umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Wennberg, Maria
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Johansson, M., Johansson, L., Wennberg, M. & Lind, M. (2019). Alcohol Consumption and Risk of First-Time Venous Thromboembolism in Men and Women. Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 119(6), 962-970
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol Consumption and Risk of First-Time Venous Thromboembolism in Men and Women
2019 (English)In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 119, no 6, p. 962-970Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The relationship between alcohol intake and risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unclear. Men and women differ in their drinking habits, which may affect a possible association.

OBJECTIVE: This article investigates the association between alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence and VTE in the total population as well as in men and women separately.

METHODS: We performed a prospective, population-based cohort study in northern Sweden. Study participants were 108,025 (51% women) persons aged 30 to 60 years who underwent a health examination between 1985 and 2014. We assessed alcohol consumption and defined alcohol dependence using a questionnaire. The outcome was a validated first-time VTE.

RESULTS: The mean follow-up time was 13.9 years, and 2,054 participants had a first-time VTE. The mean alcohol consumption was 3.5 standard drinks weekly in men and 1.5 in women. Alcohol dependence was found in 10% of men and 3% of women. There was an association between alcohol consumption (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.03 per standard drink weekly) as well as alcohol dependence (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.06-1.52) and VTE after adjustments. In men, the risk of VTE increased over quartiles of weekly alcohol consumption (p for trend 0.02), with a HR of 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.47) for the highest quartile. Alcohol dependence was associated with VTE in men (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07-1.59). In women, there were no significant associations.

CONCLUSION: High alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence were associated with increased risk of first-time VTE in men, but not in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Georg Thieme Verlag KG, 2019
Keywords
venous thromboembolism, venous thrombosis, alcohol consumption, alcohol intake, alcohol drinking, alcohol dependence, risk marker, prospective studies, cohort studies
National Category
Other Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157495 (URN)10.1055/s-0039-1681100 (DOI)000474924300013 ()30900224 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066132287 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Venous thromboEmbolism In Northern Sweden
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-03-24 Created: 2019-03-24 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Donat-Vargas, C., Bergdahl, I. A., Tornevi, A., Wennberg, M., Sommar, J., Koponen, J., . . . Åkesson, A. (2019). Associations between repeated measure of plasma perfluoroalkyl substances and cardiometabolic risk factors. Environment International, 124, 58-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between repeated measure of plasma perfluoroalkyl substances and cardiometabolic risk factors
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 124, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are persistent synthetic chemicals that may affect components of metabolic risk through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor but epidemiological data remain scarce and inconsistent.

Objective: To estimate associations between repeated measurements of the main PFAS in plasma and total cholesterol, triglycerides and hypertension among the control subjects from a population-based nested case-control study on diabetes type 2 in middle-aged women and men.

Methods: Participants (n = 187) were free of diabetes at both baseline and follow-up visits to the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, 10 years apart: during 1990 to 2003 (baseline) and 2001 to 2013 (follow-up). Participants left blood samples, completed questionnaires on diet and lifestyle factors, and underwent medical examinations, including measurement of blood pressure. PFAS and lipids were later determined in stored plasma samples. Associations for the repeated measurements were assessed using generalized estimating equations.

Results: Six PFAS exceeded the limit of quantitation. Repeated measures of PFAS in plasma, cardiometabolic risk factors and confounders, showed an average decrease of triglycerides from −0.16 mmol/l (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.33, 0.02 for PFOA) to −0.26 mmol/l (95% CI: −0.50, −0.08 for PFOS), when comparing the highest tertile of PFAS plasma levels with the lowest. Associations based on average PFAS measurements and follow-up triglycerides revealed similar inverse associations, although attenuated. The estimates for cholesterol and hypertension were inconsistent and with few exception non-significant.

Conclusions: This study found inverse associations between PFAS and triglycerides, but did not support any clear link with either cholesterol or hypertension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cardiometabolic risk factors, Environmental epidemiology, Hypertension, Lipids, Plasma perfluoroalkyl substances, Prospective assessment, Repeated measurements
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156228 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.01.007 (DOI)000457122700007 ()30639908 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059696116 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Västerbotten County CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2017-00822
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Marklund, M., Wu, J. H., Imamura, F., Del Gobbo, L. C., Fretts, A., de Goede, J., . . . Risérus, U. (2019). Biomarkers of Dietary Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: An Individual-Level Pooled Analysis of 30 Cohort Studies. Circulation, 139(21), 2422-2436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomarkers of Dietary Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: An Individual-Level Pooled Analysis of 30 Cohort Studies
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 21, p. 2422-2436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Global dietary recommendations for and cardiovascular effects of linoleic acid, the major dietary omega-6 fatty acid, and its major metabolite, arachidonic acid, remain controversial. To address this uncertainty and inform international recommendations, we evaluated how in vivo circulating and tissue levels of linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) relate to incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) across multiple international studies.

METHODS: We performed harmonized, de novo, individual-level analyses in a global consortium of 30 prospective observational studies from 13 countries. Multivariable-adjusted associations of circulating and adipose tissue LA and AA biomarkers with incident total CVD and subtypes (coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic stroke, cardiovascular mortality) were investigated according to a prespecified analytical plan. Levels of LA and AA, measured as % of total fatty acids, were evaluated linearly according to their interquintile range (i.e., the range between the mid-point of the first and fifth quintiles), and categorically by quintiles. Study-specific results were pooled using inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was explored by age, sex, race, diabetes, statin use, aspirin use, omega-3 levels, and fatty acid desaturase 1 genotype (when available).

RESULTS: In 30 prospective studies with medians of follow-up ranging 2.5 to 31.9 years, 15,198 incident cardiovascular events occurred among 68,659 participants. Higher levels of LA were significantly associated with lower risks of total CVD, cardiovascular mortality, and ischemic stroke, with hazard ratios per interquintile range of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88-0.99), 0.78 (0.70-0.85), and 0.88 (0.79-0.98), respectively, and nonsignificantly with lower CHD risk (0.94; 0.88-1.00). Relationships were similar for LA evaluated across quintiles. AA levels were not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular outcomes; comparing extreme quintiles, higher levels were associated with lower risk of total CVD (0.92; 0.86-0.99). No consistent heterogeneity by population subgroups was identified in the observed relationships.

CONCLUSIONS: In pooled global analyses, higher in vivo circulating and tissue levels of LA and possibly AA were associated with lower risk of major cardiovascular events. These results support a favorable role for LA in CVD prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Heart Association, 2019
Keywords
Arachidonic acid, Linoleic acid, Pooled analysis, diet and nutrition
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158789 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038908 (DOI)000469018300011 ()30971107 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Tornevi, A., Sommar, J., Rantakokko, P., Åkesson, A., Donat-Vargas, C., Kiviranta, H., . . . Bergdahl, I. A. (2019). Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants and type 2 diabetes - A population-based study with pre- and post- diagnostic plasma samples. Environmental Research, 174, 35-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlorinated persistent organic pollutants and type 2 diabetes - A population-based study with pre- and post- diagnostic plasma samples
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 174, p. 35-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but causality is uncertain.

OBJECTIVE: Within longitudinal population-based data from northern Sweden, we assessed how POPs associated with T2D prospectively and cross-sectionally, and further investigated factors related to individual changes in POP concentrations.

METHODS: For 129 case-controls pairs matched by age, sex and date of sampling, plasma concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), dioxin-like (DL) polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCB-118 and PCB-156), and non-dioxin like (NDL-PCB: PCB-74, -99, -138 -153, -170, -180, -183 and PCB-187) were analyzed twice (baseline and follow-up, 9-20 years apart). The cases received their T2D diagnose between baseline and follow-up. Prospective (using baseline data) and cross-sectional (using follow-up data) odds ratios (ORs) for T2D on lipid standardized POPs (HCB, p,p'-DDE, ∑DL-PCBs, ∑NDL-PCBs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and plasma lipids. The influence of BMI, weight-change, and plasma lipids on longitudinal changes in POP concentrations were evaluated among non-diabetic individuals (n = 306).

RESULTS: POPs were associated with T2D in both the prospective and cross-sectional assessments. Of a standard deviation increase in POPs, prospective ORs ranged 1.42 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.06) for ∑NDL-PCBs to 1.55 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.38) for HCB (p < 0.05 only for HCB), and cross-sectional ORs ranged 1.62 (95% CI: 1.13; 2.32) for p,p'-DDE to 2.06 (95% CI: 1.29, 3.28) for ∑DL-PCBs (p < 0.05 for all POPs). In analyses of non-diabetic individuals, higher baseline BMI, decreased weight and decreased plasma lipid concentrations were associated with a slower decrease of POPs. Cases had, besides a higher BMI, reduced cholesterol and weight gain at follow-up compared to controls, which can explain the higher ORs in the cross-sectional assessments.

DISCUSSION: The association between POPs and T2D was confirmed, but an indication that individuals body fat history might influence POP-T2D associations weakens the epidemiological support for a causal association. It also warrants studies based on other exposure metrics than biomonitoring. In addition, we note that a cross-sectional design overestimates the ORs if T2D cases have successfully intervened on weight and/or blood lipids, as changes in these factors cause changes in POPs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Biomonitoring, Longitudinal data, POPs, Polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, Type 2 diabetes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158688 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2019.04.017 (DOI)000470801100005 ()31029940 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Swedish Research Council, VR 2017-00650
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Aglago, E. K., Huybrechts, I., Murphy, N., Casagrande, C., Nicolas, G., Pischon, T., . . . Gunter, M. J. (2019). Consumption of Fish and Long-chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large European Cohort. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Fish and Long-chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large European Cohort
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is an unclear association between intake of fish and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs) and colorectal cancer (CRC). We examined the association between fish consumption, dietary and circulating levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs, and ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA with CRC using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

METHODS: Dietary intake of fish (total, fatty/oily, lean/white) and n-3 LC-PUFA were estimated by food frequency questionnaires given to 521,324 participants in the EPIC study; among these, 6291 individuals developed CRC (median follow up, 14.9 years). Levels of phospholipid LC-PUFA were measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples from a sub-group of 461 CRC cases and 461 matched individuals without CRC (controls). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and odds ratios (ORs), respectively, with 95% CIs.

RESULTS: Total intake of fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; Ptrend = .005), fatty fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; Ptrend = .009), and lean fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.83-1.00; Ptrend = .016) were inversely associated with CRC incidence. Intake of total n-3 LC-PUFA (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95; Ptrend = .010) was also associated with reduced risk of CRC, whereas dietary ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA was associated with increased risk of CRC (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18-1.45; Ptrend < .001). Plasma levels of phospholipid n-3 LC-PUFA was not associated with overall CRC risk, but an inverse trend was observed for proximal compared with distal colon cancer (Pheterogeneity = .026).

CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of dietary patterns of participants in the EPIC study, we found regular consumption of fish, at recommended levels, to be associated with a lower risk of CRC, possibly through exposure to n-3 LC-PUFA. Levels of n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma were not associated with CRC risk, but there may be differences in risk at different regions of the colon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Epidemiologic, Omega 3, Seafood, Tumorigenesis
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162704 (URN)10.1016/j.cgh.2019.06.031 (DOI)31252190 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-10-10
Key, T. J., Appleby, P. N., Bradbury, K. E., Sweeting, M., Wood, A., Johansson, I., . . . Danesh, J. (2019). Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort. Circulation, 139(25), 2835-2845
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 25, p. 2835-2845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the etiology of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort.

METHODS: A prospective study of 409,885 men and women in nine European countries. Diet was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated using 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During 12.6 years mean follow up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died from IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates.

RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.33) for a 100 g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.25 [1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR 0.93 [0.89-0.98] per 100 g/d increment), cheese (HR 0.92 [0.86-0.98] per 30 g/d increment) and eggs (HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99] per 20 g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and non-significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish or milk. In analyses modelling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese or eggs was associated with approximately 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat, and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-HDL cholesterol, and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, eggs, fish, meat
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158691 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038813 (DOI)000471794100017 ()31006335 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 205212/Z/16/ZSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Donat-Vargas, C., Bergdahl, I., Tornevi, A., Wennberg, M., Sommar, J., Kiviranta, H., . . . Akesson, A. (2019). Perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of type II diabetes: A prospective nested case-control study. Environment International, 123, 390-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perfluoroalkyl substances and risk of type II diabetes: A prospective nested case-control study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 123, p. 390-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have drawn much attention due to bioaccumulation potential and their current omnipresence in human blood. We assessed whether plasma PFAS, suspected to induce endocrine-disrupting effects, were prospectively associated with clinical type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk.

Methods: We established a nested case-control study within the Swedish prospective population-based Västerbotten Intervention Programme cohort. Several PFAS were measured in plasma from a subset of 124 case-control pairs at baseline (during 1990–2003) and at 10-year follow-up. T2D cases were matched (1:1) according to gender, age and sample date with participants without T2D (controls).

Conditional logistic regressions were used to prospectively assess risk of T2D by baseline PFAS plasma concentrations. Associations between long-term PFAS plasma levels (mean of baseline and follow-up) and insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA2-B%) at follow-up were prospectively explored among 178 and 181 controls, respectively, by multivariable linear regressions.

Results: After adjusting for gender, age, sample year, diet and body mass index, the odds ratio of T2D for the sum of PFAS (Σ z-score PFAS) was 0.52 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.20, 1.36), comparing third with first tertile; and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.00) per one standard deviation increment of sum of log-transformed PFAS. Among the controls, the adjusted β of HOMA2-IR and HOMA-B% for the sum of PFAS were −0.26 (95% CI: −0.52, −0.01) and −9.61 (95% CI: −22.60, 3.39) respectively comparing third with first tertile.

Conclusions: This prospective nested case-control study yielded overall inverse associations between individual PFAS and risk of T2D, although mostly non-significant. Among participants without T2D, long-term PFAS exposure was prospectively associated with lower insulin resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Environmental contaminants, Plasma perfluoroalkyl substances, Environmental risk factors, Diabetes, Insulin resistance, Endocrine disruption, Environmental epidemiology, Nested case-control study, Prospective assessment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155947 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.026 (DOI)000455532500044 ()30622063 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0758Västerbotten County Council, 2017-00822Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Bodén, S., Myte, R., Wennberg, M., Harlid, S., Johansson, I., Shivappa, N., . . . Nilsson, L. M. (2019). The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores. PLoS ONE, 14(4), Article ID e0214551.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores
Show others...
2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158790 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0214551 (DOI)000464349000016 ()30978193 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Huseinovic, E., Winkvist, A., Freisling, H., Slimani, N., Boeing, H., Buckland, G., . . . Bertéus Forslund, H. (2019). Timing of eating across ten European countries: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study. Public Health Nutrition, 22(2), 324-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timing of eating across ten European countries: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 324-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To examine timing of eating across ten European countries.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study using standardized 24 h diet recalls collected during 1995-2000. Eleven predefined food consumption occasions were assessed during the recall interview. We present time of consumption of meals and snacks as well as the later:earlier energy intake ratio, with earlier and later intakes defined as 06.00-14.00 and 15.00-24.00 hours, respectively. Type III tests were used to examine associations of sociodemographic, lifestyle and health variables with timing of energy intake.

SETTING: Ten Western European countries.

SUBJECTS: In total, 22 985 women and 13 035 men aged 35-74 years (n 36 020).

RESULTS: A south-north gradient was observed for timing of eating, with later consumption of meals and snacks in Mediterranean countries compared with Central and Northern European countries. However, the energy load was reversed, with the later:earlier energy intake ratio ranging from 0·68 (France) to 1·39 (Norway) among women, and from 0·71 (Greece) to 1·35 (the Netherlands) among men. Among women, country, age, education, marital status, smoking, day of recall and season were all independently associated with timing of energy intake (all P<0·05). Among men, the corresponding variables were country, age, education, smoking, physical activity, BMI and day of recall (all P<0·05).

CONCLUSIONS: We found pronounced differences in timing of eating across Europe, with later meal timetables but greater energy load earlier during the day in Mediterranean countries compared with Central and Northern European countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nutrition Society, 2019
Keywords
24 h diet recall, Chrono-nutrition, Diurnal eating, EPIC, Meal patterns, Meals, Snacks, Standardization
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156373 (URN)10.1017/S1368980018002288 (DOI)000458515400014 ()30326988 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Wennberg, M., Ruuth, A., Andersson, L. & Bergdahl, I. A. (2018). Mercury concentrations in pregnant women in circumpolar Sweden (Kiruna). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mercury concentrations in pregnant women in circumpolar Sweden (Kiruna)
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

High exposure to mercury have been found in populations living in circumpolar areas, due to high consumption of sea food and accumulation of mercury closer to the north pole. The developing fetus is especially sensitive to effects of mercury. Exposure to mercury has previously been examined in pregnant women in Sweden, but not in pregnant women residing in Sweden north of the polar circle.

In the years 2015-2016, mercury was measured in whole blood from 51 pregnant women living in the city of Kiruna in circumpolar Sweden, taking part in an international comparison between eight circumpolar countries. This report presents the Swedish results on mercury concentrations and associations with some exposure determinants. Also, compliance to dietary advice on fish consumption, appointed to fertile women, was examined.

The median concentration of total-Hg in whole blood was 0.40 μg/L (min, max; <0.40, 1.88) among the 51 pregnant women in Kiruna. This is similar or lower compared to concentrations of mercury in pregnant women in other parts of Sweden. None of the women in the study had concentrations of mercury that are considered as dangerous.

Mercury concentrations were associated with total fish consumption but not to consumption of predatory fish, known to be higher in mercury. All of the women in the study had knowledge about dietary advice on fish consumption. One woman exceeded the recommended consumption of predatory fish, limited due to risk of high mercury content, but this woman did not have high concentrations of mercury. While the vast majority of women thus followed the recommendations of not eating too much polluted fish, only 15 % of the women reported sufficient fish consumption to comply with the dietary advice (2-3 times/week).

In conclusion, pregnant women in circumpolar Sweden have low exposure to mercury, and do not deviant from pregnant women in other parts of Sweden. Knowledge about dietary advice on fish consumption appointed to fertile women is very good. The public health concern though, is that pregnant women in circumpolar Sweden do not eat enough fish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2018. p. 16
Series
Yrkes- och miljömedicin i umeå rapporterar, ISSN 1654-7314 ; 2018:3
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147733 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-08-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications