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Adjei, E., Eriksson, R., Lindgren, U. & Holm, E. (2019). Familial relationships and firm performance: the impact of entrepreneurial family relationships. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 31(5-6), 357-377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Familial relationships and firm performance: the impact of entrepreneurial family relationships
2019 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 31, no 5-6, p. 357-377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the family may serve as a resource for entrepreneurs, it has been studied separately in different disciplines. In this paper, we combine the arguments on familial relationships (family firm literature) and skill variety (regional learning literature) to analyse how different forms of entrepreneurial family relationships (co-occurrences) facilitate firm performance, and how familial relationships moderate the effects of skill variety on firm performance. Using longitudinal data (2002-2012) on a sample of privately owned firms with up to 50 employees with matched information on all employees, our results show that entrepreneur children relationship is the dominant dyad familial relationship in family firms. The fixed effects estimates demonstrate that entrepreneurial family relationships do affect firm performance but that this is dependent on the type of familial relationship. Children and spouses show a positive relationship with firm performance while siblings of the entrepreneur show no significant relationship with performance. The estimates further indicate that familial relationships involving spouses abate the negative effects of having too similar or too different types of skills. The paper thus contributes to new knowledge regarding not only whether family relationships matter for performance, but also in what way they matter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
entrepreneur, family relationships, trust, skill variety, firm performance
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Business Administration
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143913 (URN)10.1080/08985626.2018.1514074 (DOI)000465888000002 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 13-1044:1
Note

Originally included in thesis in submitted form.

Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Östbring, L., Eriksson, R. & Lindgren, U. (2018). Relatedness through experience: on the importance of collected worker experiences for plant performance. Papers in regional science (Print), 97(3), 501-518
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relatedness through experience: on the importance of collected worker experiences for plant performance
2018 (English)In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 501-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We demonstrate that multiple cognitive dimensions exist between employees in knowledge intensive business services (KIBS) and that these dimensions interact in their influence on plant performance. Knowledge and cognitive distance are measured as formal knowledge and industry experience. Pooled OLS regressions with year, industry, and region-fixed effects are used to estimate the impact on plant performance. The results suggest that the commonly found negative impact of similarity in formal knowledge on plant performance may be reduced by high human capital ratios or high levels of similarity in experience. Moreover, the organizational structures associated with single-plant and multi-plant firms, generate different plant performance outcomes of knowledge variety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
Cognitive proximity, worker experience, human capital, plant performance, KIBS
National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100917 (URN)10.1111/pirs.12273 (DOI)000441754500003 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Jansson, J., Pettersson, T., Mannberg, A., Brännlund, R. & Lindgren, U. (2017). Adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: Influence from neighbors, family and coworkers. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 54, 61-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: Influence from neighbors, family and coworkers
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2017 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 54, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last years, many governments have set targets for increasing the share of biofuels in the transportation sector. Understanding consumer behavior is essential in designing policies that efficiently increase the uptake of cleaner technologies. In this paper we analyze adopters and non-adopters of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). We use diffusion of innovation theory and the established notion that the social system and interpersonal influence play important roles in adoption. Based on a nationwide database of car owners we analyze interpersonal influence on adoption from three social domains: neighbors, family and coworkers. The results point primarily at a neighbor effect in that AFV adoption is more likely if neighbors also have adopted. The results also point at significant effects of interpersonal influence from coworkers and family members but these effects weaken or disappear when income, education level, marriage, age, gender and green party votes are controlled for. The results extend the diffusion of innovation and AFV literature with empirical support for interpersonal influence based on objective data where response bias is not a factor. Implications for further research, environmental and transport policy, and practitioners are discussed.

Keywords
Adoption, Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), Interpersonal influence, Neighbor effect, Diffusion of innovation theory
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economic Geography Social Psychology
Research subject
consumer behavior; marketing; sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135026 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2017.04.012 (DOI)000405976700005 ()881251-881253 (Local ID)881251-881253 (Archive number)881251-881253 (OAI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P11-0339
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Lindgren, U., Ivarsson, A. & Ng, N. (2017). Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?. Paper presented at 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl_3), 41-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 41-41Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Child health inequalities can be explained by social determinants of health, including neighborhood social capital. Swedish research about place effects on children's health is limited. This project aims to contribute to knowledge on how neighborhood social capital may influence child health in the Swedish context. The overall research questions were: What is the incidence rate of child injuries in the living environments among boys and girls? What are the associations between neighborhood social capital and child injuries?

Methods: Child injury data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab were utilized, with data from all children 0-12 years of age, living in Umeå municipality during 2006-2009. Individual child injury and residential area data were linked to a neighborhood social capital index, where 49 defined neighborhoods were assigned a score from low- high in social capital, based on people’s perceptions about their neighborhoods. Individual, household and neighborhood demographic and socioeconomic variables (country of birth, educational level, income and family type) were also extracted from the Umeå SIMSAM lab. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze factors associated with child injury.

Results: We observed 3930 injury events that occurred in the living environments, experienced by 24 000 children who lived in 14 767 households within 49 neighborhoods. The incidence rate of child injuries was about 72.5/1000 for boys and 60/1000 for girls. The odds for child injures was lower in neighborhoods with high social capital compared to neighborhoods with low social capital (OR 0.87 95%CI 0.80-0.95) after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighborhood level. The protective effects of neighborhood social capital were stronger for girls than boys.

Conclusions: Neighborhood social capital may have a protective effect on child injuries and especially so for girls.

Key messages:

  • Neighborhood conditions have a significant influence on child health inequalities in the Swedish context, including inequalities in child injuries.
  • Mobilization of neighborhood social capital might be good investment for reducing child injuries.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143148 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.104 (DOI)000414389800084 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Conference
10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Chaparro, M. P., de Luna, X., Häggström, J., Ivarsson, A., Lindgren, U., Nilsson, K. & Koupil, I. (2017). Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 45(5), 511-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 511-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate whether women's adult overweight and obesity risk was associated with their childhood family structure, measured as their mothers' marital status history, during the women's first 18 years of life.

METHODS: Using linked register data, we analyzed 30,584 primiparous women born in Sweden in 1975 who were between 19-35 years of age when their height and pre-pregnancy weight was recorded. The outcomes were women's overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and the predictor was mothers' marital status history, which was summarized using sequence analysis. We carried out nested logistic regression models adjusting for women's age and maternal sociodemographic characteristics.

RESULTS: Mothers' marital status history was summarized into six clusters: stable marriage, stable cohabitation, married then divorcing, cohabiting then separating, varied transitions, and not with father. In fully adjusted models and compared with women whose mothers belonged to the stable marriage cluster: (1) women whose mothers belonged to the other marital status clusters had higher odds of overweight/obesity (odds ratio (OR) ranging 1.15-1.19; p < 0.05); and (2) women whose mothers belonged to the stable cohabitation (OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.52), cohabiting then separating (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.01-1.49), varied transitions (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.11-1.39), and not with father (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.00-1.54) clusters had higher odds of obesity.

CONCLUSIONS: Women whose mothers were not in stable marriage relationships had higher odds of being overweight or obese in adulthood. The finding that even women raised in the context of stable cohabitation had higher odds of being overweight or obese is intriguing as these relationships are socially accepted in Sweden.

Keywords
family structure, marital status, overweight, obesity, Sweden, sequence analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135030 (URN)10.1177/1403494817705997 (DOI)000404652000007 ()28482752 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, U., Borggren, J., Karlsson, S., Eriksson, R. H. & Timmermans, B. (2017). Is there an end to the concentration of businesses and people?. In: E. Carina H. Keskitalo (Ed.), Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition (pp. 139-181). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there an end to the concentration of businesses and people?
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2017 (English)In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 139-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is extensive literature describing the mechanisms of economic growth, which has tended to occur in big cities. The emergence of knowledge economies has enhanced the importance of human capital - the success of companies is increasingly dependent on employees' ability to transform their knowledge and skills into new products that can satisfy rapidly changing demand from all over the world. This transformation of the economy creates major challenges for regions that do not have large, well-educated populations. Will rural areas stand a chance against the centripetal forces of agglomeration economies? This issue is addressed by focusing attention on a number of successful, forest-related companies running their operations far from metropolitan Sweden. This presentation is accompanied by a theoretical discussion that challenges the urban assumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143482 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-57116-8_5 (DOI)881251 (Local ID)978-1-137-57115-1 (ISBN)978-1-137-57116-8 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
PLURAL Planning for rural-urban dynamics: living and acting at several places
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Östbring, L., Eriksson, R. & Lindgren, U. (2017). Labor mobility and organizational proximity: routines as supporting mechanisms for variety, skill integration and productivity. Industry and Innovation, 24(8), 775-794
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labor mobility and organizational proximity: routines as supporting mechanisms for variety, skill integration and productivity
2017 (English)In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 775-794Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to introduce an organisational dimension to the discussion of knowledge flows and relatedness. We hypothesise that not only the degree of technological relatedness influence the extent of skill integration in a firm but also that familiarity with firm routines (intra-organisational proximity) should smoothen absorption. Longitudinal micro-data are used in pooled ordinary least square- and fixed effect models to estimate the impact on plant productivity growth of 18,051 labour flows within, and to, four large Swedish firms between 2003 and 2006. Our findings suggest that intra-regional related flows are economically beneficial. Their link to localised capabilities and community creates a weaker but more productive link between individuals than do organisational proximity, which generate too much similarity to allow for cognitively related inflows to impact productivity growth. Also, we find a positive relationship between unrelated flows and plant performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
Keywords
organisational proximity, firm routines, labour mobility, plant performance, related variety
National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100916 (URN)10.1080/13662716.2017.1295362 (DOI)000410776400001 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-03-13 Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Keskitalo, E. C., Karlsson, S., Lindgren, U., Pettersson, Ö., Lundmark, L., Slee, B., . . . Feliciano, D. (2017). Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship. In: E. Carina H. Keskitalo (Ed.), Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition (pp. 183-224). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship
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2017 (English)In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 183-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter describes how understandings of the "rural" have progressed from a focus on either decline or amenity, whereby these more simplified understandings can be seen to have had an impact on rural policy development. The chapter argues that rural areas, including forests, need to be understood in relation to both production and integration with urban landscapes. It thus illustrates the role of both historical processes and policy in creating current understandings of the rural: drawing upon an example from the Swedish case, it amongst others shows that a redistributive tax system has played a larger and more crucial role than rural policy in retaining active rural areas in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143483 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-57116-8_6 (DOI)881251 (Local ID)978-1-137-57115-1 (ISBN)978-1-137-57116-8 (ISBN)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
PLURAL Planning for rural-urban dynamics: living and acting at several places
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, U., Nilsson, K., de Luna, X. & Ivarsson, A. (2016). Data Resource Profile: Swedish Microdata Research from Childhood into Lifelong Health and Welfare (Umeå SIMSAM Lab). International Journal of Epidemiology, 45(4), 1075-1075g
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data Resource Profile: Swedish Microdata Research from Childhood into Lifelong Health and Welfare (Umeå SIMSAM Lab)
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1075-1075gArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120349 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyv358 (DOI)000393182000020 ()27170765 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-05-16 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Borggren, J., Eriksson, R. & Lindgren, U. (2016). Knowledge flows in high-impact firms: how does relatedness influence survival, acquisition and exit?. Journal of Economic Geography, 16(3), 637-665
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge flows in high-impact firms: how does relatedness influence survival, acquisition and exit?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 637-665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following the impact on regional renewal and employment ascribed to rapidly growing firms (high-impactfirms, HIFs), this paper argues that little is still known in economic geography and business studies todayregarding the mechanisms influencing growth of such firms and, hence, the potential impact on regionalemployment. The aim of this paper is thus to explore how the qualitative content of skills (i.e. the degree ofsimilarity, relatedness and unrelatedness) recruited to a firm during a period of fast growth influences itsfuture success. Our findings, based on a sample of 1,589 HIFs in the Swedish economy, suggest that it is notonly the number of people employed that matters in aiding the understanding of the future destiny of the firms– but also, more importantly, it is the scope of the skills recruited and their proximity to related industries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2016
Keywords
high-impact firms, skills, relatedness, labor flows
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101766 (URN)10.1093/jeg/lbv014 (DOI)000377470400004 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Note

First published online: May 15, 2015

Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
Labour mobility and firm performance - The importance of labour market externalities and geographical proximity [2010-01597_VR]; Umeå UniversityWho is driving eco cars? The importance of social domains, economic incentives and geographical location [P11-0339:1_RJ]; Umeå UniversityThe Umeå SIMSAM Lab - Infrastructure for Microdata Research from Childhood into Lifelong Health and Welfare [IN16-0368:1_RJ]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2796-3547

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