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Stål, Herman, Associate professorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0186-0358
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Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Corvellec, H. & Stål, H. (2019). Qualification as corporate activism: How Swedish apparel retailers attachcircular fashion qualities to take-back systems. Scandinavian Journal of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualification as corporate activism: How Swedish apparel retailers attachcircular fashion qualities to take-back systems
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper explains how corporations can develop market-based activities to influence environmental policies. The empirical focus is on how Swedish apparel retailers qualify take-back systems for used clothes and textiles assteps toward creating circular fashion. An analysis of the qualities that retailers attach to take-back systemsshows how qualification helps corporations feature fashion as potentially sustainable and able to develop circularmaterial flows, with the aim to enroll staff, customers, and other stakeholders in new behaviors andpatterns of responsibility. We apply the notion of corporate activism to demonstrate how corporations usequalification to engage in market-based activities with the aim of influencing the regulatory agenda.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Corporate political activism; corporate activism;qualification;take-back systems;apparel
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157805 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2019.03.002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85063584564 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20160063Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2013-120
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-05-29
Stål, H. (2019). The affordances of innovations – Towards an institutional understanding of material properties. In: : . Paper presented at 35th European Group of Organization Studies (EGOs) Colloquium, Edinburgh.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The affordances of innovations – Towards an institutional understanding of material properties
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The role of materiality in organization theory has been somewhat neglected (Dale, 2005; Jarzabkowski et al., 2013), which seems problematic when one seeks to understand how innovations impact on prevailing practice. New material properties, that enable new actions, seem to be just what innovations bring to prevailing practice. Our purpose in this paper is to, develop an understanding of materiality that allows material properties to influence the interpretations that are made albeit in duality with the constitutive forces of the institutional context. We illustrate our conceptual framework via a case study of how a new global health-care innovation, the Non-Invasive Parental Test (NIPT), has impacted on an institutionalized health-care practice, namely Prenatal Testing (PNT), in Sweden. Further, while affordances stem from relations to practice, we show that how these affordances come to affect institutionalization, the actions taken within the field to adopt or challenge an innovation, not so much because of the institutional meaning that underpins that practice but rather how that meaning is employed.

Keywords
affordance; innovation; institutional theory; translation; prenatal diagnosis; non-invasive test (NIPT)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Ethics; Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157806 (URN)
Conference
35th European Group of Organization Studies (EGOs) Colloquium, Edinburgh
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-04
Stål, H. & Hervé, C. (2018). A decoupling perspective on circular business model implementation: illustrations from Swedish apparel. Journal of Cleaner Production, 171, 630-643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A decoupling perspective on circular business model implementation: illustrations from Swedish apparel
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 171, p. 630-643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing on the concept of decoupling, from institutional theory in organizational studies, this paperexplains how organizations mitigate demands for circularity. Seven Swedish apparel companies thathave started collecting used clothes as a form of engagement with circular business models serve as casestudies. The paper shows how outsourcing and internal separation allow these companies to buffer theirbusiness model and core way of creating value from emerging demands. It also shows how companiespro-actively work at influencing institutional demands for circularity by making these demandscompatible with their own interests. The concept of decoupling thereby provides key insights into thedevelopment and implementation, or absence thereof, of circular business models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
circular business models, circular economy, decoupling, sustainable business models, institutional theory, product-service-systems
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141598 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.09.249 (DOI)000418978100057 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2013-120
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stål, H. (2018). Business models based on strongly sustainable entrepreneurship: insights from a systemic literature review (1sted.). In: Karl Johan Bonnedahl; Pasi Heikkurinen (Ed.), Strongly sustainable societies: organizing human activities on a hot and full Earth (pp. 153-171). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business models based on strongly sustainable entrepreneurship: insights from a systemic literature review
2018 (English)In: Strongly sustainable societies: organizing human activities on a hot and full Earth / [ed] Karl Johan Bonnedahl; Pasi Heikkurinen, Routledge, 2018, 1st, p. 153-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Strongly sustainable entrepreneurship refers to an entrepreneurship based upon ecological economics that attempts to conceptualise value without reducing value solely to market demand. On a hot and full earth strongly sustainable entrepreneurship is needed to maintain economic activities within biophysical limits. This paper asks what business models that could be based on such entrepreneurship and how they could be developed and designed. Through a systematic review of the literature on sustainable business models insights are gathered and discussed. It is concluded that the business models of strongly sustainable entrepreneurs need to include feedback from natural scientists and to be developed in a collective process, but also may demand new legal forms. Moreover, value should be conceived as both created and captured in a network, where stakeholders protect the interests of each other and thereby enable ventures to survive and activities to continue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1st
Series
Routledge studies in sustainability
Keywords
strong sustainability, business model, sustainable entrepreneurship, ecological economics, stakeholder
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainability; sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148506 (URN)9780815387220 (ISBN)9780815387213 (ISBN)9781351173643 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-06 Created: 2018-06-06 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Manzhynski, S., Bengtsson, M. & Stål, H. (2018). Knotted paradoxes in eco-innovation: a double trap or two needs with one deed?. In: : . Paper presented at 34th EGOS Colloquium, Tallinn, July 5-7, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knotted paradoxes in eco-innovation: a double trap or two needs with one deed?
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Paradox theory has not yet considered how paradoxes interact when they are brought together. To explore such knotting we investigate coopetition for sustainability, when competitors collaborate to address environmental concerns. We use a case study of three examples of collaborative activities between housing companies in Belarus to display how these two paradoxes are knotted together. We find that coopetition brings less tension and is used as a means to address stronger sustainability tensions, enabling firms to partially achieve ‘two needs with one deed’. Based on our findings we suggest that how knotting appears is affected by the type of paradoxes involved, the strength and dynamics of their tensions, and their relationships to each other. We conclude with a call for more research particularly in more competitive settings and with other types of paradoxes. 

Keywords
Paradox, tensions, sustainability, coopetition, coopetition for sustainability, knotted paradoxes
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152504 (URN)
Conference
34th EGOS Colloquium, Tallinn, July 5-7, 2018
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-10-08
Babri, M., Corvellec, H. & Stål, H. (2018). Power in the development of Circular Business Models: An Actor Network Theory approach. In: : . Paper presented at Corporate Responsibility Research Conference 2018, 10–12 September, 2018, Devonshire Hall, Leeds, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Power in the development of Circular Business Models: An Actor Network Theory approach
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Circular business model, Circular Economy, Power, Actor-Network Theory, Material agency
National Category
Business Administration Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151918 (URN)
Conference
Corporate Responsibility Research Conference 2018, 10–12 September, 2018, Devonshire Hall, Leeds, UK
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Hervé, C. & Stål, H. (2017). Evidencing the waste effect of Product-Service Systems (PSSs). Journal of Cleaner Production, 145, 14-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidencing the waste effect of Product-Service Systems (PSSs)
2017 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 145, p. 14-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper adopts a waste-centric analysis of Product-Service Systems (PSSs) to demonstrate that they do not automatically contribute to a dematerialization of the economy, a decoupling of production from material and energy consumption, and thus a transition toward sustainability. A qualitative analysis of various Nordic fashion PSSs that uses a combination of Tukker’s (2004) classification of PSSs and the European waste hierarchy model demonstrates that the waste effect of a PSS is independent of its being product-oriented, use-oriented, or result-oriented. Rather, the effect depends on how the business model of the PSS organizes material flows at production, distribution, use, and post-consumption stages in relationship to prevailing waste regimes where the PSS operates.We suggest that if a PSS is to reduce its waste effect and contribute to dematerialization, its business model should design material flows that fit with the prevailing waste regimes within the area it operates and prioritize waste prevention before considering reuse, recycling, energy recovery, and landfilling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Product-Service System (PSS), Fashion, Waste, Dematerialization, Sustainability, European waste hierarchy
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130410 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.033 (DOI)000394062300002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2013-120
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stål, H. (2017). Institutional maintenance within the regulative pillar. In: Academy of Management Proceedings: . Paper presented at Academy of Management (AOM) Meeting, 2017 (pp. 15180). Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510: Academy of Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutional maintenance within the regulative pillar
2017 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510: Academy of Management , 2017, p. 15180-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There is a gap in the institutional work-literature regarding the role of the so-called regulative pillar when it comes to institutional maintenance. Understanding processes and outcomes related to this pillar are important, as they often have decisive impacts on the institutional dynamics within fields. To fill this gap, this paper draws on a case study of Swedish agri-food policy addressing climate change. By focusing on problematizations as triggers, the paper shows that policies supporting controversial practices are maintained as a redefined script that restores cognitive order is created. These case findings are then used to suggest several proposition regarding the characteristics of maintenance within the regulative pillar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510: Academy of Management, 2017
Keywords
institutional work, institutional maintenance, regulative pillar, problematization, climate change
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157807 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2017.15180abstract (DOI)
Conference
Academy of Management (AOM) Meeting, 2017
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Corvellec, H. & Stål, H. (2017). Qualifying infrastructures: Take-back systems in clothing retail. In: The good organization: Aspirations - Interventions - Struggles. Paper presented at 33rd EGOS Colloquium, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualifying infrastructures: Take-back systems in clothing retail
2017 (English)In: The good organization: Aspirations - Interventions - Struggles, 2017Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we apply to infrastructure development the notion of qualification that Callon et al. (2002) introduced to explain the dynamics of markets for products and services. Based on how Swedish clothing retailers qualify take-back systems for used clothes and textiles, we shows that qualification rests on a combination of action nets, storytelling, and agency of things. We shows also that qualification does not simply draw on existing referents; it can be a definitional effort that performs the reality that it refers to. Finally, drawing on how Swedish clothing retailers use their qualification of take-back systems to provide a concrete definition of circular fashion, we claim that infrastructure qualification is a way for corporation to behave as political actors.

Keywords
qualification, economy of qualities, infrastructure, take-back systems, clothing retail
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainability
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157842 (URN)
Conference
33rd EGOS Colloquium, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 6-8, 2017
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Stål, H. I. & Jansson, J. (2017). Sustainable consumption and value propositions: exploring product–service system practices among Swedish fashion firms. Sustainable Development, 25(6), 546-558
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable consumption and value propositions: exploring product–service system practices among Swedish fashion firms
2017 (English)In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 546-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since sustainable consumption (SC) research focuses primarily on consumer purchasing behaviors, there is a gap regarding how firms attempt to shape sustainable consumption in practice. Utilizing nine case studies, this gap is addressed by exploring the use of value propositions entailing product–service systems among Swedish fashion firms. The value propositions in use by the firms suggest that sustainable consumption may be extending beyond purchase to also include aspects of use and disposal, suggesting new reciprocal responsibilities for firms and consumers. Similarities are found in what elements firms incorporate in their value propositions (i.e. more sustainable textiles, repair and take-back systems), but differences in how these are elaborated, testifying to the inter-organizational dynamics that embed practices. The paper ends with the specific caution that take-back systems may send illusionary signals regarding recycling that legitimize increased consumption and further accelerate material throughput, which would be at odds with notions of strong sustainable consumption.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
sustainable consumption, product–service systems (PSSs), value proposition, practice definition, sustainable fashion, waste, sustainable business models, circular economy
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
sustainable development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130605 (URN)10.1002/sd.1677 (DOI)000418099600007 ()
Projects
RiseB
Note

USBESDA

Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0186-0358

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