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BETA
van Guelpen, BethanyORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9692-101x
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Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Shirdel, M., Anderson, F., Myte, R., Axelsson, J., Rutegård, M., Blomqvist, L., . . . Gylling, B. (2020). Body composition measured by computed tomography is associated with colorectal cancer survival, also in early-stage disease. Acta Oncologica
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body composition measured by computed tomography is associated with colorectal cancer survival, also in early-stage disease
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2020 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Cachexia and sarcopenia are associated with poor survival after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to measure aspects of cachexia including sarcopenia, myosteatosis and the amount of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to relate CT-based body composition variables with survival outcomes in CRC. Material and methods: In this population-based, retrospective cohort study, CT scans of 974 patients with pathological stages I-IV CRCs, collected at or very near diagnosis (years 2000-2016), were used to measure cross-sectional fat and muscle tissue areas. Body composition variables based on these measurements were assessed in relation to tumor stage and site and cancer-specific survival in stages I-III CRC (n = 728) using Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier estimators. Results: Sarcopenia was associated with decreased cancer-specific survival, especially in patients with stages I-II tumors. The hazard ratio (HR) for the lowest versus highest tertile of skeletal muscle index (SMI) was 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-2.58 for all stages, and HR 2.22; 95% CI 1.06-4.68, for stages I-II. Myosteatosis was also associated with decreased cancer-specific survival [(HR 2.03; 95% CI 1.20-3.34 for the lowest versus the highest tertile of skeletal muscle radiodensity (SMR)]. SMI and SMR were lower in patients with right-sided CRC, independent of age and sex. No adipose tissue measurement was significantly associated with cancer-specific survival. Conclusion: In concordance with previous studies, sarcopenia and myosteatosis were associated with decreased cancer-specific survival. The strong association between sarcopenia and poor cancer-specific survival in early-stage disease could have clinical implications for personalizing therapy decisions, including nutritional support.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169844 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2020.1744716 (DOI)000523671400001 ()32228271 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-05-26 Created: 2020-05-26 Last updated: 2020-05-26
Aglago, E. K., Huybrechts, I., Murphy, N., Casagrande, C., Nicolas, G., Pischon, T., . . . Gunter, M. J. (2020). Consumption of Fish and Long-chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large European Cohort. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 654-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of Fish and Long-chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer in a Large European Cohort
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2020 (English)In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, p. 654-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is an unclear association between intake of fish and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs) and colorectal cancer (CRC). We examined the association between fish consumption, dietary and circulating levels of n-3 LC-PUFAs, and ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA with CRC using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

METHODS: Dietary intake of fish (total, fatty/oily, lean/white) and n-3 LC-PUFA were estimated by food frequency questionnaires given to 521,324 participants in the EPIC study; among these, 6291 individuals developed CRC (median follow up, 14.9 years). Levels of phospholipid LC-PUFA were measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples from a sub-group of 461 CRC cases and 461 matched individuals without CRC (controls). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and odds ratios (ORs), respectively, with 95% CIs.

RESULTS: Total intake of fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; Ptrend = .005), fatty fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82-0.98; Ptrend = .009), and lean fish (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.83-1.00; Ptrend = .016) were inversely associated with CRC incidence. Intake of total n-3 LC-PUFA (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95; Ptrend = .010) was also associated with reduced risk of CRC, whereas dietary ratio of n-6:n-3 LC-PUFA was associated with increased risk of CRC (HR for quintile 5 vs 1, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.18-1.45; Ptrend < .001). Plasma levels of phospholipid n-3 LC-PUFA was not associated with overall CRC risk, but an inverse trend was observed for proximal compared with distal colon cancer (Pheterogeneity = .026).

CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of dietary patterns of participants in the EPIC study, we found regular consumption of fish, at recommended levels, to be associated with a lower risk of CRC, possibly through exposure to n-3 LC-PUFA. Levels of n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma were not associated with CRC risk, but there may be differences in risk at different regions of the colon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Epidemiologic, Omega 3, Seafood, Tumorigenesis
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162704 (URN)10.1016/j.cgh.2019.06.031 (DOI)000514653800027 ()31252190 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2020-04-03Bibliographically approved
Lu, Y., Kweon, S.-S., Cai, Q., Tanikawa, C., Shu, X.-O., Jia, W.-H., . . . Zheng, W. (2020). Identification of Novel Loci and New Risk Variant in Known Loci for Colorectal Cancer Risk in East Asians. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 29(2), 477-486
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of Novel Loci and New Risk Variant in Known Loci for Colorectal Cancer Risk in East Asians
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2020 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 477-486Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Risk variants identified so far for colorectal cancer explain only a small proportion of milial risk of this cancer, particularly in Asians.

Methods: We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of colorectal cancer in East Asians, cluding 23,572 colorectal cancer cases and 48,700 controls. To identify novel risk loci, we selected 60 omising risk variants for replication using data from 58,131 colorectal cancer cases and 67,347 controls European descent. To identify additional risk variants in known colorectal cancer loci, we performed nditional analyses in East Asians.

Results: An indel variant, rs67052019 at 1p13.3, was found to be associated with colorectal cancer risk P = 3.9 x 10(-8) in Asians (OR per allele deletion = 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 1.08-1.18). This sociation was replicated in European descendants using a variant (rs2938616) in complete linkage sequilibrium with rs67052019 (P = 7.7 x 10(-3)). Of the remaining 59 variants, 12 showed an association P < 0.05 in the European-ancestry study, including rs11108175 and rs9634162 at P < 5 x 10(-8) and o variants with an association near the genome-wide significance level (rs60911071, P = 5.8 x 10(-8); 62558833, P = 7.5 x 10(-8)) in the combined analyses of Asian- and European-ancestry data. In addition, ing data from East Asians, we identified 13 new risk variants at 11 loci reported from previous GWAS.

Conclusions: In this large GWAS, we identified three novel risk loci and two highly suggestive loci for lorectal cancer risk and provided evidence for potential roles of multiple genes and pathways in the iology of colorectal cancer. In addition, we showed that additional risk variants exist in many colorectal ncer risk loci identified previously.

Impact: Our study provides novel data to improve the understanding of the genetic basis for colorectal ncer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2020
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169792 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0755 (DOI)000521285500025 ()31826910 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-04-21 Created: 2020-04-21 Last updated: 2020-04-21Bibliographically approved
Shi, L., Brunius, C., Johansson, I., Bergdahl, I., Rolandsson, O., van Guelpen, B., . . . Landberg, R. (2020). Plasma metabolite biomarkers of boiled and filtered coffee intake and their association with type 2 diabetes risk. Journal of Internal Medicine, 287(4), 405-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma metabolite biomarkers of boiled and filtered coffee intake and their association with type 2 diabetes risk
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 287, no 4, p. 405-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Habitual coffee intake has been associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), but few studies used biomarkers to reflect intake and investigated different coffee brews, that is boiled and filtered, separately.

OBJECTIVES: To identify plasma metabolites associated with boiled or filtered coffee intake and to examine their association with T2D risk in Swedish adults.

METHODS: In a case-control study nested within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, baseline plasma samples from 421 case-control pairs and samples from a subset of 149 pairs at a 10-year follow-up were analysed using untargeted LC-MS metabolomics. We identified metabolites associated with food frequency questionnaires (FFQ)-estimated coffee intake and assessed odds ratios of T2D.

RESULTS: In total, 24 and 32 metabolites were associated with boiled or filtered coffee intake. We determined robust metabolite panels for highly specific prediction of boiled or filtered coffee. We observed an inverse association between the metabolite panel of filtered coffee and T2D risk. No association with T2D was observed for the panel of boiled coffee intake. Similar results were observed for FFQ-estimated coffee intake.

CONCLUSIONS: We identified plasma metabolites specifically associated with boiled or filtered coffee intake, which might be used as selective biomarkers. Our study supports a protective role of habitual intake of filtered coffee on T2D development. The lack of association for boiled coffee intake might be due to the lack of a protective effect of boiled coffee or due to the limited number of boiled coffee consumers in this population, but it warrants further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2020
Keywords
coffee intake, dietary biomarker, epidemiology, metabolomics, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168737 (URN)10.1111/joim.13009 (DOI)000520939100005 ()31814205 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076417494 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-05-14Bibliographically approved
Butt, J., Jenab, M., Pawlita, M., Overvad, K., Tjonneland, A., Olsen, A., . . . Hughes, D. J. (2019). Antibody Responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum Proteins in Prediagnostic Blood Samples are not Associated with Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 28(9), 1552-1555
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibody Responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum Proteins in Prediagnostic Blood Samples are not Associated with Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1552-1555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a lack of prospective data on the potential association of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and colorectal cancer risk. In this study, we assessed whether antibody responses to F. nucleatum are associated with colorectal cancer risk in prediagnostic serum samples in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) cohort.

Methods: We applied a multiplex serology assay to simultaneously measure antibody responses to 11 F. nucleatum antigens in prediagnostic serum samples from 485 colorectal cancer cases and 485 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: We observed neither a statistically significant colorectal cancer risk association for antibodies to individual F. nucleatum proteins nor for combined positivity to any of the 11 proteins (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.62–1.06).

Conclusions: Antibody responses to F. nucleatum proteins in prediagnostic serum samples from a subset of colorectal cancer cases and matched controls within the EPIC study were not associated with colorectal cancer risk.

Impact: Our findings in prospectively ascertained serum samples contradict the existing literature on the association of F. nucleatum with colorectal cancer risk. Future prospective studies, specifically detecting F. nucleatum in stool or tissue biopsies, are needed to complement our findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167011 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0313 (DOI)000498660400017 ()31481495 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Mullee, A., Romaguera, D., Pearson-Stuttard, J., Viallon, V., Stepien, M., Freisling, H., . . . Murphy, N. (2019). Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries. JAMA Internal Medicine (11), 1479-1490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries
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2019 (English)In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, no 11, p. 1479-1490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Soft drinks are frequently consumed, but whether this consumption is associated with mortality risk is unknown and has been understudied in European populations to date.

Objective: To examine the association between total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption and subsequent total and cause-specific mortality.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study involved participants (n = 451 743 of the full cohort) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), an ongoing, large multinational cohort of people from 10 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), with participants recruited between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2000. Excluded participants were those who reported cancer, heart disease, stroke, or diabetes at baseline; those with implausible dietary intake data; and those with missing soft drink consumption or follow-up information. Data analyses were performed from February 1, 2018, to October 1, 2018.

Exposure: Consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Total mortality and cause-specific mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for other mortality risk factors.

Results: In total, 521 330 individuals were enrolled. Of this total, 451 743 (86.7%) were included in the study, with a mean (SD) age of 50.8 (9.8) years and with 321 081 women (71.1%). During a mean (range) follow-up of 16.4 (11.1 in Greece to 19.2 in France) years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Higher all-cause mortality was found among participants who consumed 2 or more glasses per day (vs consumers of <1 glass per month) of total soft drinks (hazard ratio [HR], 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22; P < .001), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = .004), and artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.35; P < .001). Positive associations were also observed between artificially sweetened soft drinks and deaths from circulatory diseases (≥2 glasses per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.30-1.78; P < .001) and between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and deaths from digestive diseases (≥1 glass per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.05; P < .001).

Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks was positively associated with all-cause deaths in this large European cohort; the results are supportive of public health campaigns aimed at limiting the consumption of soft drinks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2019
National Category
Dentistry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164265 (URN)10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2478 (DOI)000503214700008 ()31479109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071732581 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForskSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-10-19 Created: 2019-10-19 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Myte, R., Sundkvist, A., van Guelpen, B. & Harlid, S. (2019). Circulating levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation, an analysis of repeated samples from a population based cohort. Epigenetics, 14(7), 649-659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation, an analysis of repeated samples from a population based cohort
2019 (English)In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 649-659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

DNA methylation in blood may adapt to conditions affecting our health, such as inflammation, and multiple studies have identified differential DNA methylation related to smoking, obesity and various diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate previously reported, and explore possible new, associations between levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation in blood. We used a well-characterized study population consisting of 127 individuals, all of whom were participants in the population-based Vasterbotten Intervention Programme cohort and had provided two blood samples, ten years apart. Levels of CRP and 160 other proteins were measured in plasma, and DNA methylation levels (assessed using the 850K Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip) were measured in white blood cell DNA. Associations between CpG methylation and protein levels were estimated using linear mixed models. In the study we were able to confirm the direction for 85 of 102 previously reported protein-methylation associations. Depicting associations in a network allowed us to identify CpG sites with associations to multiple proteins, and ten CpG sites were each associated with three or more inflammatory markers. Furthermore, two genetic regions included nine additional unreported CpG sites that may represent trans-acting methylation sites. Our study supports a complex interaction between DNA methylation and circulating proteins involved in the inflammatory response. The notion of trans-acting methylation sites affecting, or being affected by, the expression of genes on completely different chromosomes should be taken into account when interpreting results from epigenome-wide association studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
DNA methylation, inflammation, biomarkers, C, reactive protein, colorectal cancer, risk factors, epigenetics, proteomics
National Category
Medical Genetics Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160622 (URN)10.1080/15592294.2019.1603962 (DOI)000470485500001 ()31033411 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, VLL-547711Västerbotten County Council, VLL-680921Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Smith, T., Muller, D. C., Moons, K. G. M., Cross, A. J., Johansson, M., Ferrari, P., . . . Tzoulaki, I. (2019). Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies. Gut, 68, 672-683
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of prognostic models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer in asymptomatic individuals: a systematic literature review and external validation in the EPIC and UK Biobank prospective cohort studies
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2019 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, p. 672-683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To systematically identify and validate published colorectal cancer risk prediction models that do not require invasive testing in two large population-based prospective cohorts.

DESIGN: Models were identified through an update of a published systematic review and validated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the UK Biobank. The performance of the models to predict the occurrence of colorectal cancer within 5 or 10 years after study enrolment was assessed by discrimination (C-statistic) and calibration (plots of observed vs predicted probability).

RESULTS: The systematic review and its update identified 16 models from 8 publications (8 colorectal, 5 colon and 3 rectal). The number of participants included in each model validation ranged from 41 587 to 396 515, and the number of cases ranged from 115 to 1781. Eligible and ineligible participants across the models were largely comparable. Calibration of the models, where assessable, was very good and further improved by recalibration. The C-statistics of the models were largely similar between validation cohorts with the highest values achieved being 0.70 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.72) in the UK Biobank and 0.71 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.74) in EPIC.

CONCLUSION: Several of these non-invasive models exhibited good calibration and discrimination within both external validation populations and are therefore potentially suitable candidates for the facilitation of risk stratification in population-based colorectal screening programmes. Future work should both evaluate this potential, through modelling and impact studies, and ascertain if further enhancement in their performance can be obtained.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
cancer prevention, colorectal cancer, colorectal cancer screening, epidemiology, medical statistics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146375 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2017-315730 (DOI)000471830300013 ()29615487 (PubMedID)
Funder
NordForskSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. M., Winkvist, A., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P., van Guelpen, B. & Johansson, I. (2019). Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population. Nutrition and Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cheese, fermented milk, cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161682 (URN)10.1080/01635581.2019.1637441 (DOI)000476072800001 ()31298944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068900342 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-08-12
Huyghe, J. R., Bien, S. A., Harrison, T. A., Kang, H. M., Chen, S., Schmit, S. L., . . . Peters, U. (2019). Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer. Nature Genetics, 51(1), 76-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer
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2019 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 76-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 x 10(-8), bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to similar to 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Kruppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Medical Genetics Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155208 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0286-6 (DOI)000454108800015 ()30510241 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9692-101x

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