umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Oudin Åström, Daniel
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Carlsen, H. K., Oudin, A., Steingrimsson, S. & Oudin Åström, D. (2019). Ambient Temperature and Associations with Daily Visits to a Psychiatric Emergency Unit in Sweden. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(2), Article ID E286.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambient Temperature and Associations with Daily Visits to a Psychiatric Emergency Unit in Sweden
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 2, article id E286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High or low ambient temperatures pose a risk factor for the worsening or onset of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ambient temperature and psychiatric emergency visits in an urban region in a temperate climate. The daily number of visits to a psychiatric emergency room (PEVs) at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden and the daily mean temperature were extracted for the study period 1 July 2012 to 31 December 2017. Case-crossover analysis with distributed lag non-linear models was used to analyse the data by season. The warm season was defined as May to August and the cold season as November to February. Shorter lags periods were used for the warm season than the cold season. In the analysis, temperatures at the 95th percentile was associated with 14% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2%, 28%) increase in PEVs at lag 0⁻3 and 22% (95%CI: 6%, 40%) for lags 0⁻14 during the warm season, relative to the seasonal minimum effect temperature (MET). During the cold season temperatures at the 5th percentile were associated with 25% (95% CI: -8%, 13%) and 18% (95% CI: -30%, 98%) increase in PEVs at lags 0⁻14 and 0⁻21 respectively. We observed an increased number of PEVs at high and low temperatures; however, not to a statistically significant extent for low temperatures. Our findings are similar to what has been found for somatic diseases and in studies of other mental health outcomes in regions with more extreme climates. This merits the inclusion of individuals with psychiatric disorders in awareness planning for climate warning systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
climate, environmental epidemiology, mental illness, psychiatric disorders
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155863 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16020286 (DOI)000459112100121 ()30669579 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Oudin Åström, D., Veber, T., Martinsone, Ž., Kaļužnaja, D., Indermitte, E., Oudin, A. & Orru, H. (2019). Mortality Related to Cold Temperatures in Two Capitals of the Baltics: Tallinn and Riga. Medicina (Kaunas), 55(8), Article ID 429.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality Related to Cold Temperatures in Two Capitals of the Baltics: Tallinn and Riga
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Medicina (Kaunas), ISSN 1010-660X, E-ISSN 1648-9144, Vol. 55, no 8, article id 429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objectives: Despite global warming, the climate in Northern Europe is generally cold, and the large number of deaths due to non-optimal temperatures is likely due to cold temperatures. The aim of the current study is to investigate the association between cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, as well as cause-specific mortality, in Tallinn and Riga in North-Eastern Europe.

Materials and Methods: We used daily information on deaths from state death registries and minimum temperatures from November to March over the period 1997-2015 in Tallinn and 2009-2015 in Riga. The relationship between the daily minimum temperature and mortality was investigated using the Poisson regression, combined with a distributed lag non-linear model considering lag times of up to 21 days.

Results: We found significantly higher all-cause mortality owing to cold temperatures both in Tallinn (Relative Risk (RR) = 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01-1.62) and in Riga (RR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.11-1.79). In addition, significantly increased mortality due to cold temperatures was observed in the 75+ age group (RR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.17-2.31) and in cardiovascular mortality (RR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.31-2.55) in Tallinn and in the under 75 age group in Riga (RR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.12-2.22). In this study, we found no statistically significant relationship between mortality due to respiratory or external causes and cold days. The cold-related attributable fraction (AF) was 7.4% (95% CI -3.7-17.5) in Tallinn and 8.3% (95% CI -0.5-16.3) in Riga. This indicates that a relatively large proportion of deaths in cold periods can be related to cold in North-Eastern Europe, where winters are relatively harsh.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Baltics, all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality, cold-related attributable fraction, distributed lag non-linear models, temperature-related mortality, winter mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162421 (URN)10.3390/medicina55080429 (DOI)31382432 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Armstrong, B., Sera, F., Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M., Abrutzky, R., Oudin Åström, D., Bell, M. L., . . . Gasparrini, A. (2019). The Role of Humidity in Associations of High Temperature with Mortality: A Multicountry, Multicity Study. Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, 127(9), Article ID 097007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Humidity in Associations of High Temperature with Mortality: A Multicountry, Multicity Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 127, no 9, article id 097007Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is strong experimental evidence that physiologic stress from high temperatures is greater if humidity is higher. However, heat indices developed to allow for this have not consistently predicted mortality better than dry-bulb temperature.

Objectives: We aimed to clarify the potential contribution of humidity an addition to temperature in predicting daily mortality in summer by using a large multicountry dataset.

Methods: In 445 cities in 24 countries, we fit a time-series regression model for summer mortality with a distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) for temperature (up to lag 3) and supplemented this with a range of terms for relative humidity (RH) and its interaction with temperature. City-specific associations were summarized using meta-analytic techniques.

Results: Adding a linear term for RH to the temperature term improved fit slightly, with an increase of 23% in RH (the 99th percentile anomaly) associated with a 1.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.3] decrease in mortality. Allowing curvature in the RH term or adding terms for interaction of RH with temperature did not improve the model fit. The humidity-related decreased risk was made up of a positive coefficient at lag 0 outweighed by negative coefficients at lags of 1–3 d. Key results were broadly robust to small model changes and replacing RH with absolute measures of humidity. Replacing temperature with apparent temperature, a metric combining humidity and temperature, reduced goodness of fit slightly.

Discussion:The absence of a positive association of humidity with mortality in summer in this large multinational study is counter to expectations from physiologic studies, though consistent with previous epidemiologic studies finding little evidence for improved prediction by heat indices. The result that there was a small negative average association of humidity with mortality should be interpreted cautiously; the lag structure has unclear interpretation and suggests the need for future work to clarify.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163718 (URN)10.1289/EHP5430 (DOI)31553655 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072666411 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Oudin, A., Andersson, J., Sundström, A., Nordin Adolfsson, A., Oudin Åström, D., Adolfsson, R., . . . Nordin, M. (2019). Traffic-Related Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Dementia: No Clear Modifying Effects of APOEɛ4 in the Betula Cohort. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traffic-Related Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Dementia: No Clear Modifying Effects of APOEɛ4 in the Betula Cohort
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

It is widely known that the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele imposes a higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that exposure to air pollution is also a risk factor for AD, and results from a few studies indicate that the effect of air pollution on cognitive function and dementia is stronger in APOE ɛ4 carriers than in non-carriers. Air pollution and interaction with APOE ɛ4 on AD risk thus merits further attention. We studied dementia incidence over a 15-year period from the longitudinal Betula study in Northern Sweden. As a marker for long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution, we used modelled annual mean nitrogen oxide levels at the residential address of the participants at start of follow-up. Nitrogen oxide correlate well with fine particulate air pollution levels in the study area. We had full data on air pollution, incidence of AD and vascular dementia (VaD), APOE ɛ4 carrier status, and relevant confounding factors for 1,567 participants. As expected, air pollution was rather clearly associated with dementia incidence. However, there was no evidence for a modifying effect by APOE ɛ4 on the association (p-value for interaction > 0.30 for both total dementia (AD+VaD) and AD). The results from this study do not imply that adverse effects of air pollution on dementia incidence is limited to, or stronger in, APOE ɛ4 carriers than in the total population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2019
Keywords
Air pollution, Alzheimer’s disease, apolipoprotein E, dementia
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163266 (URN)10.3233/JAD-181037 (DOI)31450491 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-09-13
Odhiambo Sewe, M., Bunker, A., Ingole, V., Egondi, T., Oudin Åström, D., Hondula, D. M., . . . Schumann, B. (2018). Estimated Effect of Temperature on Years of Life Lost: A Retrospective Time-Series Study of Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Regions. Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, 126(1), Article ID 017004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimated Effect of Temperature on Years of Life Lost: A Retrospective Time-Series Study of Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Regions
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 126, no 1, article id 017004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have reported a strong association between temperature and mortality. Additional insights can be gained from investigating the effects of temperature on years of life lost (YLL), considering the life expectancy at the time of death.

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this work was to assess the association between temperature and YLL at seven low-, middle-, and high-income sites.

METHODS: We obtained meteorological and population data for at least nine years from four Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites in Kenya (western Kenya, Nairobi), Burkina Faso (Nouna), and India (Vadu), as well as data from cities in the United States (Philadelphia, Phoenix) and Sweden (Stockholm). A distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the association of daily maximum temperature and daily YLL, lagged 0-14 d. The reference value was set for each site at the temperature with the lowest YLL.

RESULTS: Generally, YLL increased with higher temperature, starting day 0. In Nouna, the hottest location, with a minimum YLL temperature at the first percentile, YLL increased consistently with higher temperatures. In Vadu, YLL increased in association with heat, whereas in Nairobi, YLL increased in association with both low and high temperatures. Associations with cold and heat were evident for Phoenix (stronger for heat), Stockholm, and Philadelphia (both stronger for cold). Patterns of associations with mortality were generally similar to those with YLL.

CONCLUSIONS: Both high and low temperatures are associated with YLL in high-, middle-, and low-income countries. Policy guidance and health adaptation measures might be improved with more comprehensive indicators of the health burden of high and low temperatures such as YLL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Health Services, US Dept of Health and Human Services, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144197 (URN)10.1289/EHP1745 (DOI)000424212100010 ()29342452 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Oudin Åström, D., Åström, C., Forsberg, B., Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M., Gasparrini, A., Oudin, A. & Sundquist, K. (2018). Heat wave-related mortality in Sweden: a case-crossover study investigating effect modification by neighbourhood deprivation. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heat wave-related mortality in Sweden: a case-crossover study investigating effect modification by neighbourhood deprivation
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The present study aimed to investigate if set thresholds in the Swedish heat-wave warning system are valid for all parts of Sweden and if the heat-wave warning system captures a potential increase in all-cause mortality and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. An additional aim was to investigate whether neighbourhood deprivation modifies the relationship between heat waves and mortality.

METHODS: From 1990 until 2014, in 14 municipalities in Sweden, we collected data on daily maximum temperatures and mortality for the five warmest months. Heat waves were defined according to the categories used in the current Swedish heat-wave warning system. Using a case-crossover approach, we investigated the association between heat waves and mortality in Sweden, as well as a modifying effect of neighbourhood deprivation.

RESULTS: On a national as well as a regional level, heat waves significantly increased both all-cause mortality and CHD mortality by approximately 10% and 15%, respectively. While neighbourhood deprivation did not seem to modify heat wave-related all-cause mortality, CHD mortality did seem to modify the risk.

CONCLUSIONS: It may not be appropriate to assume that heat waves in Sweden will have the same impact in a northern setting as in a southern, or that the impact of heat waves will be the same in affluent and deprived neighbourhoods. When designing and implementing heat-wave warning systems, neighbourhood, regional and national information should be incorporated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Heat wave, heat-wave warning system, mortality, neighbourhood deprivation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152188 (URN)10.1177/1403494818801615 (DOI)30253698 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-04-04
Oudin Åström, D., Ebi, K. L., Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M. & Gasparrini, A. (2018). Investigating changes in mortality attributable to heat and cold in Stockholm, Sweden. International journal of biometeorology, 62(9), 1777-1780
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating changes in mortality attributable to heat and cold in Stockholm, Sweden
2018 (English)In: International journal of biometeorology, ISSN 0020-7128, E-ISSN 1432-1254, Vol. 62, no 9, p. 1777-1780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Projections of temperature-related mortality rely upon exposure-response relationships using recent data. Analyzing long historical data and trends may extend knowledge of past and present impacts that may provide additional insight and improve future scenarios. We collected daily mean temperatures and daily all-cause mortality for the period 1901-2013 for Stockholm County, Sweden, and calculated the total attributable fraction of mortality due to non-optimal temperatures and quantified the contribution of cold and heat. Total mortality attributable to non-optimal temperatures varied between periods and cold consistently had a larger impact on mortality than heat. Cold-related attributable fraction (AF) remained stable over time whereas heat-related AF decreased. AF on cold days remained stable over time, which may indicate that mortality during colder months may not decline as temperatures increase in the future. More research is needed to enhance estimates of burdens related to cold and heat in the future.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147657 (URN)10.1007/s00484-018-1556-9 (DOI)000442854500022 ()29748912 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046752731 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Guo, Y., Gasparrini, A., Li, S., Sera, F., Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M., de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio Coelho, M., . . . Tong, S. (2018). Quantifying excess deaths related to heatwaves under climate change scenarios: A multicountry time series modelling study. PLoS Medicine, 15(7), Article ID e1002629.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantifying excess deaths related to heatwaves under climate change scenarios: A multicountry time series modelling study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 15, no 7, article id e1002629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Heatwaves are a critical public health problem. There will be an increase in the frequency and severity of heatwaves under changing climate. However, evidence about the impacts of climate change on heatwave-related mortality at a global scale is limited.

METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected historical daily time series of mean temperature and mortality for all causes or nonexternal causes, in periods ranging from January 1, 1984, to December 31, 2015, in 412 communities within 20 countries/regions. We estimated heatwave-mortality associations through a two-stage time series design. Current and future daily mean temperature series were projected under four scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions from 1971-2099, with five general circulation models. We projected excess mortality in relation to heatwaves in the future under each scenario of greenhouse gas emissions, with two assumptions for adaptation (no adaptation and hypothetical adaptation) and three scenarios of population change (high variant, median variant, and low variant). Results show that, if there is no adaptation, heatwave-related excess mortality is expected to increase the most in tropical and subtropical countries/regions (close to the equator), while European countries and the United States will have smaller percent increases in heatwave-related excess mortality. The higher the population variant and the greenhouse gas emissions, the higher the increase of heatwave-related excess mortality in the future. The changes in 2031-2080 compared with 1971-2020 range from approximately 2,000% in Colombia to 150% in Moldova under the highest emission scenario and high-variant population scenario, without any adaptation. If we considered hypothetical adaptation to future climate, under high-variant population scenario and all scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions, the heatwave-related excess mortality is expected to still increase across all the countries/regions except Moldova and Japan. However, the increase would be much smaller than the no adaptation scenario. The simple assumptions with respect to adaptation as follows: no adaptation and hypothetical adaptation results in some uncertainties of projections.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a comprehensive characterisation of future heatwave-related excess mortality across various regions and under alternative scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions, different assumptions of adaptation, and different scenarios of population change. The projections can help decision makers in planning adaptation and mitigation strategies for climate change.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151102 (URN)10.1371/journal.pmed.1002629 (DOI)000440339700034 ()30063714 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051119247 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M., Guo, Y., Sera, F., Huber, V., Schleussner, C.-F. -., Mitchell, D., . . . Gasparrini, A. (2018). Temperature-related mortality impacts under and beyond Paris Agreement climate change scenarios [Letter to the editor]. Climatic Change, 150(3-4), 391-402
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temperature-related mortality impacts under and beyond Paris Agreement climate change scenarios
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 150, no 3-4, p. 391-402Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Paris Agreement binds all nations to undertake ambitious efforts to combat climate change, with the commitment to “hold warming well below 2 °C in global mean temperature (GMT), relative to pre-industrial levels, and to pursue efforts to limit warming to 1.5 °C”. The 1.5 °C limit constitutes an ambitious goal for which greater evidence on its benefits for health would help guide policy and potentially increase the motivation for action. Here we contribute to this gap with an assessment on the potential health benefits, in terms of reductions in temperature-related mortality, derived from the compliance to the agreed temperature targets, compared to more extreme warming scenarios. We performed a multi-region analysis in 451 locations in 23 countries with different climate zones, and evaluated changes in heat and cold-related mortality under scenarios consistent with the Paris Agreement targets (1.5 and 2 °C) and more extreme GMT increases (3 and 4 °C), and under the assumption of no changes in demographic distribution and vulnerability. Our results suggest that limiting warming below 2 °C could prevent large increases in temperature-related mortality in most regions worldwide. The comparison between 1.5 and 2 °C is more complex and characterized by higher uncertainty, with geographical differences that indicate potential benefits limited to areas located in warmer climates, where direct climate change impacts will be more discernible.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Climate change, Mortality, Temperature, Projections
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152338 (URN)10.1007/s10584-018-2274-3 (DOI)000448034000017 ()30405277 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053489637 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
Oudin, A., Åström, D. O., Asplund, P., Steingrimsson, S., Szabo, Z. & Carlsen, H. K. (2018). The association between daily concentrations of air pollution and visits to a psychiatric emergency unit: a case-crossover study. Environmental health, 17, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between daily concentrations of air pollution and visits to a psychiatric emergency unit: a case-crossover study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Environmental health, ISSN 1476-069X, E-ISSN 1476-069X, Vol. 17, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Air pollution is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Experimental studies, and a few epidemiological studies, suggest that air pollution may cause acute exacerbation of psychiatric disorders, and even increase the rate of suicide attempts, but epidemiological studies on air pollution in association with psychiatric disorders are still few. Our aim was to investigate associations between daily fluctuations in air pollution concentrations and the daily number of visits to a psychiatric emergency unit.

METHODS: Data from Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, on the daily number of visits to the Psychiatric emergency unit were combined with daily data on monitored concentrations of respirable particulate matter(PM10), ozone(O3), nitrogen dioxides(NO2) and temperature between 1st July 2012 and 31st December 2016. We used a case-crossover design to analyze data with conditional Poisson regression models allowing for over-dispersion. We stratified data on season.

RESULTS: Visits increased with increasing PM10 levels during the warmer season (April to September) in both single-pollutant and two-pollutant models. For example, an increase of 3.6% (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.4-7.0%) was observed with a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10 adjusted for NO2. In the three-pollutant models (adjusting for NO2 and O3 simultaneously) the increase was 3.3% (95% CI, -0.2-6.9). There were no clear associations between the outcome and NO2, O3, or PM10 during the colder season (October to March).

CONCLUSIONS: Ambient air particle concentrations were associated with the number of visits to the Psychiatric emergency unit in the warm season. The results were only borderline statistically significant in the fully adjusted (three-pollutant) models in this small study. The observation could be interpreted as indicative of air pollution as either exacerbating an underlying psychiatric disorder, or increasing mental distress, even in areas with comparatively low levels of air pollution. In combination with the severe impact of psychiatric disorders and mental distress on society and individuals, our results are a strong warrant for future research in this area.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
acute effects of air pollution, air pollution, environmental epidemiology, mental distress, particles, psychiatric disorders
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144248 (URN)10.1186/s12940-017-0348-8 (DOI)000419965500001 ()29321054 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications