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Hagfors, Linda
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Kautto, E., Rydén, P., Ivarsson, A., Olsson, C., Norström, F., Högberg, L., . . . Hörnell, A. (2014). What happens to food choices when a gluten-free diet is required?: A prospective longitudinal population-based study among Swedish adolescent with coeliac disease and their peers. Journal of Nutritional Science, 3(e2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What happens to food choices when a gluten-free diet is required?: A prospective longitudinal population-based study among Swedish adolescent with coeliac disease and their peers
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Nutritional Science, ISSN 2048-6790, E-ISSN 2048-6790, Vol. 3, no e2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A dietary survey was performed during a large screening study in Sweden among 13-year-old adolescents. The aim was to study how the intake of food groups was affected by a screening-detected diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and its gluten-free (GF) treatment. Food intake, was reported using a food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) and intake reported by the adolescents who was screened to CD was compared with the intake of two same-aged referent groups: i) adolescents diagnosed to CD prior screening and ii) adolescents without CD.. The food intake groups were measured at baseline before the screening-detected cases were aware of their CD, and 12-18 months later.

The result showed that the food intakes are affected by a screen detected CD and its dietary treatment. Many flour-based foods were reduced such as pizza, fish fingers, and pastries. The result also indicated that the bread intake was lower before the screened diagnosis compared to the other studied groups, but increased afterwards. Specially manufactured GF-products (e.g. pasta and bread) were frequently used in the screened CDgroup after changing to a GF-diet. Our results suggest that changing to a GF-diet reduces the intake of some popular foods, and the ingredients on the plate are altered, but this do not necessarily include a change of food groups. The availability of manufactured GF-replacement products makes it possible for adolescents to keep many of their old food habits when diagnosed with CD in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2014
Keywords
celiac disease, gluten-free diet, food choices, screening
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86027 (URN)10.1017/jns.2013.24 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Rydén, P. & Hagfors, L. (2011). Diet cost, diet quality and socio-economic position: how are they related and what contributes to differences in diet costs?. Public Health Nutrition, 14(9), 1680-1692
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet cost, diet quality and socio-economic position: how are they related and what contributes to differences in diet costs?
2011 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 1680-1692Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine diet costs in relation to dietary quality and socio-economic position, and to investigate underlying reasons for differences in diet costs.

Design: Dietary intake was assessed by a 4 d food diary and evaluated using the 2005 Healthy Eating Index (HEI). National consumer food prices collected by Statistics Sweden and from two online stores/supermarkets were used to estimate diet costs.

Setting: Sweden.

Subjects: A nationally representative sample of 2160 children aged 4, 8 or 11 years.

Results: Higher scores on the HEI resulted in higher diet costs and, conversely, higher diet costs were linked to increased total HEI scores. Children who consumed the most healthy and/or expensive diets ate a more energy-dilute and varied diet compared with those who ate the least healthy and/or least expensive diets. They also consumed more fish, ready meals and fruit. Regression analysis also linked increased food costs to these food groups. There was a positive, but weak, relationship between HEI score and diet cost, parental education and parental occupation respectively.

Conclusions: Healthy eating is associated with higher diet cost in Swedish children, in part because of price differences between healthy and less-healthy foods. The cheapest and most unhealthy diets were found among those children whose parents were the least educated and had manual, low-skill occupations. Our results pose several challenges for public health policy makers, as well as for nutrition professionals, when forming dietary strategies and providing advice for macro- and microlevels in society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2011
Keywords
Diet cost, Food prices, Diet quality, Healthy eating index, Socio-economic position
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-39359 (URN)10.1017/S1368980010003642 (DOI)
Note
FirstView Article,Published online: 24 January 2011 Available from: 2011-02-01 Created: 2011-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ryden, P., Mattsson Sydner, Y. & Hagfors, L. (2008). Counting the cost of healthy eating: a Swedish comparison of Mediterranean-style and ordinary diets. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 32(2), 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Counting the cost of healthy eating: a Swedish comparison of Mediterranean-style and ordinary diets
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this research was to examine the cost of a diet generally regarded as healthy, a Swedish version of the Mediterranean diet, and to compare it with the cost of an ordinary Swedish diet. A total of 30 individuals provided detailed dietary data collected in a randomized intervention study, examining the effect of dietary change to a Mediterranean-style diet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (Mediterranean group, n = 16, control group, n = 14). The data, covering 1-month dietary intake, were examined with three different diet quality indicators to see whether the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. All diet quality indicators showed that the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. Consumer food prices were used to analyse the cost of the different diets. In immediate consumer cost terms, eating a healthier diet was more expensive when differences in energy intake were discounted. However, non-energy adjusted costs showed no significant difference between the groups. Hence, if one of the reasons for choosing a healthier diet is to achieve weight loss – by consuming less energy – it is possible that healthier eating is not more expensive.

Keywords
Healthy diet, Mediterranean diet, Food cost, Economics, Sweden, Healthy diet index
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-9093 (URN)10.1111/j.1470-6431.2007.00656.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-03-28 Created: 2008-03-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sundström, B., Stålnacke, K., Hagfors, L. & Johansson, G. (2006). Supplementation of Omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, 35, 359-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supplementation of Omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ankylosing spondylitis
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, p. 359-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study the effect of supplementation with omega‐3 fatty acids on disease variables and drug consumption in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

Methods: Twenty‐four patients were randomized to either a low‐dose (1.95 g omega‐3/day) or a high‐dose (4.55 g omega‐3/day) supplement. Disease activity, functional impairment, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and drug consumption were assessed during visits at baseline and at weeks 7, 14, and 21.

Results: Eighteen patients completed the study, nine patients from each group. The patients in the high‐dose group exhibited a significant decrease in disease activity according to the Bath Ankylosing Disease Activity Index (BASDAI; p = 0.038), which was not seen in the low‐dose group. Significant differences were not found on drug consumption or in functional capacity in either of the groups. No significant differences were found when comparing the results between the high‐ and low‐dose groups.

Conclusion: Omega‐3 fatty acids in adequate doses may have the capacity to decrease the disease activity of AS. However, larger and better controlled studies are needed before any further conclusions can be made on the extent of this capacity.

Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03009740600844357

National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13549 (URN)10.1080/03009740600844357 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-05-11 Created: 2007-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hagfors, L., Westerterp, K., Sköldstam, L. & Johansson, G. (2006). Validity of the reported energy expenditure and the reported dietary intake of rheumatoid arthritis patients in a dietary intervention study. In: Paper presented at Sixth International Conference on Dietary Assessment Methods, Köpenhamn, Danmark 27-29 april 2006. Köpenhamn, Danmark
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity of the reported energy expenditure and the reported dietary intake of rheumatoid arthritis patients in a dietary intervention study
2006 (English)In: Paper presented at Sixth International Conference on Dietary Assessment Methods, Köpenhamn, Danmark 27-29 april 2006, Köpenhamn, Danmark, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Köpenhamn, Danmark: , 2006
Series
International Conference on Dietary Assessment Methods ; 6
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13554 (URN)
Note
Paper presented at Sixth International Conference on Dietary Assessment Methods, Köpenhamn, Danmark 27-29 april 2006Available from: 2007-05-11 Created: 2007-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Hagfors, L. (2005). A Mediterranean dietary intervention study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, 49(1), 42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mediterranean dietary intervention study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 42-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2005
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13568 (URN)10.1080/11026480510011370 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-05-11 Created: 2007-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Hagfors, L., Nilsson, I., Sköldstam, L. & Johansson, G. (2005). Fat intake and composition of fatty acids in serum phospholipids in a randomized, controlled, parallel, Mediterranean dietary intervention study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Nutrition and Metabolism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fat intake and composition of fatty acids in serum phospholipids in a randomized, controlled, parallel, Mediterranean dietary intervention study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis
2005 (English)In: Nutrition and MetabolismArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5397 (URN)
Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Hagfors, L., Westerterp, K., Sköldstam, L. & Johansson, G. (2005). Validity of reported energy expenditure and reported intake of energy, protein, sodium and potassium in rheumatoid arthritis patients in a dietary intervention study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(2), 238-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity of reported energy expenditure and reported intake of energy, protein, sodium and potassium in rheumatoid arthritis patients in a dietary intervention study
2005 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 238-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of the study was to validate a diet history interview (DHI) method and a 3-day activity registration (AR) with biological markers.

Subjects and study design: The reported dietary intake of 33 rheumatoid arthritis patients (17 patients on a Mediterranean-type diet and 16 patients on a control diet) participating in a dietary intervention study was assessed using the DHI method. The total energy expenditure (TEE), estimated by a 3-day AR, was used to validate the energy intake (EI). For nine subjects the activity registration was also validated by means of the doubly labelled water (DLW) method. The excretion of nitrogen, sodium and potassium in 24-h urine samples was used to validate the intake of protein, sodium and potassium.

Results: There was no significant difference between the EI and the TEE estimated by the activity registration or between the intake of protein, sodium and potassium and their respective biological markers. However, in general, the AR underestimated the TEE compared to the DLW method. No significant differences were found between the subjects in the Mediterranean diet group and the control diet group regarding the relationship between the reported intakes and the biological markers.

Conclusion: The DHI could capture the dietary intake fairly well, and the dietary assessment was not biased by the dietary intervention. The AR showed a bias towards underestimation when compared to the DLW method. This illustrates the importance of valid biological markers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2005
Keywords
rheumatoid arthritis, Mediterranean diet, diet history interview, biological markers, doubly labelled water, energy expenditure
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120437 (URN)10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602064 (DOI)000226690200011 ()15483633 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-02 Created: 2016-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hagfors, L., Westerterp, K., Sköldstam, L. & Johansson, G. (2005). Validity of reported energy expenditure and reported intake of energy, protein, sodium and potassium in rheumatoid arthritis patients on a Cretan Mediterranean diet. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59, 238-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity of reported energy expenditure and reported intake of energy, protein, sodium and potassium in rheumatoid arthritis patients on a Cretan Mediterranean diet
2005 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 59, p. 238-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5398 (URN)
Available from: 2007-05-14 Created: 2007-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Sköldstam, L., Brudin, L., Hagfors, L. & Johansson, G. (2005). Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets. Nutrition Journal, 4(15)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or Mediterranean diets
2005 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, Vol. 4, no 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Food and Nutrition
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13534 (URN)doi:10.1186/1475-2891-4-15 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-05-11 Created: 2007-05-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09
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