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Jacobsson, M. & Lundin, R. (2019). Guest editorial: World views on projects and society. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 12(2), 238-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guest editorial: World views on projects and society
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 238-241Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This Special Section of International Journal of Managing Projects in Business contains a collection of six articles focusing on various aspects related to the topic of World Views on Projects and Society. Based in the far-reaching projectification of society (Jacobsson and Jałocha, 2018), and the observation that projects of today both shapes and are shaped by society (Packendorff and Lindgren, 2014), the contributing authors of this Special Section were encouraged to address areas of social concern and the framework(s) of ideas and beliefs which form the way in which people interpret the world and interacts within it. The general themes of this Special Section were inspired by ideas presented in the book Managing and working in project society (Lundin et al., 2015; Lundin, 2016). In the call for the Special Section, three interrelated themes were proposed – “World Views on Projects in Society,” “the World of Projects in Society” and “the Role of Projects in the World” – which together opened up for a broad understanding of the projectification trend which is spreading throughout most parts of society and the world today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160172 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-06-2019-285 (DOI)000479290200001 ()
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Gaim, M., Wåhlin, N. & Jacobsson, M. (2019). The role of space for a paradoxical way of thinking and doing: a study of idea work in architectural firms. Creativity and Innovation Management, 28(2), 265-281
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of space for a paradoxical way of thinking and doing: a study of idea work in architectural firms
2019 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 265-281Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well established that engaging paradoxes and the role of space are important aspects of idea work. Although the significance has been recognized, studies that focus on the intersection between space and paradox are scarce. Accordingly, this article explores the intersection and focuses on the role of space in idea work characterized by paradoxes. More specifically, the aim of this article is twofold. First, the article aims at identifying the spatial conditions that enable organization members to think and act paradoxically. Second, the article aims at exploring how spatial conditions evoke a paradoxical way of thinking and doing. Based on three Scandinavian architectural firms, and through abductive inference, four spatial conditions are identified and outlined. The conditions are conceptualized as organized chaos, boundary(less)ness, premeditated spontaneity, and (re)framing. From the results, and through the discussion, the notion of “generative space” is introduced to explain the overall importance of spatiality, as well as how the interrelatedness of the conditions facilitates a paradoxical way of thinking and doing in idea work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151500 (URN)10.1111/caim.12288 (DOI)000469267200011 ()
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Hällgren, M. & Jacobsson, M. (2019). Using retrospective data to study extreme contexts: the case of impromptu teams. In: SAGE research methods cases: (pp. 1-9). London: Sage Publications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using retrospective data to study extreme contexts: the case of impromptu teams
2019 (English)In: SAGE research methods cases, London: Sage Publications, 2019, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This teaching case focuses on challenges and opportunities of studying extreme contexts in general and the use of retrospective data in particular. The case takes its start in a retrospective case study of the fatal 1996 Mount Everest climbing incident. Based in the case description, the research design of the article, and the practical execution, a number of challenging areas and important lessons with respect to studying extreme contexts are outlined. By working with the method case, we expect students to further their ability to assess the main benefits and challenges when studying extreme contexts, discuss the appropriateness of possible methods when studying extreme contexts, analyze the use of method applied to a specific extreme context, and critically examine the use of method applied to this specific (extreme) case.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2019
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154913 (URN)10.4135/9781526477989 (DOI)9781526477989 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Merschbrock, C. (2018). BIM coordinators: a review. Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, 25(8), 989-1008
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BIM coordinators: a review
2018 (English)In: Engineering Construction and Architectural Management, ISSN 0969-9988, E-ISSN 1365-232X, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 989-1008Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role, practices and responsibilities of building information modeling (BIM) coordinators (BCs).

Design/methodology/approach: The aim is achieved through a review of existing publications (n = 183) in which the term “BIM coordinators” has been described and discussed (n = 78), complemented by interviews with four Norwegian BIM experts.

Findings: The findings from the review indicate that the core responsibilities of BCs involve clash detection, managing information flows and communication flows, monitoring and coordinating design changes, supporting new working procedures and technical development and acting as a boundary spanner. The complementary interview study extends these findings with two additional practices and a reflection on the experienced challenges, obstacles and potential future development of the role. In essence, the authors propose that the role of BCs can be defined as being responsible for external/internal alignment and coordination of actor needs, and engaged in product-, process- and system-oriented practices of BIM.

Research limitations/implications: Given that this study is primarily an integrative literature review of BCs, it has the limitations common with such an approach. Therefore, future studies should preferably extend presented findings through either a survey, further in-depth interviews with BCs or reviews of closely related BIM specialist roles such as BIM managers or BIM technicians.

Practical implications: With BCs seemingly being central to information management and knowledge domain integration within the architecture, engineering and construction industry, an understanding of their importance and role should be of interest to anyone seeking to tap into the potential of BIM. This paper outlines specific implications for construction manager, educators and BCs.

Originality/value: The value of this study lies primarily in the fact that it is the first thorough investigation of the role, practices and responsibilities of BCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Information systems, Project management, Building information modelling, Integrated practice
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151915 (URN)10.1108/ECAM-03-2017-0050 (DOI)000445060900002 ()2-s2.0-85053477804 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. L. (2018). Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?. Business Horizons, 61(1), 47-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?
2018 (English)In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 47-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What's past is prologue. Or is it? The construction of the Empire State Building (ESB) was not only the fastest erection of a skyscraper ever, but the construction company that took on the job allegedly began with no equipment or supplies that would be adequate for the job. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget; instead of 1 year and 6 months as anticipated, it only took 1 year and 45 days. The costs totaled $24.7 million instead of the estimated $43 million. So, we ask, how was this possible and is there something we could learn? Based on a review of existing literature describing the history and construction of the ESB, we outline strategic, operational, and contextual explanations for what appears to be a truly successful megaproject. We illustrate how, for example, inspiration from Henry Ford's assembly line technique, the uniqueness of the logistics during the construction period, the economic decline of the Depression, and early ideas of concurrent engineering and fast-track construction enabled the success. Our conclusion is that there are lessons to be learned in going back to basics when tackling a megaproject.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Empire State Building, Megaprojects, Project management, Empire State Realty Trust
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142420 (URN)10.1016/j.bushor.2017.09.004 (DOI)000423637100006 ()
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. (2018). Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten. PM World Journal, VII(VII), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten
2018 (English)In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. VII, no VII, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

“I do believe in fairies! I do! I do!!” (Peter Pan)

In the 1905 play “Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up”, Sir James Matthew Barrie described how Peter Pan, through his strong beliefs, brought the fairy Tinkerbell back to life. In this short essay, we aim to initiate discussions on the role of strong beliefs and the so-called “Tinkerbell effect” in upholding taken-for-granted assumptions within the construction industry.

As the basis for the discussion, the essay reports on a recently published journal article in Business Horizons entitled “Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: Have we forgotten something?” (Jacobsson and Wilson, 2018). Presently the article is also sold as a case study and teaching case by Harvard Business Review. (The case study can be accessed at https://tinyurl.com/HBRcasestudy and the teaching case at https://tinyurl.com/HBPEcase)

Keywords
Projects, Empire State Building, Construction, Project Management, Mega projects
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150124 (URN)
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Lindbergh, L., Jacobsson, M., Olofsson, T. & Wilson, T. (2017). Public Housing in Sweden: The Umeå Two-Step. In: : . Paper presented at NFF 2017: The 24th Nordic Academy of Management Conference, Bodø, Norway, August 23-25, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public Housing in Sweden: The Umeå Two-Step
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Comparative housing analyses often find that Swedish public housing represents an interesting story because it provides a good class of rental housing to all sections of the population. This approach has been called the “Swedish public housing model”. An in-depth case study has been used to develop a system-wide understanding of a participant’s involvement in its housing market. In this case study, the public utility/energy and water-sewage/solid waste companies played a significant role in the company’s ability to serve the local community. It thus behooves us to compare and connect the different components in the public housing company business model to complete the analysis of success in the value chain. Two-levels describe the situation. At the first level, the municipal public housing (MPH) organization is seen as functioning as a tenant-oriented, quasi-municipal utility within a value network composed of the municipality + the energy utility + the water-sewage/solid waste company. At the second level, a Shaffer analysis shows general harmony among the operations of each organization.  In particular, the MPH provides value-for-money rentals within the municipality and helps tenants turn their flats into homes. Additionally, continued appreciation of its base assets and apparent economies of scale were instrumental in the success of the operations at the tactical level. Insofar as the Swedish public housing model is undergoing a shift to be more “business-like”, this study indicates how the model successfully works at the individual company level. Because there are certain commonalities with other organizations in public management, observations may be relevant in their successful operations.

Keywords
Swedish Housing, Municipal Public Housing, Business Models, Case Study
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138665 (URN)
Conference
NFF 2017: The 24th Nordic Academy of Management Conference, Bodø, Norway, August 23-25, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M., Linderoth, H. & Rowlinson, S. (2017). The role of industry: an analytical framework to understand ICT transformation within the AEC industry. Construction Management and Economics, 35(10), 611-626
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of industry: an analytical framework to understand ICT transformation within the AEC industry
2017 (English)In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 611-626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite wide-ranging research on information and communication technologies (ICT) in the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry, little is known about the role that industry plays in the adoption and use of ICT. Based on observations of how the drivers for ICT use seem to be inconsistent with the industry’s central characteristics, and drawing on information systems (IS) research that demonstrates the role of shared systems of meaning, the purpose here is to develop an analytical framework that explains how industry shapes the adoption and use of ICT. Building on a theoretically driven approach and a case study, a framework is rst sketched and then substantiated through empirical illustrations. Three dimensions of industry are highlighted: the socio-cognitive environment, the market and production environment and institutional actors. It is explained how the interplay of these dimensions shapes the way the industry functions, which in turn in uence the adoption and use of ICT. The outcomes of the interplay can either be aligned or misaligned with ICT, which explains why certain aligned applications are rapidly adopted, whereas other applications are not. The primary implication is that the framework can aid in analysing the need for structural adaptation when trying to achieve ICT-induced change. 

Keywords
Industry analysis, AEC industry, ICT, Transformation, Analytical framework
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies; Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133978 (URN)10.1080/01446193.2017.1315148 (DOI)000413957500002 ()
Available from: 2017-04-24 Created: 2017-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindbergh, L., Jacobsson, M. & Wilson, T. (2016). A fourth look at public housing in Sweden: The business model. In: Jui-Chi Huang (Ed.), Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference: . Paper presented at Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference, Pennsylvania, June 2-4, 2016 (pp. 136-147). Pennsylvania Economic Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A fourth look at public housing in Sweden: The business model
2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference / [ed] Jui-Chi Huang, Pennsylvania Economic Association , 2016, p. 136-147Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Comparative housing analyses often find that the Swedish public housing model represents a success story. That is, a good class of housing is offered at a reasonable cost to all sections of the population – irre­spective of income, ethnicity, age or type of household. This approach has been called the “Swedish public housing model” and the purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect upon its operation. The company utilized in this study as a research case, AB Bostaden, builds and manages housing in the Umeå municipality. With 15,400 apartments, it is the biggest actor in the Umeå housing rental market, with a market share of approximately 45 percent, and controls 27 percent of the Umeå housing market overall.  The background section of the paper provides consideration of both the Swedish system of rental housing as well as aspects of business models. A typological-taxonomic approach to understanding business models is used to deconstruct Bostaden’s approach to its housing market. The business model that results through this approach indicates that the organization functions as a tenant-oriented, municipal utility with core values of human equality, transparency, care and a businesslike approach that captures a high return on rental revenue (~ 19.3% PBT) and a modest return on assets (7.9% ROA, including depreciation) within a value network of the kommun + the energy utility + the university by providing value-for-money rentals within the municipality and by helping tenants to turn their flats into homes and neighborhoods. Continued appreciation of its base assets and apparent economies of scale were instrumental in the success of the operations at the tactical level. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pennsylvania Economic Association, 2016
Keywords
Business models, municipal public housing, Sweden
National Category
Social Sciences Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-121728 (URN)
Conference
Pennsylvania Economic Association Conference, Pennsylvania, June 2-4, 2016
Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Jacobsson, M. & Hällgren, M. (2016). Impromptu teams in a temporary organization: on their nature and role. International Journal of Project Management, 34(4), 584-596
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impromptu teams in a temporary organization: on their nature and role
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 584-596Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The abundance and importance of temporary project teams in society introduces the need of understanding their nature. The purpose of this article thus is to highlight the existence of an only accidentally investigated type of team that we identify as Impromptu teams, and analyze their role in a temporary organization. Based on a detailed retrospective account of the infamous disaster on Mount Everest in 1996, we identify three examples of Impromptu teams. The three examples indicate that the teams are characterized by being triggered by an unexpected event, and formed through a bottom-up process, where joining the team is voluntary and the activities are based on a logic of appropriateness, rather than rule following. The identification and nature of Impromptu teams have implications far beyond Mount Everest, since most organizations at some point need to use teams similar to the identified examples.

Keywords
Team, Action teams, Impromptu team, Everest, Team formation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117796 (URN)10.1016/j.ijproman.2016.02.001 (DOI)000374708000003 ()
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2495-9676

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