umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Nilsson, Kjell G
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Campbell, D., Callary, S., Field, J. & Nilsson, K. G. (2019). All-polyethylene tibial components in young patients have stable fixation; a comparison RSA study. Knee (Oxford), 26(2), 392-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>All-polyethylene tibial components in young patients have stable fixation; a comparison RSA study
2019 (English)In: Knee (Oxford), ISSN 0968-0160, E-ISSN 1873-5800, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 392-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: All-polyethylene (AP) tibial components in patients aged greater than 60 years have stable tibial migration patterns and favorable survival rates when compared to identical Metal-backed (MB) designs. Tibial component migration in younger patients has not been reported. The aim of this study was to examine the migration characteristics of patients aged less than 60 years compared to a previous cohort of AP and MB tibial components of identical design in older patients.

METHODS: A prospective consecutive study examined tibial component migration in 21 patients aged less than 60 years undergoing a cemented total knee arthroplasty with an AP tibial component by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) to 24 months. Results were compared to the authors' previous series of 21 patients aged greater than 60 years that were randomized to either an AP or MB tibial component.

RESULTS: Both age groups of patients implanted with an AP component had stable migration patterns with no patient having greater than 0.2° rotation or 0.2 mm maximum total point motion. Five of 11 MB tibial components displayed continued migration between one and two years. Subsidence was similar in all groups, whilst maximum total point motion was greater for the MB cohort (0.34 mm, 0.33 mm, 0.61 mm; AP <60, AP >60, MB).

CONCLUSIONS: Young patients implanted with an AP tibial component had stable tibial migration patterns comparable to older patients with the same AP implant. Regardless of age, AP tibial components were at least as stable as MB tibial components.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, Prospective comparative study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
All-polyethylene, Knee arthroplasty, Radiostereometry, Tibial migration
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157680 (URN)10.1016/j.knee.2018.12.003 (DOI)000470052400014 ()30638681 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Grip, H., Nilsson, K. G., Häger, C. G., Lundström, R. & Öhberg, F. (2019). Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors. Sensors, 19(14), Article ID 3240.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 14, article id 3240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A hip prosthesis design with larger femoral head size may improve functional outcomes compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA) design. Our aim was to compare the range of motion (RoM) in lower body joints during squats, gait and stair walking using a wearable movement analysis system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) in three age-matched male groups: 6 males with a conventional THA (THAC), 9 with a large femoral head (LFH) design, and 8 hip- and knee-asymptomatic controls (CTRL). We hypothesized that the LFH design would allow a greater hip RoM, providing movement patterns more like CTRL, and a larger side difference in hip RoM in THAC when compared to LFH and controls. IMUs were attached to the pelvis, thighs and shanks during five trials of squats, gait, and stair ascending/descending performed at self-selected speed. THAC and LFH participants completed the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS). The results showed a larger hip RoM during squats in LFH compared to THAC. Side differences in LFH and THAC groups (operated vs. non-operated side) indicated that movement function was not fully recovered in either group, further corroborated by non-maximal mean HOOS scores (LFH: 83 +/- 13, THAC: 84 +/- 19 groups, vs. normal function 100). The IMU system may have the potential to enhance clinical movement evaluations as an adjunct to clinical scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
MEMS, gyroscopes, accelerometers, total hip arthroplasty, movement analysis
National Category
Orthopaedics Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162882 (URN)10.3390/s19143240 (DOI)000479160300207 ()31340548 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Suijkerbuijk, M. A. M., Ponzetti, M., Rahim, M., Posthumus, M., Häger, C., Stattin, E., . . . September, A. V. (2019). Functional polymorphisms within the inflammatory pathway regulate expression of extracellular matrix components in a genetic risk dependent model for anterior cruciate ligament injuries.. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 22(11), 1219-1225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional polymorphisms within the inflammatory pathway regulate expression of extracellular matrix components in a genetic risk dependent model for anterior cruciate ligament injuries.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1219-1225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the functional effect of genetic polymorphisms of the inflammatory pathway on structural extracellular matrix components (ECM) and the susceptibility to an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.

DESIGN: Laboratory study, case-control study.

METHODS: Eight healthy participants were genotyped for interleukin (IL)1B rs16944 C>T and IL6 rs1800795 G>C and classified into genetic risk profile groups. Differences in type I collagen (COL1A1), type V collagen (COL5A1), biglycan (BGN) and decorin (DCN) gene expression were measured in fibroblasts either unstimulated or following IL-1β, IL-6 or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α treatment. Moreover, a genetic association study was conducted in: (i) a Swedish cohort comprised of 116 asymptomatic controls (CON) and 79 ACL ruptures and (ii) a South African cohort of 100 CONs and 98 ACLs. Participants were genotyped for COL5A1 rs12722 C>T, IL1B rs16944 C>T, IL6 rs1800795 G>C and IL6R rs2228145 G>C.

RESULTS: IL1B high-risk fibroblasts had decreased BGN (p=0.020) and COL5A1 (p=0.012) levels after IL-1β stimulation and expressed less COL5A1 (p=0.042) following TNF-α treatment. Similarly, unstimulated IL6 high-risk fibroblasts had lower COL5A1 (p=0.012) levels than IL6 low-risk fibroblasts. In the genetic association study, the COL5A1-IL1B-IL6 T-C-G (p=0.034, Haplo-score 2.1) and the COL5A1-IL1B-IL6R T-C-A (p=0.044, Haplo-score: 2.0) combinations were associated with an increased susceptibility to ACL injury in the Swedish cohort when only male participants were evaluated.

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that polymorphisms within genes of the inflammatory pathway modulate the expression of structural and fibril-associated ECM components in a genetic risk depended manner, contributing to an increased susceptibility to ACL injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Anterior cruciate ligament injury, Extracellular matrix, Genetics, Personalized medicine, Polymorphisms
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163874 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2019.07.012 (DOI)31395468 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072364464 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Vårbakken, K., Lorås, H., Nilsson, K. G., Engdal, M. & Stensdotter, A. K. (2019). Relative difference among 27 functional measures in patients with knee osteoarthritis: an exploratory cross-sectional case-control study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 20(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relative difference among 27 functional measures in patients with knee osteoarthritis: an exploratory cross-sectional case-control study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To raise the effectiveness of interventions, clinicians should evaluate important biopsychosocial aspects of the patient's situation. There is limited knowledge of which factors according to the International Classification of Function, Disability, and Health (ICF) are most deviant between patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and healthy individuals. To assist in measures' selection, we aimed to quantify the differences between patients with KOA and healthy controls on various measures across the ICF dimensions of body function, activity, and participation.

Methods: We performed an exploratory cross-sectional case-control study. In total, 28 patients with mild-to-moderate KOA (mean age 61years, 64% women) referred by general physicians to a hospital's osteoarthritis-school, and 31 healthy participants (mean age 55years, 52% women), volunteered. We compared between-group differences on 27 physical and self-reported measures derived from treatment guidelines, trial recommendations, and trial/outcome reviews. Independent t-test, Chi-square, and Mann-Whitney U test evaluated the significance for continuous parametric, dichotomous, and ordinal data, respectively. For parametric data, effect sizes were calculated as Cohen's d. For non-parametric data, ds were estimated by p-values and sample sizes according to statistical formulas. Finally, all ds were ranked and interpreted after Hopkins' scale. An age-adjusted sensitivity-analysis on parametric data validated those conclusions.

Results: Very large differences between patients and controls were found on the Pain numeric rating scale(1), the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Scale (KOOS, all subscales)(2), as well as the orebro Musculoskeletal psychosocial scale(3) (P<0.0001). Large differences were found on the Timed 10-steps-up-and-down stair climb test(4) and Accelerometer registered vigorous-intensity physical activity in daily life(5) (P<0.001). Respectively, these measures clustered on ICF as follows: (1)body function, (2)all three ICF-dimensions, (3)body function and participation, (4)activity, and (5)participation.

Limitations: The limited sample excluded elderly patients with severe obesity.

Conclusions: Very large differences across all ICF dimensions were indicated for the KOOS and orebro questionnaires together for patients aged 45-70 with KOA. Clinicians are suggested to use them as means of selecting supplementary measures with appropriate discriminative characteristics and clear links to effective therapy. Confirmative studies are needed to further validate these explorative and partly age-unadjusted conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Osteoarthritis, knee, Muscle strength dynamometer, Physical fitness, Physical examination, Physical activity, Exercise, Activities of daily living, International classification of functioning, disability, and health, Psychology, Sociological factors
National Category
Physiotherapy Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166490 (URN)10.1186/s12891-019-2845-0 (DOI)000491317600005 ()31638971 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Seale, K., Burger, M., Posthumus, M., Häger, C., Stattin, E., Nilsson, K. G., . . . September, A. V. (2019). The Apoptosis Pathway and CASP8 Variants Conferring Risk for Acute and Overuse Musculoskeletal Injuries. Journal of Orthopaedic Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Apoptosis Pathway and CASP8 Variants Conferring Risk for Acute and Overuse Musculoskeletal Injuries
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, ISSN 0736-0266, E-ISSN 1554-527XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Rotator cuff tendinopathy (RCT), anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), are examples of chronic (RCT and CTS) and acute (ACL ruptures) musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. These injuries are multifactorial in nature, with several identified intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Previous studies have implicated specific sequence variants within genes encoding structural and regulatory components of the extracellular matrix of tendons and/ligaments to predispose individuals to these injuries. An example, includes the association of sequence variants within the apoptotic regulatory gene, caspase-8 (CASP8) with other musculoskeletal injury phenotypes, such as Achilles tendinopathy. The primary aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate previously implicated DNA sequence variants within CASP8: rs3834129 (ins/del) and rs1045485 (G/C), and the rs13113 (T/A) identified using a whole exome sequencing approach, with risk of musculoskeletal injury phenotypes (RCT, ACL ruptures, and CTS) in three independent studies. In addition, the aim was to implicate a CASP8 genomic interval in the modulation of risk of RCT, ACL ruptures, or CTS. It was found that the AA genotype of CASP8 rs13113 (T/A) was independently associated with increased risk for CTS. In addition, it was found that the del-C haplotype (rs3834129-rs1045485) was significantly associated with non-contact ACL ruptures, which is in alignment with previous research findings. Collectively, the results of this study implicate the apoptosis pathway as biologically significant in the underlying pathogenesis of musculoskeletal injury phenotypes. These findings should be repeated in larger sample cohorts and across different populations.

Keywords
ACL, biomarkers, carpal tunnel, genetics and genomics, ligament, matrix degradation, rotator cuff, statistics, tendon
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165228 (URN)10.1002/jor.24504 (DOI)31692049 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-15 Created: 2019-11-15 Last updated: 2019-11-21
Heijbel, S., Naili, J. E., Hedin, A., W-Dahl, A., Nilsson, K. G. & Hedström, M. (2019). The Forgotten Joint Score-12 in Swedish patients undergoing knee arthroplasty: a validation study with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) as comparator. Acta Orthopaedica
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Forgotten Joint Score-12 in Swedish patients undergoing knee arthroplasty: a validation study with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) as comparator
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose — Having patients self-evaluate the outcome is an important part of the follow-up after knee arthroplasty. The Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) introduced joint awareness as a new approach, suggested to be sensitive enough to differentiate well-functioning patients. This study evaluated the Swedish translation of the FJS-12 and investigated the validity, reliability, and interpretability in patients undergoing knee arthroplasty.

Patients and methods — We included 109 consecutive patients 1 year after primary knee arthroplasty to assess construct validity (Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r), internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha [CA]), floor and ceiling effects, and score distribution. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was the comparator instrument for the analyses. Further, 31 patients preoperatively and 22 patients postoperatively were included to assess test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]).

Results — Construct validity was moderate to excellent (r = 0.62–0.84). The FJS-12 showed a high degree of internal consistency (CA = 0.96). The ICC was good preoperatively (0.76) and postoperatively (0.87). Ceiling effects were 2.8% in the FJS-12 and ranging between 0.9% and 10% in the KOOS.

Interpretation — The Swedish translation of the FJS-12 showed good validity and reliability and can be used to assess outcome after knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the FJS-12 shows promising results in its ability to differentiate well-functioning patients. Future studies on unidimensionality, scale validity, interpretability, and responsiveness are needed for a more explicit analysis of the psychometric properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165754 (URN)10.1080/17453674.2019.1689327 (DOI)000495836700001 ()31711349 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2019-12-09
Otten, V. T., Mukka, S., Nilsson, K. G., Crnalic, S. & Kärrholm, J. (2019). Uncemented cups with and without screw holes in primary THA: a Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register study with 22,725 hips. Acta Orthopaedica, 90(3), 258-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncemented cups with and without screw holes in primary THA: a Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register study with 22,725 hips
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 258-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose — Uncemented cups in total hip arthroplasty (THA) are often augmented with additional screws to enhance their primary stability. We investigated whether there is a difference in the risk for revision between cups with screw holes and cups without screw holes.

Patients and methods — We analyzed the risk for cup revision of uncemented cups registered in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR) between 2000 and 2017 with respe ct to the presence of screw holes. Only patients with primary osteoarthritis (OA) were included. 22,725 cups, including 12,354 without screw holes and 10,371 with screw holes, were evaluated. Revision rates at 2 and 10 years after the primary operation were analyzed.

Results — At a median follow-up time of 3.4 years (0–18), 459 cup revisions were reported. The main reasons for cup revision during the whole observation time were infection, 52% of all cup revisions, and dislocation, 26% of all cup revisions. The survival rate with cup revision due to aseptic loosening as endpoint was 99.9% (95% CI 99.8–99.9) at 2 years for both cups with and cups without screw holes, and the survival rates at 10 years were 99.5% (CI 99.3–99.7) and 99.1% (CI 98.6–99.5), respectively. Cups without screw holes showed a decreased risk of revision due to any reason at both 2 years (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.6, CI 0.5–0.8) and 10 years (HR 0.7, CI 0.5–0.9).

Interpretation — We found a very low revision rate for aseptic loosening with modern, uncemented cup designs. Cups with screw holes had an increased risk of revision due to any reason in patients with primary OA

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158054 (URN)10.1080/17453674.2019.1599777 (DOI)000469038600013 ()30955399 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Wojtowicz, R., Henricson, A., Nilsson, K. G. & Crnalic, S. (2019). Uncemented monoblock trabecular metal posterior stabilized high-flex total knee arthroplasty: similar pattern of migration to the cruciate-retaining design - a prospective radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and clinical evaluation of 40 patients (49 knees) 60 years or younger with 9 years' follow-up. Acta Orthopaedica, 90(5), 460-466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncemented monoblock trabecular metal posterior stabilized high-flex total knee arthroplasty: similar pattern of migration to the cruciate-retaining design - a prospective radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and clinical evaluation of 40 patients (49 knees) 60 years or younger with 9 years' follow-up
2019 (English)In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 460-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and purpose — Uncemented monoblock cruciate retaining (CR) trabecular metal (TM) tibial components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) work well in the long-term perspective in patients ≤ 60 years. Younger persons expect nearly normal knee flexion after TKA, but CR implants generally achieve less knee flexion compared with posterior stabilized (PS) implants. Cemented PS implants have higher revision rate than CR implants. Can an uncemented monoblock PS TM implant be used safely in younger patients?

Patients and methods — 40 patients (49 knees) age ≤ 60 years with primary (20 knees) or posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA) were operated with a high-flex TKA using an uncemented monoblock PS TM tibial component. Knees were evaluated with radiostereometric analysis (RSA) a mean 3 days (1–5) postoperatively, and thereafter at 6 weeks, 3 months, 1, 2, 5, and 9 years. Clinical outcome was measured with patient-related outcome measures (PROMs).

Results — The implants showed a pattern of migration with initial large migration followed by early stabilization lasting up to 9 years, a pattern known to be compatible with good long-term results. Clinical and radiological outcome was excellent with 38 of the 40 patients being satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure and bone apposition to the entire implant surface in 46 of 49 knees. Mean knee flexion was 130°. 1 knee was revised at 3 months due to medial tibial condyle collapse.

Interpretation — The uncemented monoblock PS TM implant works well in younger persons operated with TKA due to primary or secondary OA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161717 (URN)10.1080/17453674.2019.1626097 (DOI)000473539500001 ()31210081 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-26 Created: 2019-07-26 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Henricson, A., Wojtowicz, R., Nilsson, K. G. & Crnalic, S. (2019). Uncemented or cemented femoral components work equally well in total knee arthroplasty. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 27(4), 1251-1258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uncemented or cemented femoral components work equally well in total knee arthroplasty
2019 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1251-1258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To study the pattern of migration and clinical results up to 10 years of uncemented versus cemented fixation of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty.

METHODS: Randomized controlled trial was conducted of 41 patients (23 women, 18 men) under the age of 60 years using radiostereometric analysis.

RESULTS: About two-thirds of the cemented implants and half of the uncemented implants stabilized between 2 and 10 years, while the remainder displayed a small annual increase of maximum total point motion of 0.09-0.10 mm/year. At 10 years there were no statistically significant differences in migration or clinical results between the groups.

CONCLUSION: Uncemented fixation with titanium fiber mesh coating of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty works equally as well as cemented fixation up to 10 years. An annual migration of 0.1 mm seems compatible with excellent long-term performance.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: I.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Femoral component TKA, RSA, Total knee arthroplasty, Uncemented TKA
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157681 (URN)10.1007/s00167-018-5227-5 (DOI)000462637500030 ()30361757 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Otten, V., Maguire, G. Q. J., Noz, M. E., Zeleznik, M. P., Nilsson, K. G. & Olivecrona, H. (2017). Are CT Scans a Satisfactory Substitute for the Follow-Up of RSA Migration Studies of Uncemented Cups?: A Comparison of RSA Double Examinations and CT Datasets of 46 Total Hip Arthroplasties. BioMed Research International, 2017, Article ID 3681458.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are CT Scans a Satisfactory Substitute for the Follow-Up of RSA Migration Studies of Uncemented Cups?: A Comparison of RSA Double Examinations and CT Datasets of 46 Total Hip Arthroplasties
Show others...
2017 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2017, article id 3681458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As part of the 14-year follow-up of a prospectively randomized radiostereometry (RSA) study on uncemented cup fixation, two pairs of stereo radiographs and a CT scan of 46 hips were compared. Tantalum beads, inserted during the primary operation, were detected in the CT volume and the stereo radiographs and used to produce datasets of 3D coordinates. The limit of agreement between the combined CT and RSA datasets was calculated in the same way as the precision of the double RSA examination. The precision of RSA corresponding to the 99% confidence interval was 1.36 degrees, 1.36 degrees, and 0.60 degrees for X-, Y-, and Z-rotation and 0.40, 0.17, and 0.37mm for X-, Y-, and Z-translation. The limit of agreement between CT and RSA was 1.51 degrees, 2.17 degrees, and 1.05 degrees for rotation and 0.59, 0.56, and 0.74mm for translation. The differences between CT and RSA are close to the described normal 99% confidence interval for precision in RSA: 0.3 degrees to 2 degrees for rotation and 0.15 to 0.6mm for translation. We conclude that measurements using CT and RSA are comparable and that CT can be used for migration studies for longitudinal evaluations of patients with RSA markers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2017
National Category
Orthopaedics Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131265 (URN)10.1155/2017/3681458 (DOI)000394010400001 ()
Available from: 2017-02-10 Created: 2017-02-10 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications