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Håkansson, Stellan
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Norman, M., Hallberg, B., Abrahamsson, T., Bjorklund, L. J., Domellöf, M., Farooqi, A., . . . Håkansson, S. (2019). Association Between Year of Birth and 1-Year Survival Among Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden During 2004-2007 and 2014-2016. Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), 321(12), 1188-1199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Year of Birth and 1-Year Survival Among Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden During 2004-2007 and 2014-2016
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 321, no 12, p. 1188-1199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE: Since 2004-2007, national guidelines and recommendations have been developed for the management of extremely preterm births in Sweden. If and how more uniform management has affected infant survival is unknown.

OBJECTIV: To compare survival of extremely preterm infants born during 2004-2007 with survival of infants born during 2014-2016.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All births at 22-26weeks' gestational age (n = 2205) between April 1, 2004, and March 31, 2007, and between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2016, in Sweden were studied. Prospective data collection was used during 2004-2007. Data were obtained from the Swedish pregnancy, medical birth, and neonatal quality registries during 2014-2016. EXPOSURES Delivery at 22-26 weeks' gestational age.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcomewas infant survival to the age of 1 year. The secondary outcome was 1-year survival among live-born infants who did not have any major neonatal morbidity (specifically, without intraventricular hemorrhage grade 3-4, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity stage 3-5, or severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia).

RESULTS: During 2004-2007, 1009 births (3.3/1000 of all births) occurred at 22-26 weeks' gestational age compared with 1196 births (3.4/1000 of all births) during 2014-2016 (P =.61). One-year survival among live-born infants at 22-26 weeks' gestational age was significantly lower during 2004-2007 (497 of 705 infants [70%]) than during 2014-2016 (711 of 923 infants [77%]) (difference, -7%[95% CI, -11% to -2.2%], P =.003). One-year survival among live-born infants at 22-26 weeks' gestational age and without any major neonatal morbidity was significantly lower during 2004-2007 (226 of 705 infants [32%]) than during 2014-2016 (355 of 923 infants [38%]) (difference, -6%[95% CI, -11% to -1.7%], P =.008).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among live births at 22-26 weeks' gestational age in Sweden, 1-year survival improved between 2004-2007 and 2014-2016.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chicago: American Medical Association, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158749 (URN)10.1001/jama.2019.2021 (DOI)000463074900015 ()30912837 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Norman, M., Hellstrom, A., Hallberg, B., Wallin, A., Gustafson, P., Tornqvist, K., . . . Holmstrom, G. (2019). Prevalence of Severe Visual Disability Among Preterm Children With Retinopathy of Prematurity and Association With Adherence to Best Practice Guidelines. JAMA NETWORK OPEN, 2(1), Article ID e186801.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of Severe Visual Disability Among Preterm Children With Retinopathy of Prematurity and Association With Adherence to Best Practice Guidelines
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2019 (English)In: JAMA NETWORK OPEN, ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 2, no 1, article id e186801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) can cause severe visual disability even in high-resource settings. A better understanding of the prevalence and processes leading to ROP-induced severe visual impairment may help health care professionals design preventive measures. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of severe visual disability among children born preterm in Sweden, evaluate adherence to best practice, and determine the health system's structural capacity. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Population-based, nationwide cohort study of 1 310 227 children born between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2015, in Sweden, of whom 17 588 (1.3%) were born very preterm (<32 weeks of gestation). Children born preterm with a verified diagnosis of severe visual disability had their medical records reviewed for evaluation of ROP screening, diagnosis, and treatment. In addition, a questionnaire on structural capacity was sent to all ophthalmology departments. EXPOSURES Stages 4 and 5 ROP. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was prevalence of severe visual disability (visual acuity similar to 20/200 for both eyes) associated with ROP stages 4 and 5. Secondary outcomes included adherence to national ROP guidelines using a predefined protocol with 15 key performance indicators for screening, diagnosis, and treatment; assessment of whether visual disability was deemed avoidable; and examination of structural capacity, including information on equipment and facilities, staffing, and patients. RESULTS Seventeen children (10 boys; mean [range] birth weight, 756 [454-1900] g; mean [range] gestational age, 25 [22-33] weeks) became severely visually disabled because of ROP, corresponding to a prevalence of 1 in 1000 very preterm infants (< 32 weeks of gestational age) and 1 in 77 000 for all live births. Severe visual impairment was considered potentially avoidable in 11 of 17 affected children (65%) owing to untimely or no screening, missed diagnosis, or untimely and suboptimal treatment. Large variations in infrastructure (facilities, guidelines, staffing, and annual patient numbers) were also identified as potential contributors to these findings. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Retinopathy of prematurity still causes severe visual disability in Sweden, resulting in 1 affected infant per 1000 very preterm births. In most of these infants, noncompliance with best practice was identified, indicating that a significant proportion could have been avoided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER MEDICAL ASSOC, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158977 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.6801 (DOI)000465422700045 ()30646195 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Alken, J., Håkansson, S., Ekeus, C., Gustafson, P. & Norman, M. (2019). Rates of Extreme Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia and Kernicterus in Children and Adherence to National Guidelines for Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment in Sweden. JAMA NETWORK OPEN, 2(3), Article ID e190858.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rates of Extreme Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia and Kernicterus in Children and Adherence to National Guidelines for Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment in Sweden
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2019 (English)In: JAMA NETWORK OPEN, ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 2, no 3, article id e190858Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia can cause lifelong neurodevelopmental impairment (kernicterus) even in high-resource settings. A better understanding of the incidence and processes leading to kernicterus may help in the design of preventive measures. OBJECTIVES To determine incidence rates of hazardous hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus among near-term to term newborns and to evaluate health care professional adherence to best practices. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This population-based nationwide cohort study used prospectively collected data on the highest serum bilirubin level for all infants born alive at 35 weeks' gestation or longer and admitted to neonatal care at all 46 delivery and 37 neonatal units in Sweden from 2008 to 2016. Medical records for newborns with hazardous hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated for best neonatal practices and for a diagnosis of kernicterus up to 2 years of age. Data analyses were performed between September 2017 and February 2018. EXPOSURES Extreme (serum bilirubin levels, 25.0-29.9mg/dL [425-509 mu mol/L]) and hazardous (serum bilirubin levels, >30.0mg/dL [>510 mu mol/L]) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was kernicterus, defined as hazardous neonatal hyperbilirubinemia followed by cerebral palsy, sensorineural hearing loss, gaze paralysis, or neurodevelopmental retardation. Secondary outcomeswere health care professional adherence to national guidelines using a predefined protocol with 10 key performance indicators for diagnosis and treatment as well as assessment of whether bilirubin-associated brain damage might have been avoidable. RESULTS Among 992 378 live-born infants (958 051 term births and 34 327 near-term births), 494 (320 boys; mean [SD] birth weight, 3505 [527] g) developed extreme hyperbilirubinemia (50 per 100 000 infants), 6.8 per 100 000 infants developed hazardous hyperbilirubinemia, and 1.3 per 100 000 infants developed kernicterus. Among 13 children developing kernicterus, brain injury was assessed as potentially avoidable for 11 children based on the presence of 1 or several of the following possible causes: untimely or lack of predischarge bilirubin screening (n = 6), misinterpretation of bilirubin values (n = 2), untimely or delayed initiation of treatment with intensive phototherapy (n = 1), untimely or no treatment with exchange transfusion (n = 6), or lack of repeated exchange transfusions despite indication (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hazardous hyperbilirubinemia in near-term or term newborns still occurs in Sweden and was associated with disabling brain damage in 13 per million births. For most of these cases, health care professional noncompliance with best practices was identified, suggesting that a substantial proportion of these cases might have been avoided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER MEDICAL ASSOC, 2019
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158970 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.0858 (DOI)000465424000011 ()30901042 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Norman, M., Källén, K., Wahlström, E. & Håkansson, S. (2019). The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register: contents, completeness and validity. Acta Paediatrica, 108(8), 1411-1418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Neonatal Quality Register: contents, completeness and validity
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ) and to determine its completeness and agreement with other registers.

Methods: SNQ collects data for infants admitted to neonatal units during the first four postnatal weeks. Completeness and registers' agreement were determined cross-linking SNQ data with Swedish population registers (the Inpatient, Medical Birth and Cause of Death Registers) for a study period of five years.

Results: In total, 84 712 infants were hospitalised. A total of 52 806 infants occurred in both SNQ and the population registers; 28 692 were only found in the population registers, and 3214 infants were only found in SNQ. Between gestational weeks 24-34, completeness of SNQ was 98-99%. Below and above these gestational ages, completeness was lower. Infants missing in SNQ were term or near-term in 99% of the cases, and their diagnoses indicated conditions managed in maternity units, or re-admissions for acute infections, managed in paediatric units. For most diagnoses, the agreement between SNQ and population registers was high, but some (bronchopulmonary dysplasia and grade of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy) were often missing in the population registers.

Conclusion: SNQ completeness and agreement against other registers, especially for preterm infants, is excellent. SNQ is a valid tool for benchmarking, quality improvement and research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Completeness, Newborn infant, Quality of neonatal care, Register, Validation
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161813 (URN)10.1111/apa.14823 (DOI)000474935600009 ()31006126 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Lui, K., Lee, S. K., Kusuda, S., Adams, M., Vento, M., Reichman, B., . . . Shah, P. S. (2019). Trends in Outcomes for Neonates Born Very Preterm and Very Low Birth Weight in 11 High-Income Countries. Journal of Pediatrics, 215, 32-40.e14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in Outcomes for Neonates Born Very Preterm and Very Low Birth Weight in 11 High-Income Countries
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 215, p. 32-40.e14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcome trends of neonates born very preterm in 11 high-income countries participating in the International Network for Evaluating Outcomes of neonates.

STUDY DESIGN: In a retrospective cohort study, we included 154 233 neonates admitted to 529 neonatal units between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, at 240/7 to 316/7 weeks of gestational age and birth weight <1500 g. Composite outcomes were in-hospital mortality or any of severe neurologic injury, treated retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD); and same composite outcome excluding BPD. Secondary outcomes were mortality and individual morbidities. For each country, annual outcome trends and adjusted relative risks comparing epoch 2 (2012-2015) to epoch 1 (2007-2011) were analyzed.

RESULTS: For composite outcome including BPD, the trend decreased in Canada and Israel but increased in Australia and New Zealand, Japan, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. For composite outcome excluding BPD, the trend decreased in all countries except Spain, Sweden, Tuscany, and the United Kingdom. The risk of composite outcome was lower in epoch 2 than epoch 1 in Canada (adjusted relative risks 0.78; 95% CI 0.74-0.82) only. The risk of composite outcome excluding BPD was significantly lower in epoch 2 compared with epoch 1 in Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Finland, Japan, and Switzerland. Mortality rates reduced in most countries in epoch 2. BPD rates increased significantly in all countries except Canada, Israel, Finland, and Tuscany.

CONCLUSIONS: In most countries, mortality decreased whereas BPD increased for neonates born very preterm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
bronchopulmonary dysplasia, low birthweight, neonatal outcomes, preterm infant, retrospective study
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166608 (URN)10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.08.020 (DOI)000498003100008 ()31587861 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Shahroor, M., Lehtonen, L., Lee, S. K., Håkansson, S., Vento, M., Darlow, B. A., . . . Shah, P. S. (2019). Unit-Level Variations in Healthcare Professionals' Availability for Preterm Neonates < 29 Weeks' Gestation: An International Survey. Neonatology, 116(4), 347-355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unit-Level Variations in Healthcare Professionals' Availability for Preterm Neonates < 29 Weeks' Gestation: An International Survey
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2019 (English)In: Neonatology, ISSN 1661-7800, E-ISSN 1661-7819, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 347-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The availability of and variability in healthcare professionals in neonatal units in different countries has not been well characterized. Our objective was to identify variations in the healthcare professionals for preterm neonates in 10 national or regional neonatal networks participating in the International Network for Evaluating Outcomes (iNeo) of neonates.

Method: Online, pre-piloted questionnaires about the availability of healthcare professionals were sent to the directors of 390 tertiary neonatal units in 10 international networks: Australia/New Zealand, Canada, Finland, Illinois, Israel, Japan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Tuscany.

Results: Overall, 325 of 390 units (83%) responded. About half of the units (48%; 156/325) cared for 11-30 neonates/day and had team-based (43%; 138/325) care models. Neonatologists were present 24 h a day in 59% of the units (191/325), junior doctors in 60% (194/325), and nurse practitioners in 36% (116/325). A nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1 for infants who are unstable and require complex care was used in 52% of the units (170/325), whereas a ratio of 1:1 or 1:2 for neonates requiring multisystem support was available in 59% (192/325) of the units. Availability of a respiratory therapist (15%, 49/325), pharmacist (40%, 130/325), dietitian (34%, 112/325), social worker (81%, 263/325), lactation consultant (45%, 146/325), parent buddy (6%, 19/325), or parents' resource personnel (11%, 34/325) were widely variable between units.

Conclusions: We identified variability in the availability and organization of the healthcare professionals between and within countries for the care of extremely preterm neonates. Further research is needed to associate healthcare workers' availability and outcomes. (C) 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
Keywords
Neonatologist, Nurse, Respiratory therapist, Pharmacist, Dietitian, Preterm infant, Neonate
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167033 (URN)10.1159/000501801 (DOI)000503263300006 ()31574502 (PubMedID)
Note

On behalf of the International Network for Evaluation of Outcomes (iNeo) of neonates.

Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Smith, L. K., Morisaki, N., Morken, N.-H., Gissler, M., Deb-Rinker, P., Rouleau, J., . . . Kramer, M. S. (2018). An International Comparison of Death Classification at 22 to 25 Weeks' Gestational Age. Pediatrics, 142(1), Article ID e20173324.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An International Comparison of Death Classification at 22 to 25 Weeks' Gestational Age
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2018 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 142, no 1, article id e20173324Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To explore international differences in the classification of births at extremely low gestation and the subsequent impact on the calculation of survival rates.

METHODS: We used national data on births at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation from the United States (2014; n = 11144), Canada (2009-2014; n = 5668), the United Kingdom (2014-2015; n = 2992), Norway (2010-2014; n = 409), Finland (2010-2015; n = 348), Sweden (2011-2014; n = 489), and Japan (2014-2015; n = 2288) to compare neonatal survival rates using different denominators: all births, births alive at the onset of labor, live births, live births surviving to 1 hour, and live births surviving to 24 hours.

RESULTS: For births at 22 weeks' gestation, neonatal survival rates for which we used live births as the denominator varied from 3.7% to 56.7% among the 7 countries. This variation decreased when the denominator was changed to include stillbirths (ie, all births [1.8%-22.3%] and fetuses alive at the onset of labor [3.7%-38.2%]) or exclude early deaths and limited to births surviving at least 12 hours (50.0%-77.8%). Similar trends were seen for infants born at 23 weeks' gestation. Variation diminished considerably at 24 and 25 weeks' gestation.

CONCLUSIONS: International variation in neonatal survival rates at 22 to 23 weeks' gestation diminished considerably when including stillbirths in the denominator, revealing the variation arises in part from differences in the proportion of births reported as live births, which itself is closely connected to the provision of active care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ACAD PEDIATRICS, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150748 (URN)10.1542/peds.2017-3324 (DOI)000437262600008 ()29899042 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049592000 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Persson, M., Shah, P. S., Rusconi, F., Reichman, B., Modi, N., Kusuda, S., . . . Norman, M. (2018). Association of Maternal Diabetes With Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm and Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants: an International Cohort Study. JAMA pediatrics, 172(9), 867-875
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of Maternal Diabetes With Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm and Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants: an International Cohort Study
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2018 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 172, no 9, p. 867-875Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

IMPORTANCE: Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with a 2-times to 3-times higher rate of very preterm birth than in women without diabetes. Very preterm infants are at high risk of death and severe morbidity. The association of maternal diabetes with these risks is unclear.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations between maternal diabetes and in-hospital mortality, as well as neonatal morbidity in very preterm infants with a birth weight of less than 1500 g.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted at 7 national networks in high-income countries that are part of the International Neonatal Network for Evaluating Outcomes in Neonates and used prospectively collected data on 76 360 very preterm, singleton infants without malformations born between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, at 24 to 31 weeks' gestation with birth weights of less than 1500 g, 3280 (4.3%) of whom were born to diabetic mothers. EXPOSURES Any type of diabetes during pregnancy.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were severe neonatal morbidities, including intraventricular hemorrhages of grade 3 to 4, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity needing treatment and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and other morbidities, including respiratory distress, treated patent ductus arteriosus, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals were estimated, adjusted for potential confounders, and stratified by gestational age (GA), sex, and network.

RESULTS: The mean (SD) birth weight of offspring born to mothers with diabetes was significantly higher at 1081 (262) g than in offspring born to mothers without diabetes (mean [SD] birth weight, 1027 [270] g). Of 76 360 infants, 25 962 (34%) and 33 598 (44%) were born before 28 weeks of gestation to mothers with and without diabetes, respectively. Mothers with diabetes were older and had more hypertensive disorders, antenatal steroid treatments, and deliveries by cesarean delivery than mothers without diabetes. Infants of mothers with diabetes were born at a later GA than infants of mothers without diabetes. In-hospital mortality (6.6% vs 8.3%) and the composite of mortality and severe morbidity (31.6% vs 40.6%) were lower in infants of mothers with diabetes. However, in adjusted analyses, no significant differences in in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR, 1.16 (95% CI, 0.97-1.39) or the composite of mortality and severe morbidity (adjusted OR, 0.99 (95% CI, 0.88-1.10) were observed. With few exceptions, outcomes of infants born to mothers with and without diabetes were similar regardless of infant sex, GA, or country of birth.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In high-resource settings, maternal diabetes is not associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality or severe morbidity in very preterm infants with a birth weight of fewer than 1500 g.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152266 (URN)10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.1811 (DOI)000443915000018 ()29971428 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Refsum, E., Håkansson, S., Mortberg, A., Wikman, A. & Westgren, M. (2018). Intracranial hemorrhages in neonates born from 32 weeks of gestation - low frequency of associated fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a register-based study. Transfusion, 58(1), 223-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intracranial hemorrhages in neonates born from 32 weeks of gestation - low frequency of associated fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a register-based study
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2018 (English)In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a rare condition, with an estimated incidence of one in 1000 to 2000 live births. Predominantly, FNAIT is due to maternal alloantibodies that target paternally derived human platelet antigen (HPA) 1a. The most feared complication is an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of associated maternal platelet (PLT) alloimmunization in a population of neonates born from 32 weeks of gestation and diagnosed with an ICH.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The Swedish Neonatal Quality (SNQ) register was used to identify neonates diagnosed with an ICH born between 2003 and 2012. Mothers were invited to donate peripheral blood, to investigate their HPA-1a antigen status, and test for anti-HPA and anti-HLA Class I alloantibodies. Clinical data for the neonates were retrieved from the SNQ register and available clinical records.

RESULTS: Of 286 registered neonates, 278 mothers were contacted. Of 105 analyzed maternal samples, two (1.9%) were HPA-1a antigen negative. Antibody analyses revealed in total three (2.9%) mothers with anti-HPA: one mother (0.94%) with anti-HPA-1a and two mothers (1.9%) with anti-HPA-5b, of whom one had concurrent anti-HPA-15a. Twenty-four percent tested positive for anti-HLA Class I antibodies. A total of 8.5% of neonates (5/59) with PLT counts available in clinical records were severely thrombocytopenic, with PLT counts of less than 50 × 109/L.

CONCLUSIONS: This retrospective cohort revealed a wide range of factors associated with ICH in neonates born from 32 weeks of gestation and suggests PLT alloimmunization to be a less common contributor than anticipated.

National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144088 (URN)10.1111/trf.14394 (DOI)000419507100032 ()29119564 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Shah, P. S., Kusuda, S., Håkansson, S., Reichman, B., Lui, K., Lehtonen, L., . . . Lee, S. K. (2018). Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm or Very Low Birth Weight Triplets. Pediatrics, 142(6), Article ID e20181938.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm or Very Low Birth Weight Triplets
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2018 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 142, no 6, article id e20181938Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To compare the neonatal outcomes of very preterm triplets with those of matched singletons using a large international cohort. METHODS: A retrospective matched-cohort study of preterm triplets and singletons born between 2007 and 2013 in the International Network for Evaluation of Outcomes in neonates database countries and matched by gestational age, sex, and country of birth was conducted. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality or severe neonatal morbidity (severe neurologic injury, treated retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for model 1 (maternal hypertension and birth weight z score) and model 2 (variables in model 1, antenatal steroids, and mode of birth). Models were fitted with generalizing estimating equations and random effects modeling to account for clustering. RESULTS: A total of 6079 triplets of 24 to 32 weeks' gestation or 500 to 1499 g birth weight and 18 232 matched singletons were included. There was no difference in the primary outcome between triplets and singletons (23.4% vs 24.0%, adjusted odds ratio: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83-1.01 for model 1 and 1.00, 95% CI: 0.90-1.11 for model 2). Rates of severe neonatal morbidities did not differ significantly between triplets and singletons. The results were also similar for a subsample of the cohort (1648 triplets and 4944 matched singletons) born at 24 to 28 weeks' gestation. CONCLUSIONS: No significant differences were identified in mortality or major neonatal morbidities between triplets who were very low birth weight or very preterm and matched singletons.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ACAD PEDIATRICS, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154336 (URN)10.1542/peds.2018-1938 (DOI)000451372200030 ()30463851 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
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