve the removal goal for specific target compounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Biocides, Antibiotics, Ozonation, GAC, Removal efficiency, Wastewater
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151966 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.382 (DOI)000446076500106 ()2-s2.0-85052640940 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Agency for Marine and Water Management
Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Lagesson, A., Saaristo, M., Brodin, T., Fick, J., Klaminder, J., Martin, J. M. & Wong, B. B. (2019). Fish on steroids: Temperature-dependent effects of 17 beta-trenbolone on predator escape, boldness, and exploratory behaviors. Environmental Pollution, 245, 243-252
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fish on steroids: Temperature-dependent effects of 17 beta-trenbolone on predator escape, boldness, and exploratory behaviors
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 245, p. 243-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hormonal growth promoters (HGPs), widely used in beef cattle production globally, make their way into the environment as agricultural effluent with potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems. One MPG of particular concern is 17 beta-trenbolone, which is persistent in freshwater habitats and can affect the development, morphology and reproductive behaviors of aquatic organisms. Despite this, few studies have investigated impacts of 17 beta-trenbolone on non-reproductive behaviors linked to growth and survival, like boldness and predator avoidance. None consider the interaction between 17 beta-trenbolone and other environmental stressors, such as temperature, although environmental challenges confronting animals in the wild seldom, if ever, occur in isolation. Accordingly, this study aimed to test the interactive effects of trenbolone and temperature on organismal behavior. To do this, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusio holbrooki) were subjected to an environmentally-relevant concentration of 17 beta-trenbolone (average measured concentration 3.0 +/- 0.2 ng/L) or freshwater (i.e. control) for 21 days under one of two temperatures (20 and 30 degrees C), after which the predator escape, boldness and exploration behavior of fish were tested. Predator escape behavior was assayed by subjecting fish to a simulated predator strike, while boldness and exploration were assessed in a separate maze experiment. We found that trenbolone exposure increased boldness behavior. Interestingly, some behavioral effects of trenbolone depended on temperature, sex, or both. Specifically, significant effects of trenbolone on male predator escape behavior were only noted at 30 degrees C, with males becoming less reactive to the simulated threat. Further, in the maze experiment, trenbolone-exposed fish explored the maze faster than control fish, but only at 20 degrees C. We conclude that field detected concentrations of 17 beta-trenbolone can impact ecologically important behaviors of fish, and such effects can be temperature dependent. Such findings underscore the importance of considering the potentially interactive effects of other environmental stressors when investigating behavioral effects of environmental contaminants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Anti-predator behavior, Behavioral ecoroxicology, Endocrine disrupting chemicals, Synthetic androgenic anabolic steroid, Temperature
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162768 (URN)10.1016/j.envpol.2018.10.116 (DOI)000457511900026 ()30423539 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Andersson, M., Fick, J., Brodin, T., Klaminder, J. & Piovano, S. (2019). High-speed imaging reveals how antihistamine exposure affects escape behaviours in aquatic insect prey. Science of the Total Environment, 648, 1257-1262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-speed imaging reveals how antihistamine exposure affects escape behaviours in aquatic insect prey
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 648, p. 1257-1262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquatic systems receive a wide range of pharmaceuticals that may have adverse impacts on aquatic wildlife. Among these pharmaceuticals, antihistamines are commonly found, and these substances have the potential to influence the physiology of aquatic invertebrates. Previous studies have focused on how antihistamines may affect behaviours of aquatic invertebrates, but these studies probably do not capture the full consequences of antihistamine exposure, as traditional recording techniques do not capture important animal movements occurring at the scale of milliseconds, such as prey escape responses. In this study, we investigated if antihistamine exposure can impact escape responses in aquatic insect, by exposing damselfly (Coenagrion hastulatum) larvae to two environmentally relevant concentrations (0.1 and 1 μg L−1) of diphenhydramine. Importantly, we used a high-speed imaging approach that with high-time resolution captures details of escape responses and, thus, potential impacts of diphenhydramine on these behaviours. Our results show overall weak effects of antihistamine exposure on the escape behaviours of damselfly larvae. However, at stage 2 of the C-escape response, we found a significant increase in turning angle, which corresponds to a reduced swimming velocity, indicating a reduced success at evading a predator attack. Thus, we show that low concentrations of an antihistamine may affect behaviours strongly related to fitness of aquatic insect prey – effects would have been overlooked using traditional recording techniques. Hence, to understand the full consequences of pharmaceutical contamination on aquatic wildlife, high-speed imaging should be incorporated into future environmental risk assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Damselfly larvae, Diphenhydramine, Escape response, Pharmaceutical pollution
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150912 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.226 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052146409 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
McCallum, E., Sundelin, A., Fick, J., Alanärä, A., Klaminder, J., Hellström, G. & Brodin, T. (2019). Investigating tissue bioconcentration and the behavioural effects of two pharmaceutical pollutants on sea trout (Salmo trutta) in the laboratory and field. Aquatic Toxicology, 207, 170-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating tissue bioconcentration and the behavioural effects of two pharmaceutical pollutants on sea trout (Salmo trutta) in the laboratory and field
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2019 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 207, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pharmaceuticals entering aquatic ecosystems via wastewater effluents are of increasing concern for wild animals. Because some pharmaceuticals are designed to modulate human behaviour, measuring the impacts of exposure to pharmaceuticals on fish behaviour has become a valuable endpoint. While laboratory studies have shown that pharmaceuticals can affect fish behaviour, there is a lack of understanding if behaviour is similarly affected in natural environments. Here, we exposed sea trout (Salmo trutta) smolts to two concentrations of two pharmaceutical pollutants often detected in surface waters: temazepam (a benzodiazepine, anxiolytic) or irbesartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker, anti-hypertensive). We tested the hypothesis that changes to behavioural traits (anxiety and activity) measured in laboratory trials following exposure are predictive of behaviour in the natural environment (downstream migration). Measures of anxiety and activity in the laboratory assay did not vary with temazepam treatment, but temazepam-exposed fish began migrating faster in the field. Activity in the laboratory assay did predict overall migration speed in the field. In contrast to temazepam, we found that irbesartan exposure did not affect behaviour in the laboratory, field, or the relationship between the two end-points. However, irbesartan was also not readily taken up into fish tissue (i.e. below detection levels in the muscle tissue), while temazepam bioconcentrated (bioconcentration factor 7.68) rapidly (t(1/2) < 24 h). Our findings add to a growing literature showing that benzodiazepine pollutants can modulate fish behaviour and that laboratory assays may be less sensitive at detecting the effects of pollutants compared to measuring effects in natural settings. Therefore, we underscore the importance of measuring behavioural effects in the natural environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Ecotoxicology, Scototaxis, Steady-state, In situ, Bioconcentration
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162518 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2018.11.028 (DOI)000457659300019 ()30576864 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Klaminder, J., Jonsson, M., Leander, J., Fahlman, J., Brodin, T., Fick, J. & Hellström, G. (2019). Less anxious salmon smolt become easy prey during downstream migration. Science of the Total Environment, 687, 488-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Less anxious salmon smolt become easy prey during downstream migration
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 687, p. 488-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hatchery-reared salmon smolt used for supplementary stocking often display poor migration behavior compared to wild smolt, which reduces the success of this management action. Oxazepam, an anxiolytic drug, has been shown to intensify salmon smolt migration in mesocosm experiments, and treatment with this drug has, therefore, been suggested as a management option to improve downstream smolt migration. In this study, we tested this by assessing migration performance of hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolt along a 21-km long natural river-to-sea migration route in a boreal river in Northern Sweden. Using acoustic telemetry, the migration rate and survival of smolt that had been exposed to oxazepam (200 mu g L-1, N = 20) was monitored and compared with a control group (N = 20) of unexposed smolt. Exposed smolt took significantly longer time to initiate migration after release compared to the control fish, but after that we observed no significant difference in downstream migration speed. However, exposed smolt had considerably higher probability of being predated on compared to control smolt. We attribute these results to increased risk-taking and higher activity in oxazepam-exposed smolt, which in turn increased initial non-directional exploratory behavior and decreased predator vigilance. These results are discussed based on current concerns for ecological implications of behavioral modifications induced by pharmaceutical pollution and climate change. We conclude that exposure to oxazepam is an unsuitable management option to prime migration of reared salmon in natural systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Pharmaceutical, Behavior, Ecosystem experiment, Predator-prey, GABAergicD
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162828 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.488 (DOI)000480316300051 ()31212157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
McCallum, E., Cerveny, D., Fick, J. & Brodin, T. (2019). Slow-Release Implants for Manipulating Contaminant Exposures in Aquatic Wildlife: A New Tool for Field Ecotoxicology. Environmental Science and Technology, 53(14), 8282-8290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Slow-Release Implants for Manipulating Contaminant Exposures in Aquatic Wildlife: A New Tool for Field Ecotoxicology
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 14, p. 8282-8290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Field-based ecotoxicology studies are invaluable for uncovering the effects of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) on aquatic organisms. However, large-scale exposures are still very rare due to prohibitive costs, the availability of replicated habitats, and the potential for exposure to cause lasting damage to the environment. Here, we evaluated the viability of internal slow-release implants as an alternative method for manipulating CEC exposures in aquatic wildlife using two fat-based carriers (coconut oil and vegetable shortening). We treated roach (Rutilus rutilus) with implants containing a high (50 mu g/g), low (25 mu g/g), or control (0 mu g/g) concentration of the behavior-modifying pharmaceutical oxazepam. We then measured oxazepam uptake in four tissues (plasma, muscle, liver, and the brain) over 1 month. The two carriers released oxazepam differently: coconut oil was the superior implant type because it delivered a more consistent dose across time, while vegetable shortening released oxazepam rapidly at the start of the exposure period. For both carriers and treatments, the brain and liver contained the most oxazepam. Overall, the method is a promising technique for controlled manipulations of pharmaceuticals in fish, and we have provided some of the first data on the suitability and contaminant release kinetics from different implant types.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2019
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161998 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.9b01975 (DOI)000476685500038 ()31067036 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Flach, C.-F., Genheden, M., Fick, J. & Larsson, D. G. (2018). A comprehensive screening of Escherichia coli isolates from Scandinavia's largest sewage treatment plant indicates no selection for antibiotic resistance. Environmental Science and Technology, 52(19), 11419-11428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comprehensive screening of Escherichia coli isolates from Scandinavia's largest sewage treatment plant indicates no selection for antibiotic resistance
2018 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 52, no 19, p. 11419-11428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is concern that sewage treatment plants (STPs) serve as hotspots for emergence and selection of antibiotic resistant bacteria. However, field studies investigating resistance selection by comparing bacterial populations in influents and effluents have produced variable and sometimes contradictive results. Also, large taxonomic changes between influents and effluents make interpretation of studies measuring relative gene abundances ambiguous. The aim here was to investigate whether within-species selection occurs by conducting a comprehensive screening of Escherichia coli isolated from composite influent and effluent samples collected at Scandinavia's largest STP, accompanied by analyses of antibiotics residues. In total, 4028 isolates, collected on eight occasions during 18 months, were screened for resistance to seven antibiotics. Although differences in proportions of resistant E. coli between influent and effluent samples were detected for a few antibiotics on two occasions, aggregated data over time showed no such differences for any of the investigated antibiotics. Neither was there any enrichment of multiresistant or extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing isolates through the treatment process. Despite some antibiotics were detected at or close to concentrations predicted to provide some selective pressure, field observations of resistance profiles in E. coli do not provide support for systematic selection in the investigated STP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
National Category
Water Treatment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152874 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.8b03354 (DOI)000446542100057 ()30215260 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 219-2014-1575Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-750Swedish Research Council, 2015-02492
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Projects
Occurrence and fate of the antiviral drug Oseltamivir in aquatic environments and the effect on resistance development in influenza A viruses [2008-1239_Formas]; Umeå UniversityNovel Strategies to Reduce Diffuse Emissions of Micropollutants from On-Site Sewage Facilities [2012-2101_Formas]; Umeå UniversityPharmaceuticals in aquatic systems: changing natural ecosystems through altered species interactions [2013-734_Formas]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3949-7371

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