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Albrectsen, Benedicte RiberORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9337-4540
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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Albrectsen, B. R., Siddique, A. B., Decker, V. H., Unterseher, M. & Robinson, K. M. (2018). Both plant genotype and herbivory shape aspen endophyte communities. Oecologia, 187(2), 535-545
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both plant genotype and herbivory shape aspen endophyte communities
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2018 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 187, no 2, p. 535-545Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Salicinoid phenolic glycosides are common defence substances in salicaceous trees and specialist leaf beetles use these compounds for their own defence against predators. Salicinoids vary qualitatively and qualitatively in aspen (Populus tremula) and this variation has a genetic basis. The foliar endophyte mycobiome is plentiful and we hypothesised that it is related to plant genotype, potentially mediated by salicinoid composition, and that interactions with the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula may alter this relationship. We studied these three-way interactions in controlled greenhouse experiments. Endophytic fungi were isolated from sterilised leaf tissues with and without beetle damage, and from beetles. We confirmed that endophyte composition was influenced by host genotype. Beetle activity added generalist morphs to the mycobiome that overrode the initial host association. Yeast-like genera (Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula) were isolated only from beetle-damaged tissues and from beetles, whereas fast-growing filamentous fungi dominated beetle-free control plants. Competition experiments between filamentous fungi of plant origin and beetle-related yeasts suggested interaction of both stimulating and inhibiting modes of action amongst the fungi. As a result, we detected examples of amensalism, commensalism, parasitism and competition between the morphs tested, but we found no evidence of mutualism, and consequently no co-evolutionary relationship could be demonstrated, between yeasts carried by beetles, host genotype and associated filamentous morphs. Endophyte studies are method-dependent and high-throughput sequencing technology best define the fungal mycobiome, culturing however continues to be a cheap way to provide fundamental ecological insights and it is also required for experimental studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Herbivory, Arboreal endophytes, Salicinoid, Bipartite graphics, Competition
National Category
Botany Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150882 (URN)10.1007/s00442-018-4097-3 (DOI)000435111800016 ()29492690 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042590826 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Randriamanana, T. R., Nissinen, K., Ovaskainen, A., Lavola, A., Peltola, H., Albrectsen, B. R. & Julkunen-Tiitto, R. (2018). Does fungal endophyte inoculation affect the responses of aspen seedlings to carbon dioxide enrichment?. Fungal ecology, 33, 24-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does fungal endophyte inoculation affect the responses of aspen seedlings to carbon dioxide enrichment?
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2018 (English)In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 33, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Endophytes are microorganisms that live inside plants without causing visible symptoms, at least during some parts of their life cycle. We studied, for the first time, the combined effects of CO2 enrichment (700 ppm) and fungal endophyte inoculation on the growth, the concentrations of low-molecular weight phenolics, and condensed tannins of aspen (Populus tremula) seedlings. As expected, we found that the endophyte strain we inoculated was neutral to plant growth and was able to bypass major plant defences. In addition, CO2 enrichment alone boosted plant growth, but had only minor effects on plant phenolics. Neither did it affect the plant-endophyte relationship. Based on our findings, we suggest that the successful and asymptomatic colonization of endophytes that we found in aspen might be due to the endophytes' special attributes enabling them to thrive inside plant tissues and to avoid or counteract the plant's chemical defences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
balanced antagonism, carbon dioxide, condensed tannins, endophytes, phenolics, Populus
National Category
Microbiology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148824 (URN)10.1016/j.funeco.2017.12.002 (DOI)000431938500003 ()2-s2.0-85042186407 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-13Bibliographically approved
Agostinelli, M., Cleary, M., Martin, J. A., Albrectsen, B. R. & Witzell, J. (2018). Pedunculate Oaks (Quercus robur L.) Differing in Vitality as Reservoirs for Fungal Biodiversity. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 1758.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedunculate Oaks (Quercus robur L.) Differing in Vitality as Reservoirs for Fungal Biodiversity
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 1758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological significance of trees growing in urban and peri-urban settings is likely to increase in future land-use regimes, calling for better understanding of their role as potential reservoirs or stepping stones for associated biodiversity. We studied the diversity of fungal endophytes in woody tissues of asymptomatic even aged pedunculate oak trees, growing as amenity trees in a peri-urban setting. The trees were classified into three groups according to their phenotypic vitality (high, medium, and low). Endophytes were cultured on potato dextrose media from surface sterilized twigs and DNA sequencing was performed to reveal the taxonomic identity of the morphotypes. In xylem tissues, the frequency and diversity of endophytes was highest in oak trees showing reduced vitality. This difference was not found for bark samples, in which the endophyte infections were more frequent and communities more diverse than in xylem. In general, most taxa were shared across the samples with few morphotypes being recovered in unique samples. Leaf phenolic profiles were found to accurately classify the trees according to their phenotypic vitality. Our results confirm that xylem is more selective substrate for endophytes than bark and that endophyte assemblages in xylem are correlated to the degree of host vitality. Thus, high vitality of trees may be associated with reduced habitat quality to wood-associated endophytes.

Keywords
fungal diversity, endophytes, tree vitality, Quercus robur, network analysis, phenolics
National Category
Botany Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150816 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.01758 (DOI)000440694600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-1358
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Decker, V. H., Bandau, F., Gundale, M. J., Cole, C. T. & Albrectsen, B. R. (2017). Aspen phenylpropanoid genes’ expression levels correlate with genets’ tannin richness and vary both in responses to soil nitrogen and associations with phenolic profiles. Tree Physiology, 37(2), 270-279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspen phenylpropanoid genes’ expression levels correlate with genets’ tannin richness and vary both in responses to soil nitrogen and associations with phenolic profiles
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2017 (English)In: Tree Physiology, ISSN 0829-318X, E-ISSN 1758-4469, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 270-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Condensed tannin (CT) contents of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) vary among genotypes, and increases in nitrogen (N) availability generally reduce plants’ tannin production in favor of growth, through poorly understood mechanisms. We hypothesized that intrinsic tannin production rates may co-vary with gene expression responses to soil N and resource allocation within the phenylpropanoid pathway (PPP). Thus, we examined correlations between soil N levels and both expression patterns of eight PPP genes (measured by quantitative-reverse transcription PCR) and foliar phenolic compounds (measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry) in young aspen genets with intrinsically extreme CT levels. Monitored phenolics included salicinoids, lignins, flavones, flavonols, CT precursors and CTs. The PPP genes were consistently expressed more strongly in high-CT trees. Low N supplements reduced expression of genes throughout the PPP in all genets, while high N doses restored expression of genes at the beginning and end of the pathway. These PPP changes were not reflected in pools of tannin precursors, but varying correlations between gene expression and foliar phenolic pools were detected in young and mature leaves, suggesting that processes linking gene expression and the resulting phenolics vary spatially and temporally. Precursor fluxes suggested that CT-related metabolic rate or sink controls are linked to intrinsic carbon allocation strategies associated with N responses. Overall, we found more negative correlations (indicative of allocation trade-offs) between PPP gene expression and phenolic products following N additions in low-CT plants than in high-CT plants. The tannin-related expression dynamics suggest that, in addition to defense, relative tannin levels may also be indicative of intraspecific variations in the way aspen genets respond to soil fertility. 

Keywords
condensed tannins, European aspen, genotypic variation, nitrogen addition, phenylpropanoid pathway, Populus tremula, salicinoids
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126704 (URN)10.1093/treephys/tpw118 (DOI)000397052300012 ()
Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-10-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ponzio, C., Papazian, S., Albrectsen, B. R., Dicke, M. & Gols, R. (2017). Dual herbivore attack and herbivore density affect metabolic profiles of Brassica nigra leaves. Plant, Cell and Environment, 40(8), 1356-1367
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual herbivore attack and herbivore density affect metabolic profiles of Brassica nigra leaves
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2017 (English)In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1356-1367Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plant responses to dual herbivore attack are increasingly studied, but effects on the metabolome have largely been restricted to volatile metabolites and defence-related non-volatile metabolites. However, plants subjected to stress, such as herbivory, undergo major changes in both primary and secondary metabolism. Using a naturally occurring system, we investigated metabolome-wide effects of single or dual herbivory on Brassica nigra plants by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids and Pieris brassicae caterpillars, while also considering the effect of aphid density. Metabolomic analysis of leaf material showed that single and dual herbivory had strong effects on the plant metabolome, with caterpillar feeding having the strongest influence. Additionally, aphid-density-dependent effects were found in both the single and dual infestation scenarios. Multivariate analysis revealed treatment-specific metabolomic profiles, and effects were largely driven by alterations in the glucosinolate and sugar pools. Our work shows that analysing the plant metabolome as a single entity rather than as individual metabolites provides new insights into the subcellular processes underlying plant defence against multiple herbivore attackers. These processes appear to be importantly influenced by insect density.

Keywords
Brevicoryne brassicae, dual herbivory, induced defence, metabolomics, Pieris brassicae
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134649 (URN)10.1111/pce.12926 (DOI)000405275300010 ()
Available from: 2017-05-10 Created: 2017-05-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bandau, F., Albrectsen, B. R., Julkunen-Tiitto, R. & Gundale, M. J. (2017). Genotypic variability in Populus tremula L. affects how anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment influences litter decomposition. Plant and Soil, 410(1-2), 467-481
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genotypic variability in Populus tremula L. affects how anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment influences litter decomposition
2017 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 410, no 1-2, p. 467-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Boreal forests can receive substantial nitrogen (N) enrichment via atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. While it is known that N enrichment can impact ecosystem properties, such as litter decomposition, it remains poorly understood how genetic variability within plant species modifies these impacts. We grew replicates of ten Populus tremula L. genotypes (GTs) under 3 N conditions; ambient, and levels representing atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. We measured leaf and litter physical and chemical traits, and conducted a litter decomposition assay. Leaf traits varied due to N treatment, GT, and constitutive tannin levels. Leaf traits were in some cases correlated with litter traits, and decomposition was influenced by single and interactive effects of N and GT. Nitrogen addition unexpectedly decelerated decomposition, potentially due to changes in specific leaf area (SLA). Variation in decomposition rates among the GTs was best explained by their differences in SLA, and lignin:N ratio. Nitrogen addition also caused a shift in which traits most strongly influenced decomposition. Our findings highlight that the considerable diversity present in tree species can have a strong influence on ecosystem processes, such as decomposition, and how these processes respond to environmental change.

Keywords
Aspen, Condensed tannins, Genotypic variation, Genotype-environment interaction, Mass loss, trogen enrichment
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131879 (URN)10.1007/s11104-016-3033-8 (DOI)000392392200035 ()
Available from: 2017-02-24 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kloth, K. J., Busscher-Lange, J., Wiegers, G. L., Kruijer, W., Buijs, G., Meyer, R. C., . . . Jongsma, M. A. (2017). SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 Restricts Aphid Feeding on Arabidopsis during Heat Stress. The Plant Cell, 29(10), 2450-2464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 Restricts Aphid Feeding on Arabidopsis during Heat Stress
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2017 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 2450-2464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of phloem proteins in plant resistance to aphids is still largely elusive. By genome-wide association mapping of aphid behavior on 350 natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified the small heat shock-like SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 (SLI1). Detailed behavioral studies on near-isogenic and knockout lines showed that SLI1 impairs phloem feeding. Depending on the haplotype, aphids displayed a different duration of salivation in the phloem. On sli1 mutants, aphids prolonged their feeding sessions and ingested phloem at a higher rate than on wild-type plants. The largest phenotypic effects were observed at 26 degrees C, when SLI1 expression is upregulated. At this moderately high temperature, sli1 mutants suffered from retarded elongation of the inflorescence and impaired silique development. Fluorescent reporter fusions showed that SLI1 is confined to the margins of sieve elements where it lines the parietal layer and colocalizes in spherical bodies around mitochondria. This localization pattern is reminiscent of the clamp-like structures observed in previous ultrastructural studies of the phloem and shows that the parietal phloem layer plays an important role in plant resistance to aphids and heat stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SOC PLANT BIOLOGISTS, 2017
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142272 (URN)10.1105/tpc.16.00424 (DOI)000414861100015 ()
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Papazian, S., Khaling, E., Bonnet, C., Lassueur, S., Reymond, P., Moritz, T., . . . Albrectsen, B. R. (2016). Central Metabolic Responses to Ozone and Herbivory Affect Photosynthesis and Stomatal Closure. Plant Physiology, 172(3), 2057-2078
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Central Metabolic Responses to Ozone and Herbivory Affect Photosynthesis and Stomatal Closure
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2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 3, p. 2057-2078Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plants have evolved adaptive mechanisms that allow them to tolerate a continuous range of abiotic and biotic stressors. Tropospheric ozone (O-3), a global anthropogenic pollutant, directly affects living organisms and ecosystems, including plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we investigate the stress responses of Brassica nigra (wild black mustard) exposed consecutively to O-3 and the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae. Transcriptomics and metabolomics data were evaluated using multivariate, correlation, and network analyses for the O-3 and herbivory responses. O-3 stress symptoms resembled those of senescence and phosphate starvation, while a sequential shift from O-3 to herbivory induced characteristic plant defense responses, including a decrease in central metabolism, induction of the jasmonic acid/ethylene pathways, and emission of volatiles. Omics network and pathway analyses predicted a link between glycerol and central energy metabolism that influences the osmotic stress response and stomatal closure. Further physiological measurements confirmed that while O-3 stress inhibited photosynthesis and carbon assimilation, sequential herbivory counteracted the initial responses induced by O-3, resulting in a phenotype similar to that observed after herbivory alone. This study clarifies the consequences of multiple stress interactions on a plant metabolic system and also illustrates how omics data can be integrated to generate new hypotheses in ecology and plant physiology.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131106 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.01318 (DOI)000391172300051 ()27758847 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-02-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Soolanayakanahally, R. Y., Guy, R. D., Street, N. R., Robinson, K. M., Silim, S. N., Albrectsen, B. R. & Jansson, S. (2015). Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens. Frontiers in Plant Science, 6, Article ID 528.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens
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2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 6, article id 528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (g(S)) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (delta C-13) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media, 2015
Keywords
comparative physiology, poplar, common garden, latitude, bud set, photosynthesis, carbon isotope discrimination, water-use efficiency
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107300 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2015.00528 (DOI)000358589700001 ()26236324 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bandau, F., Decker, V. H., Gundale, M. J. & Albrectsen, B. R. (2015). Genotypic tannin levels in Populus tremula impact the way nitrogen enrichment affects growth and allocation responses for some traits and not for others. PLoS ONE, 10(10), Article ID e0140971.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genotypic tannin levels in Populus tremula impact the way nitrogen enrichment affects growth and allocation responses for some traits and not for others
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0140971Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root: shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype's baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a higher plasticity to nitrogen addition, and potentially an advantage when adapting to higher concentrations of soil nitrogen.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111477 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0140971 (DOI)000363248400088 ()26488414 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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