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Eriksson, L., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries. Nutrients, 11(7), Article ID 1491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste and diet preferences are complex and influenced by both environmental and host traits while affecting both food selection and associated health outcomes. The present study genotyped 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously reported taste and food intake related genes and assessed associations with taste threshold (TT) and preferred intensity (PT) of sweet, sour and bitter, food preferences, habitual diet intake, and caries status in healthy young Swedish men and women (n = 127). Polymorphisms in the GNAT3, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes were associated with variation in TT and PT for sweet taste as well as sweet food intake. Increasing PT for sweet was associated with increasing preference and intake of sugary foods. Similarly, increasing TT for sour was associated with increasing intake of sour foods, whereas the associations between food preference/intake and TT/PT for bitter was weak in this study group. Finally, allelic variation in the GNAT3, SLC2A2, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes was associated with caries status, whereas TT, PT and food preferences were not. It was concluded that variations in taste receptor, glucose transporter and gustducin encoding genes are related to taste perception, food preference and intake as well as the sugar-dependent caries disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
taste perception, taste preference, taste genes, diet preference, diet selection, caries
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162681 (URN)10.3390/nu11071491 (DOI)000478885400090 ()31261961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Brunius, C., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA6) catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in saliva with possible pH regulation, taste perception, and tooth formation effects. This study assessed effects of variation in the CA6 gene on oral microbiota and specifically the acidophilic and caries-associated Streptococcus mutans in 17-year old Swedish adolescents (n = 154). Associations with caries status and secreted CA6 protein were also evaluated. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (27 SNPs in 5 haploblocks) and saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota from Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing and culturing were analysed. Haploblock 4 (rs10864376, rs3737665, rs12138897) CCC associated with low prevalence of S. mutans (OR (95% CI): 0.5 (0.3, 0.8)), and caries (OR 0.6 (0.3, 0.9)), whereas haploblock 4 TTG associated with high prevalence of S. mutans (OR: 2.7 (1.2, 5.9)) and caries (OR: 2.3 (1.2, 4.4)). The TTG-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(G)) was characterized by S. mutans, Scardovia wiggsiae, Treponema sp. HOT268, Tannerella sp. HOT286, Veillonella gp.1 compared with the CCC-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(C)). Secreted CA6 in saliva was weakly linked to CA6 gene variation. In conclusion, the results indicate that CA6 gene polymorphisms influence S. mutans colonization, tooth biofilm microbiota composition and risk of dental caries in Swedish adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155838 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36832-z (DOI)000456553400018 ()30679524 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Huseinovic, E., Hörnell, A., Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Lindahl, B. & Winkvist, A. (2019). Changes in food intake patterns during 2000–2007 and 2008–2016 in the population-based Northern Sweden Diet Database. Nutrition Journal, 18, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in food intake patterns during 2000–2007 and 2008–2016 in the population-based Northern Sweden Diet Database
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Food intake patterns provide a summary of dietary intake. Few studies have examined trends in food intake patterns over time in large, population-based studies. We examined food intake patterns and related sociodemographic and individual characteristics in the large Northern Sweden Diet Database during the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016.

Methods: In total, 100 507 participants (51% women) who had filled in a 64-item food frequency questionnaire and provided background and sociodemographic data between 2000 and 2016 were included. Food intake patterns were evaluated for women and men separately for the two time windows 2000–2007 and 2008–2016, respectively. Latent class analysis was used to identify distinct, latent clusters based on 40 food groups.

Results: Among both women and men, a greater proportion of participants were classified into food intake patterns characterized by high-fat spread and high-fat dairy during 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007. In the earlier time window, these high-fat clusters were related to lower educational level and smoking. Simultaneously, the proportion of women and men classified into a cluster characterized by high intake of fruit, vegetables, and fibre decreased from the earlier to the later time window.

Conclusion: From a public health perspective, the increase in clusters with a high conditional mean for high-fat spread and high-fat dairy and decrease in clusters with a high conditional mean for fruit and vegetables, during the time period 2008–2016 compared to 2000–2007, is worrisome as it indicates a shift away from the recommended food habits. Subgroups of women and men with less healthy dietary patterns in the time window 2008–2016 with lower education, lower age, higher body mass index, lower levels of physical activity and more smoking were identified and future interventions may be targeted towards these groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Food intake patterns, Dietary patterns, FFQ, NSDD, Diet, Time trends
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161908 (URN)10.1186/s12937-019-0464-0 (DOI)000475681700001 ()31299991 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068890784 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Nilsson, L. M., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P. & Winkvist, A. (2019). Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients, 11(284)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Product Intake and Cardiometabolic Diseases in Northern Sweden: A 33-Year Prospective Cohort Study
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dairy products are important constituents of most diets, and their association with adverse health outcomes remains a focus. We characterized dairy food intake and examined associations with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke among 108,065 Swedish men and women. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards models in a population characterized by high milk tolerance. During a mean follow-up of 14.2 years, 11,641 first-time events occurred. Non-fermented milk intake decreased, whereas butter intake increased over the period. For high intake of non-fermented milk, the HR (95% CI) for developing T2D and MI was 1.17 (1.03, 1.34) and 1.23 (1.10, 1.37), respectively, in men. A greater intake of butter, fermented milk, and cheese tended to be associated with a reduced risk of T2D and/or MI. Non-consumers and those who chose low-fat variants of the targeted dairy products had increased risk for T2D, MI, or stroke compared to those in the non-case group. Generally, effect-sizes were small. This prospective study found that non-fermented milk was associated with an increased risk for developing T2D and MI and that subjects abstaining from dairy products or choosing low-fat variants were at greater risk. However, the overall cardiometabolic risk of non-fermented milk intake was judged as low, since the effect sizes were small.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156027 (URN)10.3390/nu11020284 (DOI)000460829700075 ()30696081 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060813708 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L. M., Winkvist, A., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H., Wennberg, P., van Guelpen, B. & Johansson, I. (2019). Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population. Nutrition and Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population
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2019 (English)In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
dairy products, milk, cheese, fermented milk, cancer
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161682 (URN)10.1080/01635581.2019.1637441 (DOI)000476072800001 ()31298944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068900342 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-25 Created: 2019-07-25 Last updated: 2019-08-12
Esberg, A., Isehed, C., Holmlund, A. & Lundberg, P. (2019). Peri-implant crevicular fluid proteome before and after adjunctive enamel matrix derivative treatment of peri-implantitis. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 46(6), 669-677
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peri-implant crevicular fluid proteome before and after adjunctive enamel matrix derivative treatment of peri-implantitis
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 669-677Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore which peri‐implant crevicular fluid (PICF) protein pattern is associated with the active peri‐implantitis process.

Materials and methods: Peri‐implant crevicular fluid from 25 peri‐implantitis sites were subjected to proteomic analysis using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry before and at 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, to identify associations between PICF protein pattern and implant loss, bleeding on probing, pocket depth and enamel matrix derivative (EMD) treatment.

Results: Clustering of subjects based on their 3–12 months PICF proteomic profiles by principal component analysis defined two major clusters. Cluster 2 differentiated from cluster 3 by 52 proteins (R2 = 90%, Q2 = 80%) and belonging to cluster 2 was associated with implant loss (p = 0.009) and bleeding on probing (p = 0.001). Cluster 3 was associated with implant survival and EMD treatment (p = 0.044).

Conclusion: Here, we demonstrate that a specific PICF proteomic profile associates with active peri‐implantitis process and implant loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
enamel matrix derivative, implant, peri-implantitis, proteome
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159844 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13108 (DOI)000468314400008 ()30985016 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Nilsson, L. M., Esberg, A., Jansson, J.-H. & Winkvist, A. (2018). Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population. Nutrition Journal, 17, Article ID 110.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population
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2018 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The association between milk and dairy intake and the incidence of cardiometabolic diseases, cancer and mortality has been evaluated in many studies, but these studies have had conflicting results with no clear conclusion on causal or confounding associations. The present study aims to further address this association by cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of the associations between exposure to various types of dairy products and metabolic risk markers among inhabitants in northern Sweden while taking other lifestyle factors into account.

Methods: Respondents in the Vasterbotten Intervention Programme with complete and plausible diet data between 1991 and 2016 were included, yielding 124,934 observations from 90,512 unique subjects. For longitudinal analysis, 27,682 participants with a visit 8-12years after the first visit were identified. All participants completed a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Metabolic risk markers, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum (S) cholesterol and triglycerides, and blood glucose, were measured. Participants were categorized into quintiles by intake of dairy products, and risk (odds ratios, OR) of undesirable levels of metabolic risk markers was assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In longitudinal analyses, intake quintiles were related to desirable levels of metabolic risk markers at both visits or deterioration at follow-up using Cox regression analyses.

Results: The OR of being classified with an undesirable BMI decreased with increasing quintiles of total dairy, cheese and butter intake but increased with increasing non-fermented milk intake. The OR of being classified with an undesirable S-cholesterol level increased with increasing intake of total dairy, butter and high fat (3%) non-fermented milk, whereas an undesirable S-triglyceride level was inversely associated with cheese and butter intake in women. In longitudinal analyses, increasing butter intake was associated with deterioration of S-cholesterol and blood glucose levels, whereas increasing cheese intake was associated with a lower risk of deterioration of S-triglycerides.

Conclusions: Confounding factors likely contribute to the demonstrated association between dairy intake and mortality, and other medical conditions and analyses should be stratified by dairy type.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Dairy products, Milk, Cheese, Butter, Fermented milk, Non-fermented milk, BMI, Serum lipids, Blood glucose, Blood pressure
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154046 (URN)10.1186/s12937-018-0418-y (DOI)000451026300003 ()30466440 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Lif Holgerson, P., Esberg, A. & Johansson, I. (2018). Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans. Journal of Dental Research, 97(3), 275-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans
2018 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus mutans is a key bacterial species in the caries process, which affects >90% of the population worldwide. However, other acidogenic and aciduric/acidophilic species may contribute to disease development. In Sweden, a country with low prevalences of caries and S. mutans, a significant portion of caries-affected adolescents lack detectable levels of S. mutans. The objectives of the present study were 1) to characterize the tooth biofilm and saliva microbiota of adolescents with caries disease, with or without detectable S. mutans, from tooth biofilm and saliva samples and 2) to assess taxa clustering in the tooth biofilm and saliva samples and relate this information to caries status. For 17-y-old participants ( N = 154), enamel and dentin caries (the total number of present carious surfaces in the enamel and dentin) and caries experience (the number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces) were recorded, dental biofilm and saliva samples obtained, and information on medical and lifestyle habits collected. Multiplex 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing of bacterial DNA was performed with the Illumina MiSeq platform. The Human Oral Microbiome Database and the ProbeSeq pipeline were used in the HOMI NGS procedure. In subjects with caries experience, high levels of S. mutans were associated with a few species and low levels with a panel of saccharolytic species. Present caries was similarly associated with a panel of saccharolytic species in subjects without S. mutans. Furthermore, tooth biofilm microbiota could be used to establish 4 clusters of subjects with different caries experiences. In particular, high levels of S. mutans were associated with the presence of a few influential species in multivariate modeling, including Scardovia wiggsiae. By contrast, a panel of less avid lactic acid-producing species was influential in patients with undetectable or low S. mutans levels in such modeling. These findings support a prominent role of S. mutans in infected adolescents but also the ecologic concept, especially in S. mutans-free subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
microbiota, saliva, tooth biofilm, adolescents, 16S, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139760 (URN)10.1177/0022034517731758 (DOI)000429319800005 ()28930642 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Eriksson, L., Haworth, S. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0193504.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bovine milk intake has been associated with various disease outcomes, with modulation of the gastro-intestinal microbiome being suggested as one potential mechanism. The aim of the present study was to explore the oral microbiota in relation to variation in self-reported milk intake. Saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota was characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and cultivation in 154 Swedish adolescents, and information on diet and other lifestyle markers were obtained from a questionnaire, and dental caries from clinical examination. A replication cohort of 31,571 adults with similar information on diet intake, other lifestyle markers and caries was also studied. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modelling separated adolescents with low milk intake (lowest tertile with <0.4 servings/day) apart from those with high intake of milk (≥3.7 servings/day) based on saliva and tooth biofilm, respectively. Taxa in several genera contributed to this separation, and milk intake was inversely associated with the caries causing Streptococcus mutans in saliva and tooth biofilm samples by sequencing, PCR and cultivation. Despite the difference in S. mutans colonization, caries prevalence did not differ between milk consumption groups in the adolescents or the adults in the replication cohort, which may reflect that a significant positive association between intake of milk and sweet products was present in both the study and replication group. It was concluded that high milk intake correlates with different oral microbiota and it is hypothesized that milk may confer similar effects in the gut. The study also illustrated that reduction of one single disease associated bacterial species, such as S. mutans by milk intake, may modulate but not prevent development of complex diseases, such as caries, due to adverse effects from other causal factors, such as sugar intake in the present study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
Keywords
saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, dairy products, streptococcus mutans, dental caries, cardiovascular disease, lactase persistence, in vitro, health, cancer, mortality
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146286 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0193504 (DOI)000427931600019 ()29561863 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claesson, R., Sjögren, U., Esberg, A., Brundin, M. & Granlund, M. (2017). Actinomyces radicidentis and Actinomyces haliotis, coccoid Actinomyces species isolated from the human oral cavity. Anaerobe, 48, 19-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Actinomyces radicidentis and Actinomyces haliotis, coccoid Actinomyces species isolated from the human oral cavity
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2017 (English)In: Anaerobe, ISSN 1075-9964, E-ISSN 1095-8274, Vol. 48, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are few reports on the bacterial species Actinomyces radicidentis in the literature. In this study, putative A. radicidentis isolates were collected from 16 root canal samples from 601 examined patients. The isolates were examined by biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Arbitrarily-primed (AP-) PCR, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and MALDI-TOF analyses. In parallel, two A. radicidentis reference strains and two putative A. radicidentis isolates from United Kingdom were tested. Sixteen of the 18 isolates were confirmed as A. radicidentis. The remaining two isolates, both of which were isolated from root canals (one from Sweden and the other from the UK), but were identified as Actinomyces haliotis by sequencing ∼ 1300 base pairs of the 16S rRNA-gene. This isolates had a divergent, but between them similar, AP-PCR pattern, and a common distribution of sequence signatures in the 16S rRNA gene, but were not identified by MALDI-TOF. A. haliotis is a close relative to A. radicidentis, hitherto only been described from a sea-snail. The identity of A. haliotis was confirmed by a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences with species specific sequences included, and by additional biochemical tests. The examined bacteria exhibited similar antibiotic susceptibility patterns when tested for 10 separate antibiotic classes with E-tests (bioMérieux). The MIC90 for β-lactams (benzylpenicillin and cefuroxime) and vancomycin was 0.5 mg/L, for colistin and ciprofloxacin 8 mg/mL and for the other antibiotic classes ≤ 25 mg/mL The isolation of A. haliotis from infected dental root canals cast doubt on the accepted opinion that all Actinomyces infections have an endogenous source.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
AP-PCR phylogenetic tree, actinomyces species, MALDI-TOF, root canal infections
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139074 (URN)10.1016/j.anaerobe.2017.06.011 (DOI)000419417700004 ()28647397 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4430-8125

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