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Sörelius, K., Svensson, J., Matthiessen, P., Rutegård, J. & Rutegård, M. (2019). A nationwide study on the incidence of mesenteric ischaemia after surgery for rectal cancer demonstrates an association with high arterial ligation. Colorectal Disease, 21(8), 925-931
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A nationwide study on the incidence of mesenteric ischaemia after surgery for rectal cancer demonstrates an association with high arterial ligation
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2019 (English)In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 925-931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The incidence of mesenteric ischaemia after resection for rectal cancer has not been investigated in a population-based setting. The use of high ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery might cause such ischaemia, as the bowel left in situ depends on collateral blood supply after a high tie.

Method: The Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry was used to identify all patients subjected to an abdominal resection for rectal cancer during the years 2007-2017 inclusive. Mesenteric ischaemia within the first 30 postoperative days was recorded, classified as either stoma necrosis or colonic necrosis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mesenteric ischaemia in relation to high tie, with adjustment for confounding.

Results: Some 14 657 patients were included, of whom 59 (0.40%) had a reoperation for any type of mesenteric ischaemia, divided into 34 and 25 cases of stoma necrosis and colonic necrosis, respectively. Compared with patients who did not require reoperation for mesenteric ischaemia following rectal cancer surgery, the proportion having high tie was greater (54.2% vs 38.5%; P = 0.032). The adjusted OR for reoperation due to any mesenteric ischaemia with high tie was 2.26 (95% CI 1.34-3.79), while the corresponding estimates for stoma and colonic necrosis, respectively, were 1.60 (95% CI 0.81-3.17) and 3.69 (95% CI 1.57-8.66).

Conclusion: The incidence of reoperation for mesenteric ischaemia after abdominal resection for rectal cancer is low, but the use of a high tie might increase the risk of colonic necrosis demanding surgery.

Keywords
Inferior mesenteric artery, high tie, low tie, stoma necrosis, bowel ischaemia, central ligation, proximal ligation
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162667 (URN)10.1111/codi.14674 (DOI)000478607100012 ()31062468 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-04 Created: 2019-09-04 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
Ward, H. A., Murphy, N., Weiderpass, E., Leitzmann, M. F., Aglago, E., Gunter, M. J., . . . Cross, A. J. (2019). Gallstones and incident colorectal cancer in a large pan-European cohort study. International Journal of Cancer, 145(6), 1510-1516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gallstones and incident colorectal cancer in a large pan-European cohort study
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 145, no 6, p. 1510-1516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gallstones, a common gastrointestinal condition, can lead to several digestive complications and can result in inflammation. Risk factors for gallstones include obesity, diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity, all of which are known risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), as is inflammation. However, it is unclear whether gallstones are a risk factor for CRC. We examined the association between history of gallstones and CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, a prospective cohort of over half a million participants from ten European countries. History of gallstones was assessed at baseline using a self‐reported questionnaire. The analytic cohort included 334,986 participants; a history of gallstones was reported by 3,917 men and 19,836 women, and incident CRC was diagnosed among 1,832 men and 2,178 women (mean follow‐up: 13.6 years). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between gallstones and CRC were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models, stratified by sex, study centre and age at recruitment. The models were adjusted for body mass index, diabetes, alcohol intake and physical activity. A positive, marginally significant association was detected between gallstones and CRC among women in multivariable analyses (HR = 1.14, 95%CI 0.99–1.31, p = 0.077). The relationship between gallstones and CRC among men was inverse but not significant (HR = 0.81, 95%CI 0.63–1.04, p = 0.10). Additional adjustment for details of reproductive history or waist circumference yielded minimal changes to the observed associations. Further research is required to confirm the nature of the association between gallstones and CRC by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Gallstones, colorectal cancer, EPIC, cohort
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162390 (URN)10.1002/ijc.32090 (DOI)000476557000007 ()30585640 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059850802 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Rutegård, M., Rutegård, J. & Haapamäki, M. M. (2019). Multicentre, randomised trial comparing acellular porcine collagen implant versus gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extended abdominoperineal excision of rectum: study protocol for the Nordic Extended Abdominoperineal Excision (NEAPE) study. BMJ Open, 9(5), Article ID e027255.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multicentre, randomised trial comparing acellular porcine collagen implant versus gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extended abdominoperineal excision of rectum: study protocol for the Nordic Extended Abdominoperineal Excision (NEAPE) study
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e027255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Different surgical techniques are used to cover the defect in the floor of the lesser pelvis after an ‘extralevator’ or ‘extended’ abdominoperineal excision for advanced rectal cancer. However, these operations are potentially mutilating, and the reconstruction method of the pelvic floor has been studied only sparsely. We aim to study whether a porcine-collagen implant is superior or equally beneficial to a gluteus maximus myocutaneous flap as a reconstruction method.

Methods and analysis: This is a multicentre non-blinded randomised controlled trial with the experimental arm using a porcine-collagen implant and the control arm using a gluteus maximus muscle and skin rotation flap. Considered for inclusion are patients with rectal cancer, who are operated on with a wide abdominoperineal rectal excision including most of the levator muscles and where the muscle remnants cannot be closed in the midline with sutures. Patients with a primary or recurrent rectal cancer with an estimated survival of more than a year are eligible. The randomisation is computer generated with a concealed sequence and stratified by participating hospital and preoperative radiotherapy regimen. The main outcome is physical performance 6 months after surgery measured with the timed-stands test. Secondary outcomes are perineal wound healing, surgical complications, quality of life, ability to sit and other outcomes measured at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. To be able to state experimental arm non-inferiority with a 10% margin of the primary outcome with 90% statistical power and assuming 10% attrition, we aim to enrol 85 patients from May 2011 onwards.

Ethics and dissemination: The study has been approved by the Regional Ethical Review board at Umeå University (protocol no: NEAPE-2010-335-31M). The results will be disseminated through patient associations and conventional scientific channels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161540 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027255 (DOI)000471192800261 ()31147361 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, VLL-187711Västerbotten County Council, VLL-226241
Available from: 2019-07-11 Created: 2019-07-11 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Rutegård, M., Båtsman, M., Axelsson, J., Brynolfsson, P., Brännström, F., Rutegård, J., . . . Riklund, K. (2019). PET/MRI and PET/CT hybrid imaging of rectal cancer - description and initial observations from the RECTOPET (REctal Cancer trial on PET/MRI/CT) study. Cancer Imaging, 19, Article ID 52.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PET/MRI and PET/CT hybrid imaging of rectal cancer - description and initial observations from the RECTOPET (REctal Cancer trial on PET/MRI/CT) study
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Imaging, ISSN 1740-5025, E-ISSN 1470-7330, Vol. 19, article id 52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeThe role of hybrid imaging using F-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to improve preoperative evaluation of rectal cancer is largely unknown. To investigate this, the RECTOPET (REctal Cancer Trial on PET/MRI/CT) study has been launched with the aim to assess staging and restaging of primary rectal cancer. This report presents the study workflow and the initial experiences of the impact of PET/CT on staging and management of the first patients included in the RECTOPET study.MethodsThis prospective cohort study, initiated in September 2016, is actively recruiting patients from Region Vasterbotten in Sweden. This pilot study includes patients recruited and followed up until December 2017. All patients had a biopsy-verified rectal adenocarcinoma and underwent a minimum of one preoperative FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI examination. These patients were referred to the colorectal cancer multidisciplinary team meeting at Umea University Hospital. All available data were evaluated when making management recommendations. The clinical course was noted and changes consequent to PET imaging were described; surgical specimens underwent dedicated MRI for anatomical matching between imaging and histopathology.ResultsTwenty-four patients have so far been included in the study. Four patients were deemed unresectable, while 19 patients underwent or were scheduled for surgery; one patient was enrolled in a watch-and-wait programme after restaging. Consequent to taking part in the study, two patients were upstaged to M1 disease: one patient was diagnosed with a solitary hepatic metastasis detected using PET/CT and underwent metastasectomy prior to rectal cancer surgery, while one patient with a small, but metabolically active, lung nodulus experienced no change of management. PET/MRI did not contribute to any recorded change in patient management.ConclusionsThe RECTOPET study investigating the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI for preoperative staging of primary rectal cancer patients will provide novel data that clarify the value of adding hybrid to conventional imaging, and the role of PET/CT versus PET/MRI.Trial registrationNCT03846882.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Rectal neoplasm, Rectal tumour, Staging, Lymph nodes, Tumour deposits, PET, CT, FDG-PET, CT, PET
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161991 (URN)10.1186/s40644-019-0237-1 (DOI)000477054900002 ()31337428 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Boström, P., Haapamäki, M. M., Rutegård, J., Matthiessen, P. & Rutegård, M. (2019). Population‐based cohort study of the impact on postoperative mortality of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer. BJS Open, 3(1), 106-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population‐based cohort study of the impact on postoperative mortality of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer
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2019 (English)In: BJS Open, E-ISSN 2474-9842, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Anastomotic leakage following anterior resection for rectal cancer may result in death. The aim of this study was to yield an updated, population‐based estimate of postoperative mortality and evaluate possible interacting factors.

Methods: This was a retrospective national cohort study of patients who underwent anterior resection between 2007 and 2016. Data were retrieved from a prospectively developed database. Anastomotic leakage constituted exposure, whereas outcome was defined as death within 90 days of surgery. Logistic regression analyses, using directed acyclic graphs to evaluate possible confounders, were performed, including interaction analyses.

Results: Of 6948 patients, 693 (10·0 per cent) experienced anastomotic leakage and 294 (4·2 per cent) underwent reintervention due to leakage. The mortality rate was 1·5 per cent in patients without leakage and 3·9 per cent in those with leakage. In multivariable analysis, leakage was associated with increased mortality only when a reintervention was performed (odds ratio (OR) 5·57, 95 per cent c.i. 3·29 to 9·44). Leaks not necessitating reintervention did not result in increased mortality (OR 0·70, 0·25 to 1·96). There was evidence of interaction between leakage and age on a multiplicative scale (P = 0·007), leading to a substantial mortality increase in elderly patients with leakage.

Conclusion: Anastomotic leakage, in particular severe leakage, led to a significant increase in 90‐day mortality, with a more pronounced risk of death in the elderly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154649 (URN)10.1002/bjs5.50106 (DOI)000457222900012 ()30734021 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Zheng, J., Rutegård, M., Santoni, G., Wallner, B., Johansson, I., Sund, M., . . . Lagergren, J. (2019). Prediabetes and diabetes in relation to risk of gastric adenocarcinoma. British Journal of Cancer, 120(12), 1147-1152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediabetes and diabetes in relation to risk of gastric adenocarcinoma
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 1147-1152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Whether prediabetes or diabetes increases the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma is not clear.

Methods: This cohort study included 111,198 participants in the Northern Swedish Health and Disease Study. The participants were followed up from November 1985 to April 2017. The exposure to prediabetes or diabetes was assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests and self-reports. The incidence of the outcome gastric adenocarcinoma was identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox regressions were used to analyse the associations between prediabetes or diabetes and the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, providing hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for sex, age, calendar year, body mass index, tobacco smoking and education level.

Results: Compared with normoglycaemic participants, the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma was not increased among participants with prediabetes (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.79–1.44), diabetes (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.46–1.29) or any of these exposures (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.73–1.27). No associations were identified between prediabetes or diabetes and the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in stratified analyses or in analyses separating cardia and non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma.

Conclusions: This study does not support the hypothesis that prediabetes or diabetes increases the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161450 (URN)10.1038/s41416-019-0470-1 (DOI)000470973800009 ()31061455 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR SIMSAM D0547801Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2015/460
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Cook, M. B., Barnett, M. J., Bock, C. H., Cross, A. J., Goodman, P. J., Goodman, G. E., . . . Campbell, P. T. (2019). Prediagnostic circulating markers of inflammation and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a study within the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. Gut, 68(6), 960-968
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prediagnostic circulating markers of inflammation and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a study within the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium
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2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 960-968Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Cross-sectional data indicate that systemic inflammation is important in oesophageal adenocarcinoma. We conducted a prospective study to assess whether prediagnostic circulating markers of inflammation were associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma and to what extent they mediated associations of obesity and cigarette smoking with cancer risk.

DESIGN: This nested case-control study included 296 oesophageal adenocarcinoma cases and 296 incidence density matched controls from seven prospective cohort studies. We quantitated 69 circulating inflammation markers using Luminex-based multiplex assays. Conditional logistic regression models estimated associations between inflammation markers and oesophageal adenocarcinoma, as well as direct and indirect effects of obesity and smoking on risk of malignancy.

RESULTS: Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2) (ORsquartile 4 vs 1=2.67, 95% CI 1.52 to 4.68) was significantly associated with oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Additional markers close to the adjusted significance threshold included C reactive protein, serum amyloid A, lipocalin-2, resistin, interleukin (IL) 3, IL17A, soluble IL-6 receptor and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3. Adjustment for body mass index, waist circumference or smoking status slightly attenuated biomarker-cancer associations. Mediation analysis indicated that sTNFR2 may account for 33% (p=0.005) of the effect of waist circumference on oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. Resistin, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, C reactive protein and serum amyloid A were also identified as potential mediators of obesity-oesophageal adenocarcinoma associations. For smoking status, only plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 was a nominally statistically significant (p<0.05) mediator of cancer risk.

CONCLUSION: This prospective study provides evidence of a link between systemic inflammation and oesophageal adenocarcinoma risk. In addition, this study provides the first evidence that indirect effects of excess adiposity and cigarette smoking, via systemic inflammation, increase the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
cancer epidemiology, inflammation, inflammatory mediators, oesophageal cancer
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154640 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316678 (DOI)000471832900004 ()30121626 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052475373 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Murphy, N., Achaintre, D., Zamora-Ros, R., Jenab, M., Boutron-Ruault, M.-C., Carbonnel, F., . . . Scalbert, A. (2018). A prospective evaluation of plasma polyphenol levels and colon cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 143(7), 1620-1631
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prospective evaluation of plasma polyphenol levels and colon cancer risk
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 7, p. 1620-1631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polyphenols have been shown to exert biological activity in experimental models of colon cancer; however, human data linking specific polyphenols to colon cancer is limited. We assessed the relationship between pre-diagnostic plasma polyphenols and colon cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Using high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, we measured concentrations of 35 polyphenols in plasma from 809 incident colon cancer cases and 809 matched controls. We used multivariable adjusted conditional logistic regression models that included established colon cancer risk factors. The false discovery rate (qvalues ) was computed to control for multiple comparisons. All statistical tests were two-sided. After false discovery rate correction and in continuous log2 -transformed multivariable models, equol (odds ratio [OR] per log2 -value, 0.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.79-0.93; qvalue  = 0.01) and homovanillic acid (OR per log2 -value, 1.46, 95% CI = 1.16-1.84; qvalue  = 0.02) were associated with colon cancer risk. Comparing extreme fifths, equol concentrations were inversely associated with colon cancer risk (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.41-0.91, ptrend  = 0.003), while homovanillic acid concentrations were positively associated with colon cancer development (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.17-2.53, ptrend  < 0.0001). No heterogeneity for these associations was observed by sex and across other colon cancer risk factors. The remaining polyphenols were not associated with colon cancer risk. Higher equol concentrations were associated with lower risk, and higher homovanillic acid concentrations were associated with greater risk of colon cancer. These findings support a potential role for specific polyphenols in colon tumorigenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
EPIC, biomarkers, colon cancer, nested case-control study, polyphenols
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151155 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31563 (DOI)000443392100008 ()29696648 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Holmgren, K., Haapamäki, M. M., Matthiessen, P., Rutegård, J. & Rutegård, M. (2018). Anterior resection for rectal cancer in Sweden: validation of a registry-based method to determine long-term stoma outcome. Acta Oncologica, 57(12), 1631-1638
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anterior resection for rectal cancer in Sweden: validation of a registry-based method to determine long-term stoma outcome
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2018 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 1631-1638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A permanent stoma after anterior resection for rectal cancer is common. Nationwide registries provide sufficient power to evaluate factors influencing this phenomenon, but validation is required to ensure the quality of registry-based stoma outcomes.

Methods: Patients who underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer in the Northern healthcare region of Sweden between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013 were reviewed by medical records and followed until 31 December 2014 with regard to stoma outcome. A registry-based method to determine nationwide long-term stoma outcomes, using data from the National Patient Registry and the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry, was developed and internally validated using the chart reviewed reference cohort. Accuracy was evaluated with positive and negative predictive values and Kappa values. Following validation, the stoma outcome in all patients treated with an anterior resection for rectal cancer in Sweden during the study period was estimated. Possible regional differences in determined stoma outcomes between the six Swedish healthcare regions were subsequently evaluated with the χ2 test.

Results: With 312 chart reviewed patients as reference, stoma outcome was accurately predicted through the registry-based method in 299 cases (95.8%), with a positive predictive value of 85.1% (95% CI 75.8%-91.8%), and a negative predictive value of 100.0% (95% CI 98.4%-100.0%), while the Kappa value was 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.95). In Sweden, 4768 patients underwent anterior resection during the study period, of which 942 (19.8%) were determined to have a permanent stoma. The stoma rate varied regionally between 17.8-29.2%, to a statistically significant degree (p = .001).

Conclusion: Using data from two national registries to determine long-term stoma outcome after anterior resection for rectal cancer proved to be reliable in comparison to chart review. Permanent stoma prevalence after such surgery remains at a significant level, while stoma outcomes vary substantially between different healthcare regions in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152765 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2018.1521988 (DOI)30306825 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054883319 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-22 Created: 2018-10-22 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Rutegård, M., Gümüsçü, R., Stylianidis, G., Nordin, P., Nilsson, E. & Haapamäki, M. M. (2018). Chronic pain, discomfort, quality of life and impact on sex life after open inguinal hernia mesh repair: an expertise-based randomized clinical trial comparing lightweight and heavyweight mesh. Hernia, 22(3), 411-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic pain, discomfort, quality of life and impact on sex life after open inguinal hernia mesh repair: an expertise-based randomized clinical trial comparing lightweight and heavyweight mesh
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2018 (English)In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 411-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: There is a paucity of high-quality evidence concerning mesh choice in open inguinal hernia repair. Using an expertise-based randomized clinical trial design, we aimed to evaluate the postoperative impact of two different mesh types on pain and discomfort, quality of life and sex life.

METHODS: , ULTRAPRO™, Ethicon). Follow-up data were collected by questionnaires and outpatient visits in the range of 1-3 years after surgery.

RESULTS: Some 412 patients were randomized and 363 patients were analysed. There was no difference in pain between groups after surgery but a statistically significant difference concerning awareness of a groin lump and groin discomfort, favouring the lightweight group 1 year after surgery. No differences in quality of life between groups could be detected but both groups had a substantially better quality of life postoperatively, as compared to before surgery. In the analysis of impact on sex life, no differences between mesh groups were found.

CONCLUSION: The Lichtenstein operation performed for primary inguinal hernia improves quality of life for most of the male patients, independently of the type of mesh used. The lightweight mesh group experienced less awareness of a groin lump and groin discomfort 1 year postoperatively. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00451893.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Groin hernia repair, Lichtenstein operation, Patient-reported outcome measures
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146882 (URN)10.1007/s10029-018-1734-z (DOI)000432794700005 ()29353339 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0974-6373

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