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Eriksson, Per-Olof
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Eriksson, P.-O., Zafar, H. & Backén, M. (2019). Instant reduction in postural sway during quiet standing by intraoral dental appliance in patients with Whiplash associated Disorders and non-trauma neck pain. Archives of Oral Biology, 97, 109-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Instant reduction in postural sway during quiet standing by intraoral dental appliance in patients with Whiplash associated Disorders and non-trauma neck pain
2019 (English)In: Archives of Oral Biology, ISSN 0003-9969, E-ISSN 1879-1506, Vol. 97, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study tested the hypothesis that modulation of jaw sensorimotor control by intraoral dental appliance can reduce postural sway during quiet standing and hence improve standing balance, in patients with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and non-trauma neck pain. Design: Postural sway during quiet standing with feet together was examined in 54 WAD patients (40 females) and 10 non-trauma patients (8 females) using wireless 3D movement recording technique. Recordings were performed alternating without and with intraoral dental appliance, and with closed eyes and open eyes, respectively. In this protocol the participants served as their own controls. A reference group of 30 healthy subjects (17 females) was also recorded. Each recording lasted 120 s, followed by 3-5 min of rest. Speed, acceleration and perimeter of postural sway area were documented. Results: In the patients, but not in the healthy group, the intraoral dental appliance instantly and significantly reduced standing postural sway in recordings with closed and open eyes. Conclusions: The prompt reduction in standing postural sway from intervention by intraoral dental appliance i.e. improved standing balance, suggests a potent effect on the postural control system by modulation of the jaw sensorimotor system, probably involving reflex transmission. The result opens for new insight into mechanisms behind postural control and the pathophysiology of balance disorders, and adds to the knowledge on plasticity of the nervous system. It may help developing new procedures for assessment and management of impaired balance in WAD and non-trauma neck pain patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2019
Keywords
Balance, Postural sway, Intraoral dental appliance, Jaw, Neck, Non-trauma neck pain, Pain, Postural ntrol, Whiplash associated disorders, WAD
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154328 (URN)10.1016/j.archoralbio.2018.10.018 (DOI)000451492700016 ()30384151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Thornell, L.-E., Carlsson, L., Eriksson, P.-O., Liu, J.-X., Österlund, C., Stål, P. & Pedrosa-Domellöf, F. (2015). Fibre typing of intrafusal fibres. Journal of Anatomy, 227(2), 136-156
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fibre typing of intrafusal fibres
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Anatomy, ISSN 0021-8782, E-ISSN 1469-7580, Vol. 227, no 2, p. 136-156Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The first descriptions of muscle spindles with intrafusal fibres containing striated myofibrils and nervous elements were given approximately 150years ago. It took, however, another 100years to establish the presence of two types of intrafusal muscle fibres: nuclear bag and nuclear chain fibres. The present paper highlights primarily the contribution of Robert Banks in fibre typing of intrafusal fibres: the confirmation of the principle of two types of nuclear bag fibres in mammalian spindles and the variation in occurrence of a dense M-band along the fibres. Furthermore, this paper summarizes how studies from the Umea University group (Laboratory of Muscle Biology in the Department of Integrative Medical Biology) on fibre typing and the structure and composition of M-bands have contributed to the current understanding of muscle spindle complexity in adult humans as well as to muscle spindle development and effects of ageing. The variable molecular composition of the intrafusal sarcomeres with respect to myosin heavy chains and M-band proteins gives new perspectives on the role of the intrafusal myofibrils as stretch-activated sensors influencing tension/stiffness and signalling to nuclei.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
Keywords
cytoskeleton, M-band, M-protein, muscle spindle, myomesin, nuclear bag, nuclear chain, titin
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106768 (URN)10.1111/joa.12338 (DOI)000357951900004 ()26179023 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Häggman-Henrikson, B., Nordh, E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2013). Increased sternocleidomastoid, but not trapezius, muscle activity in response to increased chewing load. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 121(5), 443-449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased sternocleidomastoid, but not trapezius, muscle activity in response to increased chewing load
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous findings, during chewing, that boluses of larger size and harder texture result in larger amplitudes of both mandibular and head-neck movements suggest a relationship between increased chewing load and incremental recruitment of jaw and neck muscles. The present report evaluated jaw (masseter and digastric) and neck [sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and trapezius] muscle activity during the chewing of test foods of different sizes and textures by 10 healthy subjects. Muscle activity was recorded by surface electromyography and simultaneous mandibular and head movements were recorded using an optoelectronic technique. Each subject performed continuous jaw-opening/jaw-closing movements whilst chewing small and large boluses of chewing gum and rubber silicone (Optosil). For jaw opening/jaw closing without a bolus, SCM activity was recorded for jaw opening concomitantly with digastric activity. During chewing, SCM activity was recorded for jaw closing concomitantly with masseter activity. Trapezius activity was present in some, but not all, cycles. For the masseter and SCM muscles, higher activity was seen with larger test foods, suggesting increased demand and recruitment of these muscles in response to an increased chewing load. This result reinforces the previous notion of a close functional connection between the jaw and the neck motor systems in jaw actions and has scientific and clinical significance for studying jaw function and dysfunction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
electromyography, masticatory muscles, mastication, jaw, neck muscles
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83091 (URN)10.1111/eos.12066 (DOI)000324315700008 ()
Available from: 2013-11-18 Created: 2013-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Österlund, C., Liu, J.-X., Thornell, L.-E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2013). Intrafusal myosin heavy chain expression of human masseter and biceps muscles at young age shows fundamental similarities but also marked differences. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 139(6), 895-907
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intrafusal myosin heavy chain expression of human masseter and biceps muscles at young age shows fundamental similarities but also marked differences
2013 (English)In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 139, no 6, p. 895-907Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Muscle spindles are skeletal muscle mechanoreceptors that provide proprioceptive information to the central nervous system. The human adult masseter muscle has greater number, larger and more complex muscle spindles than the adult biceps. For a better knowledge of muscle diversity and physiological properties, this study examined the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression of muscle spindle intrafusal fibres in the human young masseter and young biceps muscles by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different MyHC isoforms. Eight MyHC isoforms were detected in both muscles-slow-tonic, I, IIa, IIx, foetal, embryonic, α-cardiac and an isoform not previously reported in intrafusal fibres, termed IIx'. Individual fibres co-expressed 2-6 isoforms. MyHC-slow tonic separated bag(1), AS-bag(1) and bag(2) fibres from chain fibres. Typically, bag fibres also expressed MyHC-I and α-cardiac, whereas chain fibres expressed IIa and foetal. In the young masseter 98 % of bag(1) showed MyHC-α cardiac versus 30 % in the young biceps, 35 % of bag(2) showed MyHC-IIx' versus none in biceps, 17 % of the chain fibres showed MyHC-I versus 61 % in the biceps. In conclusion, the result showed fundamental similarities in intrafusal MyHC expression between young masseter and biceps, but also marked differences implying muscle-specific proprioceptive control, probably related to diverse evolutionary and developmental origins. Finding of similarities in MyHC expression between young and adult masseter and biceps muscle spindles, respectively, in accordance with previously reported similarities in mATPase fibre type composition suggest early maturation of muscle spindles, preceding extrafusal fibres in growth and maturation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Jaw, Limb, Human, Muscle spindles, Intrafusal fibres, Myosin heavy chain, Immuno-histochemistry
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46771 (URN)10.1007/s00418-012-1072-7 (DOI)000319167800008 ()23306907 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-09-13 Created: 2011-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Österlund, C., Lindström, M., Thornell, L.-E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2012). Remarkable heterogeneity in myosin heavy-chain composition of the human young masseter compared with young biceps brachii. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 138(4), 669-682
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remarkable heterogeneity in myosin heavy-chain composition of the human young masseter compared with young biceps brachii
2012 (English)In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 138, no 4, p. 669-682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adult human jaw muscles differ from limb and trunk muscles in enzyme-histochemical fibre type composition. Recently, we showed that the human masseter and biceps differ in fibre type pattern already at childhood. The present study explored the myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) expression in the young masseter and biceps muscles by means of gel electrophoresis (GE) and immuno-histochemical (IHC) techniques. Plasticity in MyHC expression during life was evaluated by comparing the results with the previously reported data for adult muscles. In young masseter, GE identified MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa MyHC-IIx and small proportions of MyHC-fetal and MyHC-alpha cardiac. Western blots confirmed the presence of MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa and MyHC-IIx. IHC revealed in the masseter six isomyosins, MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa, MyHC-IIx, MyHC-fetal, MyHC alpha-cardiac and a previously not reported isoform, termed MyHC-IIx'. The majority of the masseter fibres co-expressed two to four isoforms. In the young biceps, both GE and IHC identified MyHC-I, MyHC-IIa and MyHC-IIx. MyHC-I predominated in both muscles. Young masseter showed more slow and less-fast and fetal MyHC than the adult and elderly masseter. These results provide evidence that the young masseter muscle is unique in MyHC composition, expressing MyHC-alpha cardiac and MyHC-fetal isoforms as well as hitherto unrecognized potential spliced isoforms of MyHC-fetal and MyHC-IIx. Differences in masseter MyHC expression between young adult and elderly suggest a shift from childhood to adulthood towards more fast contractile properties. Differences between masseter and biceps are proposed to reflect diverse evolutionary and developmental origins and confirm that the masseter and biceps present separate allotypes of muscle.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46738 (URN)10.1007/s00418-012-0985-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-09-13 Created: 2011-09-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Österlund, C., Thornell, L.-E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2011). Differences in fibre type composition between human masseter and biceps muscles in young and adults reveal unique masseter fibre type growth pattern. Anatomical Record, 294(7), 1158-1169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in fibre type composition between human masseter and biceps muscles in young and adults reveal unique masseter fibre type growth pattern
2011 (English)In: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 294, no 7, p. 1158-1169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The human jaw system is different from those of other primates, carnivores, ruminants, and rodents in temporomandibular joint and muscle anatomy. In adults, jaw muscles also differ markedly from limb and trunk muscles in composition and distribution of fibre types. It can be assumed that age-related changes between young age to adulthood in terms of craniofacial growth, teeth eruption, and improvement of jaw functions are paralleled by alterations also in composition and distribution of jaw muscle fibre types. To address this question, we have examined the fibre type composition of the human masseter, a jaw closing muscle, at young age. For comparison, the young biceps brachii was examined. The results were compared with previous data for adult masseter and biceps muscles. Young masseter and biceps were similar in that type I fibres outnumbered other fibre types and were of the same diameter. However, they differed in composition of other fibre types. Young masseter contained fibre types I, IM, IIC, IIAB, IIB, and scarce IIA, with regional differences, whereas young biceps showed types I, IIA, IIAB, and few IIB. Young masseter differed from young biceps also by smaller type II fibre diameter and by containing fetal MyHC. In addition, the masseter and biceps differed in age-related changes of composition and distribution of fibre types between young age and adulthood. We conclude that the human masseter is specialized in fibre types already at young age and shows a unique fibre type growth pattern, in concordance with being a separate allotype of muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Liss, Inc., 2011
Keywords
enzyme- and immuno-histochemistry, fibre types, jaw, limb, morphology, myosin heavy chain
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Human Anatomy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46418 (URN)10.1002/ar.21272 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-09-01 Created: 2011-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Häggman Henrikson, B., Grönqvist, J. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2011). Frequent jaw-face pain in chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders. Swedish Dental Journal, 35(3), 123-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequent jaw-face pain in chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders
2011 (English)In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders (WAD) present with frequent pain in the neck, head and shoulder regions but the presence of frequent jaw-face pain is unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency of jaw-face pain in other regions, and general symptoms in chronic WAD patients. Fifty whiplash-patients  and 50 healthy age- and sex-matched controls were examined by qustionnaire for pain in the jaw-face, pain in other regions and other symptoms.

In contrast to healthy, a majority of the WAD patients (88%) reported frequent pain in the jaw-face, in addition to frequent pain in the neck (100%), shoulders (94%), head (90%) and back (72%). The WAD patients also reported stiffness and numbness in the jaw-face region, and frequent general symptoms such as balance problems, stress and sleep disturbances.

The result suggests that frequent pain in the jaw-face can be part of the spectrum of symptoms in chronic WAD. The finding of self-reported numbness in the jaw-face indicates disturbed trigeminal nerve function and merits further investigation. We conclude that assessment of WAD should include pain in the jaw-face region. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation program including dentists, preferably specialized in the area of orofacial pain, should be advocated after whiplash injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jönköping: , 2011
Keywords
face, jaw, neck, pain, whiplash injuries
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49021 (URN)000297003100003 ()
Available from: 2011-10-31 Created: 2011-10-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Österlund, C., Liu, J.-X., Thornell, L.-E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2011). Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation. Anatomical Record, 294(4), 683-693
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation
2011 (English)In: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 294, no 4, p. 683-693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Liss, Inc., 2011
Keywords
fiber types; intrafusal fibers; jaw muscle; skeletal muscle
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41345 (URN)10.1002/ar.21347 (DOI)21370492 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-23 Created: 2011-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Granberg, I., Lindell, B., Eriksson, P.-O., Pedrosa-Domellöf, F. & Stål, P. (2010). Capillary supply in relation to myosin heavy chain fibre composition of human intrinsic tongue muscles. Cells Tissues Organs, 192(5), 303-313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capillary supply in relation to myosin heavy chain fibre composition of human intrinsic tongue muscles
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2010 (English)In: Cells Tissues Organs, ISSN 1422-6405, E-ISSN 1422-6421, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 303-313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The capillary supply and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition of three different intrinsic tongue muscles was analysed in the anterior and posterior regions of the human tongue with biochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Mean capillary density for the whole tongue was 796 ± 82 cap/mm², without regional differences. The overall number of capillaries around each fibre (CAF) was higher in the posterior than in the anterior region (2.5 vs. 2.1, p = 0.009). However, correcting for regional differences in fibre size, CAF per fibre area was higher in the anterior region (4.3 vs. 3.0, p < 0.001). Muscle fibres containing fast MyHCs predominated in the anterior region (78.7%), consisting of MyHCIIa (58.5%), MyHCIIx (1.0%), MyHCIIa+MyHCIIx (11.3%) and MyHCI+MyHCIIa (7.9%). Fibres containing slow MyHC predominated in the posterior region (65.2%), consisting of MyHCI (45.5%) and MyHCI+MyHCIIa (19.7%). A minor fibre population (<2%) contained unusual MyHC isoforms, namely MyHC foetal, MyHC slow-tonic, MyHC α-cardiac or MyHC embryonic. The microvascularization of the human tongue was twice as high as in human limb muscles. Regional similarities in capillary supply, but differences in fibre phenotype composition, suggest that human tongue muscle fibres are fatigue resistant independently of MyHC content. High frequency of hybrid fibres, that is fibres co-expressing two or more MyHC isoforms, indicates a wider spectrum of fibre contractile properties than in limb muscles. In conclusion, human intrinsic tongue muscles showed internal specialization in distribution of MyHC isoforms and capillary supply, but not in the expression of unusual MyHCs.

Keywords
Tongue, Muscle, Human, Myosin heavy chain, Fibre types, Capillaries
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Human Anatomy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-39530 (URN)10.1159/000318645 (DOI)000283131500003 ()20616532 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kalezic, N., Noborisaka, Y., Nakata, M., Crenshaw, A. G., Karlsson, S., Lyskov, E. & Eriksson, P.-O. (2010). Cardiovascular and muscle activity during chewing in whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Archives of Oral Biology, 55(6), 447-453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular and muscle activity during chewing in whiplash-associated disorders (WAD)
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2010 (English)In: Archives of Oral Biology, ISSN 0003-9969, E-ISSN 1879-1506, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 447-453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

More intense response to chewing in WAD might indicate pronounced vulnerability to dynamic loading of the jaw-neck motor system with increased autonomic reactivity to the test. Premature termination and autonomic involvement without EMG signs of muscle fatigue may indicate central mechanisms behind insufficient endurance during chewing.

Keywords
Jaw–neck pain; Chewing; Autonomic reactivity; Endurance; Fatigue; Whiplash-associated disorder
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-39528 (URN)10.1016/j.archoralbio.2010.03.015 (DOI)000279100100008 ()20413105 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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