umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Landstedt, Evelina
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Zetterström Dahlqvist, H., Landstedt, E. & Gillander Gådin, K. (2018). A Latent Class Analysis of Violence Multi-Victimization in Youth. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 483-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Latent Class Analysis of Violence Multi-Victimization in Youth
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 483-484Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Violence among youth is common and has been linked to poor mental health outcomes. There is some evidence that there are groups of youth who are victims of more than one form of violence but more knowledge is needed in terms of patterning of subgroups of multiple violence victimization.

Aim: To explore if there are distinct subgroups of youth with particular patterns of violence victimization.

Methods: Survey data from a Swedish sample (n = 1,569) of youth 14-16 years old were used (females 48.4%). Using a broad definition of violence, respondents indicated if they had experienced physical violence, threat of physical violence, bullying, sexual harassment, cyber bullying, online sexual victimizayion, and other adverse sexual experience in the past six months as well as lifetime physical violence victimization. Distinct subgroups of youth within the data set with particular patterns of violence victimization were identified using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). Model fit was assessed using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), with smaller values indicating better model fit.

Results: Preliminary results show three distinct subgroups: 1. Sexualized violence off- and online (girls 66.6%), 2. Bullying only (girls 47.5%) and 3. Multi-victimization including threat of physical violence, violence in the past six months and lifetime, sexual harassment on- and offline, bullying on- and offline as well as other adverse sexual experience (girls 47.6%).

Conclusions: Three distinct subgroups of violence victimization in a sample of 14-16 year old youth was evident in the data. There was a greater representation of girls in the sexualized violence sub-group. Further research as well as preventive programs should acknowledge that many young people are victims of several types of violence. Future research should also investigate the implications of multi-victimization on mental health outcomes.

Key messages:

  • Three distinct subgroups of violence victimization was present in the data: 1. Sexualized violence off- and online 2. Bullying only and 3. Multi-victimization.

  • While the gendered pattern of the Bullying only and Multi-victimization subgroups were fairly balanced, a substantially greater proportion of girls were represented in the Sexualized violence group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157985 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky218.218 (DOI)000461384202204 ()
Note

Supplement 4

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Landstedt, E., Hammarström, A., Fairweather-Schmidt, A. K. & Wade, T. (2018). Associations between adolescent risk for restrictive disordered eating and long-term outcomes related to somatic symptoms, body mass index, and poor well-being. British Journal of Health Psychology, 23(2), 496-518
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between adolescent risk for restrictive disordered eating and long-term outcomes related to somatic symptoms, body mass index, and poor well-being
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-107X, E-ISSN 2044-8287, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 496-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To date, no longitudinal, community-based studies have examined the association between disordered eating emerging in adolescence and long-term physical well-being. This study sought to explore the longitudinal associations between risk for restrictive disordered eating (DE-R; those not presenting with binge-purge symptoms) in adolescence and trajectories of functional somatic symptoms (FSS) and body mass index (BMI), and several indicators of poor physical well-being across early- to mid-adulthood, including medication, number of doctor visits, and sick leave. Design: Data were obtained from the Northern Swedish Cohort Study (N=1,001), a prospective longitudinal study including four time points from age 16 to 42 years. Methods: A cumulative measure of DE-R risk was computed. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify subpopulation trajectories of FSS and BMI. The three-step method for auxiliary variables and logistic regressions were used to assess associations between DE-R and the trajectory classes as well as indicators of poorphysical well-being. ResultsThree trajectories were identified for FSS. A gender by BMI interaction led to a classification of four BMI trajectories in men, but three in women. The presence of DE-R risk in adolescence increased odds of unfavourable FSS development, increasing BMI in women, and continually low BMI in men. Indicators of poor physical well-being at ages 21, 30, and 42years were associated with DE-R risk in adolescence. Conclusions: Data spanning nearly three decades suggest that physical well-being impairment is related to DE-R risk measured earlier in life, underscoring the urgency for targeted, gender-sensitive preventive interventions for teenagers. What is already known on this subject? Disordered eating is linked to poor physical and mental well-being and quality of life. No longitudinal studies have examined long-term physical well-being consequences of adolescent disordered eating risk. What does this study add? Non-purging disordered eating symptoms in adolescence predict adverse physical well-being outcomes in middle-aged men and women. Targeted interventions and preventative work during adolescence are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
disordered eating, longitudinal, adolescence, quality of life, body mass index, youth, cohort study, ychosomatic health
National Category
Psychiatry Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147290 (URN)10.1111/bjhp.12301 (DOI)000428990500016 ()29457326 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Landstedt, E. & San Sebastian, M. (2018). Complex inequalities of gender and social class in daily smoking among Swedish men and women. Paper presented at 11th European Public Health Conference Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018.. European Journal of Public Health, 28, 325-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex inequalities of gender and social class in daily smoking among Swedish men and women
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, p. 325-325Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cigarette smoking is a major public health threat. In high income countries, smoking is most prevalent in disadvantaged groups. Little is known about complex inequalitites in smoking based on multiple axes of social positions which would be necessary in designing interventions aiming at reducing smoking rates. The study aimed to describe the prevalence of daily smoking in the adult Swedish population across combinations of the social positions gender and occupational class, and to examine smoking differences attributed to the intersection of gender/occupational class

Methods: The study sample (N = 61 316, age 26 – 84) was pooled from seven years of the annual cross sectional Swedish national public health surveys (2010 to 2016). The outcome was current daily smoking. Binary variables of gender (man/woman) and occupational class (blue collar/white collar) were used to construct the four category intersection meausure of gender/class. Complex inequalities in daily smoking were estimated by joint-, referent- and excess disparities. Survey year and age were used as covariates.

Results: The overall daily smoking prevalence was 10.21%. The smoking rates in the categories of gender and occupational class were as follows: white collar men: 6.70%; white collar women: 7.79%; blue collar men: 13.75% and blue collar women: 16.63%. The absolute joint disparity was 9.96 percentage points (CI: 9.14 – 10.79) and that the main contributor to this inequality was occupational class (70.66%). The results of excess disparity further showed that blue collar women were particularly exposed regarding smoking.

Conclusions: Acknowledging the complexity of disadvantage and privilege regarding daily smoking contributes to an understanding of the situation for multiply marginalised groups, for example blue collar women. The findings may inform future public health interventions to reduce smoking habits.

Key messages:

  • Acknowledging the complexity of disadvantage and privilege contributes to an understanding of daily smoking across multiply marginalised groups.

  • Blue collar women is a particularly important group to consider in public health efforts to reduce smoking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
smoking, social class, gender
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157987 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky214.048 (DOI)000461384201284 ()
Conference
11th European Public Health Conference Winds of change: towards new ways of improving public health in Europe Ljubljana, Slovenia, 28 November–1 December, 2018.
Note

Supplement 4

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Almquist, Y. B., Landstedt, E., Jackisch, J., Rajaleid, K., Westerlund, H. & Hammarstrom, A. (2018). Prevailing over Adversity: Factors Counteracting the Long-Term Negative Health Influences of Social and Material Disadvantages in Youth. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(9), Article ID 1842.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevailing over Adversity: Factors Counteracting the Long-Term Negative Health Influences of Social and Material Disadvantages in Youth
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 1842Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disadvantaged circumstances in youth tend to translate into poor health development. However, the fact that this is not always the case has been seen as indicative of differential resilience. The current study highlights factors outside the context of the family with the potential to counteract the long-term negative influences of social and material adversity in adolescence on general health status. This study was based on two waves of questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort. From the wave in 1981 (age 16), indicators of social and material conditions as well as factors related to school, peers, and spare time were derived. From the wave in 2008 (age 43), information about self-rated health was used. Ordinal logistic regression models (n = 908) showed that adversity in youth was associated with poorer self-rated health in midlife among men and women alike, net of health status at baseline. However, having an advantaged situation with regard to school, peers, or spare time appeared to protect against the detrimental influences of disadvantaged circumstances in the family context on subsequent health. This suggests that health-promoting interventions may benefit from focusing on contexts outside the family in their effort to strengthen processes of resilience among disadvantaged youths.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
disadvantages, living conditions, longitudinal, resilience, self-rated health, youth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152898 (URN)10.3390/ijerph15091842 (DOI)000445765600051 ()30150519 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-37
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-10-30Bibliographically approved
Dahlqvist, H. Z., Landstedt, E., Almqvist, Y. B. & Gadin, K. G. (2017). A non-randomised pragmatic trial of a school-based group cognitive-behavioural programme for preventing depression in girls. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 76, Article ID 1396146.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A non-randomised pragmatic trial of a school-based group cognitive-behavioural programme for preventing depression in girls
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 76, article id 1396146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the DISA-programme in preventing depressive symptoms (DS) in adolescent girls, as implemented in a real-world school setting, accounting for baseline socioeconomic and psychosocial factors, and to investigate whether the effects of these baseline variables on DS differed between intervention participants and non-participants. In this non-randomised pragmatic trial, an electronic questionnaire was disseminated in 2011 (baseline) and 2012 (follow-up) in schools in one municipality in northern Sweden. Pupils (total n=275; intervention participants identified in the questionnaire: n=53; non-participants: n=222) were 14-15 years old at baseline. The groups were compared by means of SEM. DISA could not predict differences in DS at follow-up in this real-life setting. In the overall sample, sexual harassment victimisation (SH) at baseline was associated with DS at follow-up and the estimate for SH increased in the DISA-participants compared to the overall sample.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
School, depressive symptoms, real-life setting, pragmatic trial, cognitive-behavioural, sexual harassment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143613 (URN)10.1080/22423982.2017.1396146 (DOI)000417206200001 ()29108508 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Almquist, Y. B., Landstedt, E. & Hammarström, A. (2017). Associations between social support and depressive symptoms: social causation or social selection-or both?. European Journal of Public Health, 27(1), 84-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between social support and depressive symptoms: social causation or social selection-or both?
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have demonstrated an association between social support and health, almost regardless of how social support and health have been conceptualised or measured. Even so, the issue of causality has not yet been sufficiently addressed. This issue is particularly challenging for mental health problems such as depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study is to longitudinally assess structural and functional aspects of social support in relation to depressive symptoms in men and women, through a series of competing causal models that, in contrast to many other statistical methods, allow for bi-directional effects.

METHODS: Questionnaire data from the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 1001) were utilised for the years 1995 (age 30) and 2007 (age 42). Associations were analysed by means of gender-specific structural equation modelling, with structural and functional support modelled separately.

RESULTS: Both structural and functional support were associated with depressive symptoms at ages 30 and 42, for men and women alike. A higher level of support, particularly functional support, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms over time among men. Among women, there were bi-directional effects of social support and depressive symptoms over time.

CONCLUSION: Concerning social support and health, the social causation hypothesis seems relevant for men whereas, for women, the associations appear to be more complex. We conclude that preventive and health promoting work may need to consider that the presence of depressive symptoms in itself impedes on women's capability to increase their levels of social support.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127464 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckw120 (DOI)000397046200020 ()27521575 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Almquist, Y. B., Landstedt, E., Jackisch, J., Rajaleid, K., Westerlund, H. & Hammarström, A. (2017). Growing through asphalt: What counteracts the long-term negative health impact of youth adversity?. Paper presented at 10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017. European Journal of Public Health, 27(Suppl_3), 47-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growing through asphalt: What counteracts the long-term negative health impact of youth adversity?
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 47-47Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Adversity in the family of origin tends to translate into poor health development. Yet, the fact that this is not the always the case has been seen an indicator of resilience. The current study highlights factors outside the context of the family with the potential to counteract the long-term negative influences of social and material adversity in adolescence on general health status.

Methods: The study was based on the Northern Swedish Cohort born in 1965 (n = 1,001). Measures of social and material adversity, health, and protective factors related to school, peers, and spare time, were derived from questionnaires distributed to the cohort members and their teachers at age 16. Self-rated health was measured at age 43. The main associations were examined by means of ordinal regression analysis, with the role of the protective factors being assessed through interaction analysis.

Results: Social and material adversity in youth was associated with poorer self-rated health in midlife among males and females alike, net of health status at baseline. However, having an advantaged situation with regard to school, peers, or spare time – particularly in terms of being seen as having good educational and work prospects, as well as a high-quality spare time – appeared to protect against the detrimental influences of disadvantaged circumstances in the family context on subsequent health.

Conclusions: There are several factors outside the context of the family that seemingly have the potential to buffer against the negative health consequences stemming from having experienced a disadvantaged upbringing. Initiatives targeted at increasing academic motivation and commitment as well as social capital and relationships in youth, may here be of particular relevance.

Key messages:

  • While the experience of disadvantageous living conditions in adolescence tends to translate into poor health development across the life course, this is not always the case.
  • Advantages related to school, peers, and spare time have the potential of counteracting the negative health impact of an adverse family context.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143147 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckx187.120 (DOI)000414389800099 ()
Conference
10th European Public Health Conference Sustaining resilient and healthy communities Stockholm, Sweden 1–4 November 2017
Available from: 2017-12-20 Created: 2017-12-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Landstedt, E., Coffey, J., Wyn, J., Cuervo, H. & Woodman, D. (2017). The complex relationship between mental health and social conditions in the lives of young Australians mixing work and study. Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 25(4), 339-358
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The complex relationship between mental health and social conditions in the lives of young Australians mixing work and study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 339-358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Poor mental health in youth has been consistently shown to be rising over the past 20 years. While it is well established that mental health status is associated with social conditions, population-level perspectives make it difficult to identify the complex ways social and structural conditions impact on mental health. Based on longitudinal (mixed method) data, this exploratory longitudinal study aims to study how the life circumstances of education, work and financial situation are related to mental health in young Australians (aged 20-22). Findings show that the combination of study, work and financial hardship can be regarded as a stressor contributing to poor mental health, particularly if experienced over several years, and that those in the middle socio-economic bracket have the worst mental health outcomes. This research has implications for welfare policies and the responsibilities of educational institutions for the welfare of young people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Mental well-being, financial hardship, tertiary study, socio-economic status, young people, youth transitions, life circumstances
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130179 (URN)10.1177/1103308816649486 (DOI)000413523600002 ()
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Landstedt, E. & Coffey, J. (2017). The social context of youth mental health (2ed.). In: A Furlong (Ed.), Routledge handbook of youth and young adulthood: (pp. 346-355). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The social context of youth mental health
2017 (English)In: Routledge handbook of youth and young adulthood / [ed] A Furlong, London: Routledge, 2017, 2, p. 346-355Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2017 Edition: 2
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130180 (URN)9781138804357 (ISBN)9781315753058 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Dahlqvist, H. Z., Landstedt, E., Young, R. & Gådin, K. G. (2016). Dimensions of Peer Sexual Harassment Victimization and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Study in a Swedish Sample. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45(5), 858-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dimensions of Peer Sexual Harassment Victimization and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Study in a Swedish Sample
2016 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 858-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sexual harassment is commonly considered unwanted sexual attention and a form of gender-based violence that can take physical, verbal and visual forms and it is assumed to cause later depression in adolescents. There is a dearth of research explicitly testing this assumption and the directional pathway remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to use a feminist theoretical framework to test competing models in respect of the direction of the relationships between dimensions of peer sexual harassment victimization and dimensions of depressive symptoms from ages 14 to 16 in adolescents. The study also aimed to investigate gender differences in these pathways. Cross-lagged models were conducted using a three-wave (2010, 2011 and 2012) longitudinal study of 2330 students (51 % females) from Sweden, adjusted for social background. Girls subjected to sexual harassment in grade seven continued to experience sexual harassment the following 2 years. There was weaker evidence of repeated experience of sexual harassment among boys. Depressive symptoms were stable over time in both genders. Sexual name-calling was the dimension that had the strongest associations to all dimensions of depressive symptoms irrespective of gender. In girls, name-calling was associated with later somatic symptoms and negative affect, while anhedonia (reduced ability to experience pleasure) preceded later name-calling. Physical sexual harassment had a reciprocal relationship to somatic symptoms in girls. In boys, name-calling was preceded by all dimensions of depressive symptoms. It is an urgent matter to prevent sexual harassment victimization, as it is most likely to both cause depressive symptoms or a reciprocal cycle of victimization and depression symptoms in girls as well as boys.

Keywords
Sexual harassment, Depressive symptoms, Adolescence, Directional pathways, Gender differences
National Category
Gender Studies Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120086 (URN)10.1007/s10964-016-0446-x (DOI)000374067000003 ()26910524 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications