umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
van Guelpen, BethanyORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9692-101x
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 74) Show all publications
Huyghe, J. R., Bien, S. A., Harrison, T. A., Kang, H. M., Chen, S., Schmit, S. L., . . . Peters, U. (2019). Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer. Nature Genetics, 51(1), 76-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 76-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Medical Genetics Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155208 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0286-6 (DOI)000454108800015 ()30510241 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Van Hemelrijck, M., Ulmer, H., Nagel, G., Peter, R. S., Fritz, J., Myte, R., . . . Stocks, T. (2018). Longitudinal study of body mass index, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension in 60,000 men and women in Sweden and Austria. PLoS ONE, 13(6), Article ID e0197830.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal study of body mass index, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension in 60,000 men and women in Sweden and Austria
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0197830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Obesity is suggested to underlie development of other metabolic aberrations, but longitudinal relationships between metabolic factors at various ages has not been studied in detail. Methods: Data from 27,379 men and 32,275 women with in total 122,940 health examinations in the Västerbotten Intervention Project, Sweden and the Vorarlberg Health Monitoring and Prevention Programme, Austria were used to investigate body mass index (BMI), mid-blood pressure, and fasting levels of glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol at baseline in relation to 10-year changes of these factors and weight. We included paired examinations performed 10 +/- 2 years apart and used them for longitudinal analysis with linear regression of changes between the ages 30 and 40, 40 and 50, or 50 and 60 years. Results: Higher levels of BMI were associated with increases in glucose and mid-blood pressure as well as triglycerides levels, and, to a lesser extent, decreases in cholesterol levels. For instance, per 5 kg/m(2) higher BMI at age 40, glucose at age 50 increased by 0.24 mmol/l (95%Cl:0.22-0.26) and mid-blood pressure increased by 1.54 mm Hg (95%Cl: 1.35-1.74). The strongest association observed was between BMI at age 30 and mid-blood pressure, which was 2.12 mm Hg (95% CI: 1.79-2.45) increase over ten years per 5 kg/m(2) higher BMI level. This association was observed at an age when blood pressure levels on average remained stable. Other associations than those with BMI at baseline were much weaker. However, triglyceride levels were associated with future glucose changes among individuals with elevated BMI, particularly in the two older age groups. Conclusion: BMI was most indicative of long-term changes in metabolic factors, and the strongest impact was observed for increases in blood pressure between 30 and 40 years of age. Our study supports that lifestyle interventions preventing metabolic aberrations should focus on avoiding weight increases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150785 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0197830 (DOI)000435090700031 ()29897925 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Myte, R., Gylling, B., Häggström, J., Schneede, J., Löfgren-Burström, A., Huyghe, J. R., . . . Van Guelpen, B. (2018). One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status. PLoS ONE, 13(4), Article ID e0196233.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0196233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, intracellular reactions involved in nucleotide synthesis and methylation, likely increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, results have been inconsistent. To explore whether this inconsistency could be explained by intertumoral heterogeneity, we evaluated a comprehensive panel of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to the risk of molecular subtypes of CRC defined by mutations in the KRAS and BRAF oncogenes. This nested case-control study included 488 CRC cases and 947 matched controls from two population-based cohorts in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We analyzed 14 biomarkers and 17 SNPs in prediagnostic blood and determined KRAS and BRAF mutation status in tumor tissue. In a multivariate network analysis, no variable displayed a strong association with the risk of specific CRC subtypes. A non-synonymous SNP in the CTH gene, rs1021737, had a stronger association compared with other variables. In subsequent univariate analyses, participants with variant rs1021737 genotype had a decreased risk of KRAS-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.50, 1.05), and an increased risk of BRAF-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.30), with weak evidence for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.01). This subtype-specific SNP association was not replicated in a case-case analysis of 533 CRC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (P = 0.85). In conclusion, we found no support for clear subtype-specific roles of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and SNPs in CRC development, making differences in CRC molecular subtype distributions an unlikely explanation for the varying results on the role of one-carbon metabolism in CRC development across previous studies. Further investigation of the CTH gene in colorectal carcinogenesis with regards to KRAS and BRAF mutations or other molecular characteristics of the tumor may be warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147822 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0196233 (DOI)000430802400077 ()29694444 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Gylling, B., Myte, R., Ulvik, A., Ueland, P. M., Midttun, Ø., Schneede, J., . . . Palmqvist, R. (2018). One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, , p. 68Article in journal (Other academic) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: One-carbon metabolism biomarker are easily measured in plasma, but analyzing them one at a time in relation to disease does not take into account the interdependence of the many factors involved. The relative dynamics of major one-carbon metabolism branches can be assessed by relating the functional B-vitamin marker total homocysteine (tHcy) to transsulfuration (total cysteine) and methylation (creatinine) outputs.

Objective: We validated the ratios of tHcy to total cysteine (Hcy:Cys), tHcy to creatinine (Hcy:Cre), and tHcy to cysteine to creatinine (Hcy:Cys:Cre) as functional markers of B-vitamin status. We also calculated the associations of these ratios to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

Design: The relative contribution of potential confounders to the variance of the ratio-based B-vitamin markers was calculated by linear regression in a nested case-control study of 613 CRC cases and 1211 matched controls. Total B-vitamin status was represented by a summary score comprising Z-standardized plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin, betaine, pyridoxal 5´-phosphate, and riboflavin. Associations with CRC risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

Results: The ratio-based B-vitamin markers all outperformed tHcy as markers of total B-vitamin status, in both CRC cases and controls. Associations with CRC risk were similar for the ratio-based B-vitamin markers and total B-vitamin status (approximately 25% lower risk for high versus low B-vitamin status).

Conclusions: Ratio-based B-vitamin markers were good predictors of total B-vitamin status, and displayed similar associations with CRC risk. Since tHcy and creatinine are routinely clinically analyzed, Hcy:Cre could be easily implemented in clinical practice to aid interpretation of tHcy results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018. p. 68
Keywords
Biomarkers, colorectal cancer, metabolite ratios, B-vitamins, one-carbon metabolism
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Cancer Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142854 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31606 (DOI)29786139 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 12/501Swedish Cancer Society, 14/780
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form

Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2019-01-18
Sundkvist, A., Myte, R., Palmqvist, R., Harlid, S. & van Guelpen, B. (2018). Plasma ghrelin is probably not a useful biomarker for risk prediction or early detection of colorectal cancer [Letter to the editor]. Gut
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma ghrelin is probably not a useful biomarker for risk prediction or early detection of colorectal cancer
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Keywords
cancer, colorectal cancer, epidemiology, gastrointestinal hormones
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146376 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316110 (DOI)29491131 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-08-10
Wikberg, M. L., Myte, R., Palmqvist, R., van Guelpen, B. & Ljuslinder, I. (2018). Plasma miRNA can detect colorectal cancer, but how early?. Cancer Medicine, 7(5), 1697-1705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma miRNA can detect colorectal cancer, but how early?
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 1697-1705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of deaths worldwide but has a good prognosis if detected early. The need for efficient, preferable non‐ or minimally invasive, inexpensive screening tools is therefore critical. We analyzed 12 miRNAs in pre‐ and postdiagnostic plasma samples to evaluate their potential as CRC screening markers. We used a unique study design with two overlapping cohorts, allowing analysis of pre‐ and postdiagnostic samples from 58 patients with CRC and matched healthy controls. Plasma concentrations of miR‐15b, ‐16, ‐18a, ‐19a, 21, ‐22, ‐25, ‐26a, ‐29c, ‐142‐5p, ‐150, and ‐192 were measured by semi‐quantitative real‐time PCR. Concentrations of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 in plasma from patients with CRC were significantly altered compared to healthy controls. Combined as a multimarker panel, they detected CRC with an AUC of 0.93. Furthermore, levels of these three miRNAs also showed different levels in the prediagnostic case samples close to diagnosis. Only miR‐21‐levels were elevated several years before diagnosis. Plasma levels of miR‐18a, ‐21, ‐22, and ‐25 show promise as screening biomarkers for CRC. However, based on our unique analysis of prediagnostic and postdiagnostic samples from the same patients, we conclude that circulating miRNAs elevated at diagnosis may not automatically be suitable for CRC screening, if the increase occurs too close to clinical diagnosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Colorectal cancer, early detection, plasma miRNA
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146758 (URN)10.1002/cam4.1398 (DOI)000431972900011 ()29573205 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044281770 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Sundkvist, A., Myte, R., Bodén, S., Enroth, S., Gyllensten, U., Harlid, S. & van Guelpen, B. (2018). Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff. Scientific Reports, 8(1), Article ID 2320.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2320Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lifestyle behaviors are believed to influence the body's inflammatory state. Chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to the development of major non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inflammation may thus be an important link between lifestyle and disease. We evaluated self-reported physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption in relation to plasma levels of 160 validated inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. The study included 138 participants from a population-based cohort, all with repeated sampling of plasma and data ten years apart, allowing consideration of both intra- and inter-individual variation. Of 17 relationships identified, the strongest was an independent, positive association between cornulin (CRNN) and Swedish moist snuff (snus) use. We replicated the finding in a second cohort of 501 individuals, in which a dose-response relationship was also observed. Snus explained approximately one fifth of the variance in CRNN levels in both sample sets (18% and 23%). In conclusion, we identified a novel, independent, dose-dependent association between CRNN and snus use. Further study is warranted, to evaluate the performance of CRNN as a potential snus biomarker. The putative importance of lifestyle behaviors on a wide range of protein biomarkers illustrates the need for more personalized biomarker cut-offs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145046 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-20794-3 (DOI)29396534 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bodén, S., Wennberg, M., Van Guelpen, B., Johansson, I., Lindahl, B., Andersson, J., . . . Nilsson, L. M. (2017). Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction: a prospective population-based study. Nutrition Journal, 16, Article ID 21.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction: a prospective population-based study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 16, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chronic, low-grade inflammation is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The inflammatory impact of diet can be reflected by concentrations of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and the inflammatory potential of diet can be estimated by the dietary inflammatory index (DII(TM)), which has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk in some previous studies. We aimed to examine the association between the DII and the risk of first myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based study with long follow-up.

METHOD: We conducted a prospective case-control study of 1389 verified cases of first MI and 5555 matched controls nested within the population-based cohorts of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), of which the largest is the ongoing Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) with nearly 100 000 participants during the study period. Median follow-up from recruitment to MI diagnosis was 6.4 years (6.2 for men and 7.2 for women). DII scores were derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered in 1986-2006. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using quartile 1 (most anti-inflammatory diet) as the reference category. For validation, general linear models were used to estimate the association between the DII scores and two inflammatory markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in a subset (n = 605) of the study population.

RESULTS: Male participants with the most pro-inflammatory DII scores had an increased risk of MI [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.57 (95% CI 1.21-2.02) P trend = 0.02], which was essentially unchanged after adjustment for potential confounders, including cardiovascular risk factors [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.50 (95% CI 1.14-1.99), P trend = 0.10]. No association was found between DII and MI in women. An increase of one DII score unit was associated with 9% higher hsCRP (95% CI 0.03-0.14) and 6% higher IL-6 (95% CI 0.02-0.11) in 605 controls with biomarker data available.

CONCLUSION: A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with an elevated risk of first myocardial infarction in men; whereas for women the relationship was null. Consideration of the inflammatory impact of diet could improve prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Keywords
DII Dietary inflammatory index, MI Myocardial infarction, NSHDS Northern Sweden health and disease study, VIP Vasterbotten intervention programme, MONICA Monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease, CVD cardiovascular disease, hsCRP high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, IL-6 interleukin 6
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133833 (URN)10.1186/s12937-017-0243-8 (DOI)000398222800001 ()28376792 (PubMedID)
Note

Publicerad som open source med stöd från Arcums strategiska medel.

Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nimptsch, K., Song, M., Aleksandrova, K., Katsoulis, M., Freisling, H., Jenab, M., . . . Pischon, T. (2017). Genetic variation in the ADIPOQ gene, adiponectin concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer: a Mendelian Randomization analysis using data from three large cohort studies. European Journal of Epidemiology, 32(5), 419-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic variation in the ADIPOQ gene, adiponectin concentrations and risk of colorectal cancer: a Mendelian Randomization analysis using data from three large cohort studies
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Higher levels of circulating adiponectin have been related to lower risk of colorectal cancer in several prospective cohort studies, but it remains unclear whether this association may be causal. We aimed to improve causal inference in a Mendelian Randomization meta-analysis using nested case-control studies of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, 623 cases, 623 matched controls), the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, 231 cases, 230 controls) and the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, 399 cases, 774 controls) with available data on pre-diagnostic adiponectin concentrations and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ADIPOQ gene. We created an ADIPOQ allele score that explained approximately 3% of the interindividual variation in adiponectin concentrations. The ADIPOQ allele score was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer in logistic regression analyses (pooled OR per score-unit unit 0.97, 95% CI 0.91, 1.04). Genetically determined twofold higher adiponectin was not significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer using the ADIPOQ allele score as instrumental variable (pooled OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.40, 1.34). In a summary instrumental variable analysis (based on previously published data) with higher statistical power, no association between genetically determined twofold higher adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer was observed (0.99, 95% CI 0.93, 1.06 in women and 0.94, 95% CI 0.88, 1.01 in men). Thus, our study does not support a causal effect of circulating adiponectin on colorectal cancer risk. Due to the limited genetic determination of adiponectin, larger Mendelian Randomization studies are necessary to clarify whether adiponectin is causally related to lower risk of colorectal cancer.

Keywords
Adiponectin, ADIPOQ, Colorectal cancer, Mendelian Randomization
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137987 (URN)10.1007/s10654-017-0262-y (DOI)000405184200008 ()
Available from: 2017-08-01 Created: 2017-08-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Aleksandrova, K., Jenab, M., Leitzmann, M., Bueno-de-Mesquita, B., Kaaks, R., Trichopoulou, A., . . . Boeing, H. (2017). Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort. International Journal of Epidemiology, 46(6), 1823-1835
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort
Show others...
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1823-1835Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for the association between physical activity and colon cancer. We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort of 519 978 men and women aged 25 to 70 years followed from 1992 to 2003. A total of 713 incident colon cancer cases were matched, using risk-set sampling, to 713 controls on age, sex, study centre, fasting status and hormonal therapy use. The amount of total physical activity during the past year was expressed in metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-h/week. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at study baseline. High physical activity was associated with a lower risk of colon cancer: relative risk a parts per thousand<yen>91 MET-h/week vs < 91 MET-h/week = 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57 to 0.96]. In mediation analyses, this association was accounted for by waist circumference: proportion explained effect (PEE) = 17%; CI: 4% to 52%; and the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R): PEE = 15%; 95% CI: 1% to 50% and 5-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D): PEE = 30%; 95% CI: 12% to 88%. In combination, these factors explained 45% (95% CI: 20% to 125%) of the association. Beyond waist circumference, sOB-R and 25[OH]D additionally explained 10% (95% CI: 1%; 56%) and 23% (95% CI: 6%; 111%) of the association, respectively. Promoting physical activity, particularly outdoors, and maintaining metabolic health and adequate vitamin D levels could represent a promising strategy for colon cancer prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
Physical activity, colon cancer, mediating factors, adiposity, biomarkers
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143557 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyx174 (DOI)000417745100027 ()29025032 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9692-101x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications