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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Jonsson, M., Andersson, M., Fick, J., Brodin, T., Klaminder, J. & Piovano, S. (2019). High-speed imaging reveals how antihistamine exposure affects escape behaviours in aquatic insect prey. Science of the Total Environment, 648, 1257-1262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-speed imaging reveals how antihistamine exposure affects escape behaviours in aquatic insect prey
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 648, p. 1257-1262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquatic systems receive a wide range of pharmaceuticals that may have adverse impacts on aquatic wildlife. Among these pharmaceuticals, antihistamines are commonly found, and these substances have the potential to influence the physiology of aquatic invertebrates. Previous studies have focused on how antihistamines may affect behaviours of aquatic invertebrates, but these studies probably do not capture the full consequences of antihistamine exposure, as traditional recording techniques do not capture important animal movements occurring at the scale of milliseconds, such as prey escape responses. In this study, we investigated if antihistamine exposure can impact escape responses in aquatic insect, by exposing damselfly (Coenagrion hastulatum) larvae to two environmentally relevant concentrations (0.1 and 1 μg L−1) of diphenhydramine. Importantly, we used a high-speed imaging approach that with high-time resolution captures details of escape responses and, thus, potential impacts of diphenhydramine on these behaviours. Our results show overall weak effects of antihistamine exposure on the escape behaviours of damselfly larvae. However, at stage 2 of the C-escape response, we found a significant increase in turning angle, which corresponds to a reduced swimming velocity, indicating a reduced success at evading a predator attack. Thus, we show that low concentrations of an antihistamine may affect behaviours strongly related to fitness of aquatic insect prey – effects would have been overlooked using traditional recording techniques. Hence, to understand the full consequences of pharmaceutical contamination on aquatic wildlife, high-speed imaging should be incorporated into future environmental risk assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Damselfly larvae, Diphenhydramine, Escape response, Pharmaceutical pollution
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150912 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.08.226 (DOI)2-s2.0-85052146409 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Klaminder, J., Jonsson, M., Leander, J., Fahlman, J., Brodin, T., Fick, J. & Hellström, G. (2019). Less anxious salmon smolt become easy prey during downstream migration. Science of the Total Environment, 687, 488-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Less anxious salmon smolt become easy prey during downstream migration
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 687, p. 488-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hatchery-reared salmon smolt used for supplementary stocking often display poor migration behavior compared to wild smolt, which reduces the success of this management action. Oxazepam, an anxiolytic drug, has been shown to intensify salmon smolt migration in mesocosm experiments, and treatment with this drug has, therefore, been suggested as a management option to improve downstream smolt migration. In this study, we tested this by assessing migration performance of hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolt along a 21-km long natural river-to-sea migration route in a boreal river in Northern Sweden. Using acoustic telemetry, the migration rate and survival of smolt that had been exposed to oxazepam (200 mu g L-1, N = 20) was monitored and compared with a control group (N = 20) of unexposed smolt. Exposed smolt took significantly longer time to initiate migration after release compared to the control fish, but after that we observed no significant difference in downstream migration speed. However, exposed smolt had considerably higher probability of being predated on compared to control smolt. We attribute these results to increased risk-taking and higher activity in oxazepam-exposed smolt, which in turn increased initial non-directional exploratory behavior and decreased predator vigilance. These results are discussed based on current concerns for ecological implications of behavioral modifications induced by pharmaceutical pollution and climate change. We conclude that exposure to oxazepam is an unsuitable management option to prime migration of reared salmon in natural systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Pharmaceutical, Behavior, Ecosystem experiment, Predator-prey, GABAergicD
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162828 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.488 (DOI)000480316300051 ()31212157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-16 Created: 2019-09-16 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Bengtsson, J., Gamfeldt, L., Moen, J. & Snäll, T. (2019). Levels of forest ecosystem services depend on specific mixtures of commercial tree species. Nature Plants, 5(2), 141-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levels of forest ecosystem services depend on specific mixtures of commercial tree species
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2019 (English)In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 141-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global and local ecosystem change resulting in diversity loss has motivated efforts to understand relationships between species diversity and ecosystem services. However, it is unclear how such a general understanding can inform policies for the management of ecosystem services in production systems, because these systems are primarily used for food or fibre, and are rarely managed for the conservation of species diversity. Here, using data from a nationwide forest inventory covering an area of 230,000 km2, we show that relative abundances of commercial tree species in mixed stands strongly influence the potential to provide ecosystem services. The mixes provided higher levels of ecosystem services compared to respective plant monocultures (overyielding or transgressive overyielding) in 35% of the investigated cases, and lower (underyielding) in 9% of the cases. We further show that relative abundances, not just species richness per se, of specific tree-species mixtures affect the potential of forests to provide multiple ecosystem services, which is crucial information for policy and sustainable forest management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Forest Science Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162512 (URN)10.1038/s41477-018-0346-z (DOI)000460479600011 ()30664731 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Polvi, L. E., Sponseller, R. A. & Stenroth, K. (2018). Catchment properties predict autochthony in stream filter feeders. Hydrobiologia, 815(1), 83-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catchment properties predict autochthony in stream filter feeders
2018 (English)In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 815, no 1, p. 83-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stream ecological theory predicts that the use of allochthonous resources declines with increasing channel width, while at the same time primary production and autochthonous carbon use by consumers increase. Although these expectations have found support in several studies, it is not well known how terrestrial runoff and/or inputs of primary production from lakes alter these longitudinal patterns. To investigate this, we analyzed the diet of filter-feeding black fly and caddisfly larvae from 23 boreal streams, encompassing gradients in drainage area, land cover and land use, and distance to nearest upstream lake outlet. In five of these streams, we also sampled repeatedly during autumn to test if allochthony of filter feeders increases over time as new litter inputs are processed. Across sites, filter-feeder autochthony was 21.1-75.1%, did not differ between black fly and caddisfly larvae, was not positively related to drainage area, and did not decrease with distance from lakes. Instead, lake and wetland cover promoted filter-feeder autochthony independently of stream size, whereas catchment-scale forest cover and forestry reduced autochthony. Further, we found no seasonal increase in allochthony, indicating low assimilation of particles derived from autumn litter fall. Hence, catchment properties, rather than local conditions, can influence levels of autochthony in boreal streams.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Allochthony, Aquatic insects, Autochthony, Land cover, Land use, Stream
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148625 (URN)10.1007/s10750-018-3553-8 (DOI)000428815800007 ()
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Lagesson, A., Brodin, T., Fahlman, J., Fick, J., Jonsson, M., Persson, J., . . . Klaminder, J. (2018). No evidence of increased growth or mortality in fish exposed to oxazepam in semi-natural ecosystems. Science of the Total Environment, 615, 608-614
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No evidence of increased growth or mortality in fish exposed to oxazepam in semi-natural ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 615, p. 608-614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of short-term laboratory studies on fish reports behavioral effects from exposure to aquatic contaminants or raised carbon dioxide levels affecting the GABAAreceptor. However, how such GABAergic behavioral modifications (GBMs) impact populations in more complex natural systems is not known. In this study, we induced GBMs in European perch (Perca fluviatilis) via exposure to a GABA agonist (oxazepam) and followed the effects on growth and survival over one summer (70 days) in replicated pond ecosystems. We hypothesized that anticipated GBMs, expressed as anti-anxiety like behaviors (higher activity and boldness levels), that increase feeding rates in laboratory assays, would; i) increase growth and ii) increase mortality from predation. To test our hypotheses, 480 PIT tagged perch of known individual weights, and 12 predators (northern pike, Esox lucius) were evenly distributed in 12 ponds; six control (no oxazepam) and six spiked (15.5 ± 4 μg l− 1 oxazepam [mean ± 1 S.E.]) ponds. Contrary to our hypotheses, even though perch grew on average 16% more when exposed to oxazepam, we found no significant difference between exposed and control fish in growth (exposed: 3.9 ± 1.2 g, control: 2.9 ± 1 g [mean ± 1 S.E.], respectively) or mortality (exposed: 26.5 ± 1.8 individuals pond− 1, control: 24.5 ± 2.6 individuals pond− 1, respectively). In addition, we show that reduced prey capture efficiency in exposed pike may explain the lack of significant differences in predation. Hence, our results suggest that GBMs, which in laboratory studies impact fish behavior, and subsequently also feeding rates, do not seem to generate strong effects on growth and predation-risk in more complex and resource limited natural environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
GABA(A), Behavioral modifications, Ecological effects, Perca fluviatilis, Esox lucius
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142442 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.070 (DOI)000414922600066 ()28988097 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Metcalfe, D. B., Hermans, T. D. G., Ahlstrand, J., Becker, M., Berggren, M., Bjork, R. G., . . . Abdi, A. M. (2018). Patchy field sampling biases understanding of climate change impacts across the Arctic. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2(9), 1443-1448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patchy field sampling biases understanding of climate change impacts across the Arctic
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2018 (English)In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 1443-1448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effective societal responses to rapid climate change in the Arctic rely on an accurate representation of region-specific ecosystem properties and processes. However, this is limited by the scarcity and patchy distribution of field measurements. Here, we use a comprehensive, geo-referenced database of primary field measurements in 1,840 published studies across the Arctic to identify statistically significant spatial biases in field sampling and study citation across this globally important region. We find that 31% of all study citations are derived from sites located within 50 km of just two research sites: Toolik Lake in the USA and Abisko in Sweden. Furthermore, relatively colder, more rapidly warming and sparsely vegetated sites are under-sampled and under-recognized in terms of citations, particularly among microbiology-related studies. The poorly sampled and cited areas, mainly in the Canadian high-Arctic archipelago and the Arctic coastline of Russia, constitute a large fraction of the Arctic ice-free land area. Our results suggest that the current pattern of sampling and citation may bias the scientific consensuses that underpin attempts to accurately predict and effectively mitigate climate change in the region. Further work is required to increase both the quality and quantity of sampling, and incorporate existing literature from poorly cited areas to generate a more representative picture of Arctic climate change and its environmental impacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152218 (URN)10.1038/s41559-018-0612-5 (DOI)000442468000022 ()30013133 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Fahlman, J., Fick, J., Karlsson, J., Jonsson, M., Brodin, T. & Klaminder, J. (2018). Using laboratory incubations to predict the fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic ecosystems. Environmental Chemistry, 15(8), 463-471
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using laboratory incubations to predict the fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Chemistry, ISSN 1448-2517, E-ISSN 1449-8979, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 463-471Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental contextEnvironmental persistence of excreted pharmaceuticals in aquatic ecosystems is usually predicted using small-scale laboratory experiments assumed to simulate natural conditions. We studied five pharmaceuticals comparing their removal rates from water under laboratory conditions and under natural environmental conditions existing in a large pond. We found that the laboratory conditions did not fully capture the complexity within the pond, which led to different removal rates in the two systems. AbstractEnvironmental persistence is a key property when evaluating risks with excreted pharmaceuticals in aquatic ecosystems. Such persistence is typically predicted using small-scale laboratory incubations, but the variation in aquatic environments and scarcity of field studies to verify laboratory-based persistence estimates create uncertainties around the predictive power of these incubations. In this study we: (1) assess the persistence of five pharmaceuticals (diclofenac, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, trimethoprim and oxazepam) in laboratory experiments under different environmental conditions; and (2) use a three-month-long field study in an aquatic ecosystem to verify the laboratory-based persistence estimates. In our laboratory assays, we found that water temperature (TEMP), concentrations of organic solutes (TOC), presence of sediment (SED), and solar radiation (SOL) individually affected dissipation rates. Moreover, we identified rarely studied interaction effects between the treatments (i.e. SOLxSED and TEMPxSOL), which affected the persistence of the studied drugs. Half-lives obtained from the laboratory assays largely explained the dissipation rates during the first week of the field study. However, none of the applied models could accurately predict the long-term dissipation rates (month time-scale) from the water column. For example, the studied antibioticum (trimethoprim) and the anti-anxiety drug (oxazepam) remained at detectable levels in the aquatic environment long after (similar to 150 days) our laboratory based models predicted complete dissipation. We conclude that small-scale laboratory incubations seem sufficient to approximate the short-term (i.e. within a week) dissipation rate of drugs in aquatic ecosystems. However, this simplistic approach does not capture interacting environmental processes that preserve a fraction of the dissolved pharmaceuticals for months in natural water bodies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CSIRO Publishing, 2018
Keywords
antibiotics, antidepressant, anxiolytics, antihistamines, degradation
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154903 (URN)10.1071/EN18154 (DOI)000452149900001 ()
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M. & Canhoto, C. (2017). Climate change and freshwater invertebrates: their role in reciprocal freshwater-terrestrial resource fluxes. In: Scott N. Johnson, T. Hefin Jones (Ed.), Global climate change and terrestrial invertebrates: (pp. 274-294). Chichester, UK.: John Wiley & Sons
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and freshwater invertebrates: their role in reciprocal freshwater-terrestrial resource fluxes
2017 (English)In: Global climate change and terrestrial invertebrates / [ed] Scott N. Johnson, T. Hefin Jones, Chichester, UK.: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 274-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter overviews how climate change might alter resource fluxes between terrestrial and freshwater systems and focuses on the intermediary role of freshwater invertebrates. Global climate change will affect terrestrial vegetation in multiple but different ways at a regional level. Because mean annual temperature and global terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) are positively correlated, and as northern regions are expected to experience the greatest increase in mean annual temperature, increases in NPP will likely be more pronounced at high latitudes and at high elevations. As a consequence of increased terrestrial NPP and increased precipitation, higher levels of organic matter are available to the soil layer. Freshwater systems ‐ especially in northern regions ‐ are predicted to receive increased amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from terrestrial runoff. Freshwater invertebrate secondary production and community composition are closely related with terrestrial input characteristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester, UK.: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
altered terrestrial resource fluxes, dissolved organic matter, freshwater invertebrate secondary production, global climate change, net primary productivity, shoreline vegetation
National Category
Ecology Climate Research Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143243 (URN)10.1002/9781119070894.ch14 (DOI)9781119070900 (ISBN)9781119070894 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lidman, J., Jonsson, M., Burrows, R. M., Bundschuh, M. & Sponseller, R. A. (2017). Composition of riparian litter input regulates organic matter decomposition: Implications for headwater stream functioning in a managed forest landscape. Ecology and Evolution, 7(4), 1068-1077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composition of riparian litter input regulates organic matter decomposition: Implications for headwater stream functioning in a managed forest landscape
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2017 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1068-1077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the importance of stream condition for leaf litter decomposition has been extensively studied, little is known about how processing rates change in response to altered riparian vegetation community composition. We investigated patterns of plant litter input and decomposition across 20 boreal headwater streams that varied in proportions of riparian deciduous and coniferous trees. We measured a suite of in-stream physical and chemical characteristics, as well as the amount and type of litter inputs from riparian vegetation, and related these to decomposition rates of native (alder, birch, and spruce) and introduced (lodgepole pine) litter species incubated in coarse- and fine-mesh bags. Total litter inputs ranged more than fivefold among sites and increased with the proportion of deciduous vegetation in the riparian zone. In line with differences in initial litter quality, mean decomposition rate was highest for alder, followed by birch, spruce, and lodgepole pine (12, 55, and 68% lower rates, respectively). Further, these rates were greater in coarse-mesh bags that allow colonization by macroinvertebrates. Variance in decomposition rate among sites for different species was best explained by different sets of environmental conditions, but litter-input composition (i.e., quality) was overall highly important. On average, native litter decomposed faster in sites with higher-quality litter input and (with the exception of spruce) higher concentrations of dissolved nutrients and open canopies. By contrast, lodgepole pine decomposed more rapidly in sites receiving lower-quality litter inputs. Birch litter decomposition rate in coarse-mesh bags was best predicted by the same environmental variables as in fine-mesh bags, with additional positive influences of macroinvertebrate species richness. Hence, to facilitate energy turnover in boreal headwaters, forest management with focus on conifer production should aim at increasing the presence of native deciduous trees along streams, as they promote conditions that favor higher decomposition rates of terrestrial plant litter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
boreal, introduced species, land use, litter quality, priming effect
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133560 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2726 (DOI)000394501900005 ()28303178 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 217-2012-1418
Available from: 2017-04-11 Created: 2017-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Burrows, R. M., Lidman, J., Fältström, E., Laudon, H. & Sponseller, R. A. (2017). Land use influences macroinvertebrate community composition in boreal headwaters through altered stream conditions. Ambio, 46(3), 311-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Land use influences macroinvertebrate community composition in boreal headwaters through altered stream conditions
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2017 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 311-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Land use is known to alter the nature of land-water interactions, but the potential effects of widespread forest management on headwaters in boreal regions remain poorly understood. We evaluated the importance of catchment land use, land cover, and local stream variables for macroinvertebrate community and functional trait diversity in 18 boreal headwater streams. Variation in macroinvertebrate metrics was often best explained by in-stream variables, primarily water chemistry (e.g. pH). However, variation in stream variables was, in turn, significantly associated with catchment-scale forestry land use. More specifically, streams running through catchments that were dominated by young (11-50 years) forests had higher pH, greater organic matter standing stock, higher abundance of aquatic moss, and the highest macroinvertebrate diversity, compared to streams running through recently clear-cut and old forests. This indicates that catchment-scale forest management can modify in-stream habitat conditions with effects on stream macroinvertebrate communities and that characteristics of younger forests may promote conditions that benefit headwater biodiversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Aquatic insects, Biodiversity, Forestry, Functional traits
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134207 (URN)10.1007/s13280-016-0837-y (DOI)000397818800005 ()27804095 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-20 Created: 2017-06-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1618-2617

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