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BETA
Marell, Agneta
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Biedenbach, T., Marell, A. & Vanyushyn, V. (2018). Industry-university collaboration and absorptive capacity: an empirical study in a Swedish context. International Journal of Technology Management, 76(1-2), 81-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industry-university collaboration and absorptive capacity: an empirical study in a Swedish context
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 76, no 1-2, p. 81-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we examine the role of firms' absorptive capacity in industry-university collaboration and, in particular, whether absorptive capacity moderates the effects of university collaboration on firms' innovativeness. Having defined absorptive capacity as the recognition, assimilation and application of valuable external knowledge for commercial purposes, we formulated three hypotheses pertaining to firm innovativeness and tested them in an original survey comprising a representative multi-industry sample of 1,532 Swedish firms. The results suggest that benefiting from university cooperation is conditional upon the firm's level of absorptive capacity. At low levels of absorptive capacity, engaging with universities does not translate into any noticeable increase in innovative output. In contrast, medium to high levels of absorptive capacity is where a firm benefit most from collaborating with a university. We also show that these effects are more pronounced for firms operating in sectors characterised by lower levels of technology and knowledge intensity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2018
Keywords
industry-university collaboration, innovation performance, absorptive capacity, ABSCAP, moderating fect, business-university collaboration, academic collaboration, innovativeness, innovative output, knowledge intensity, technology intensity, survey, multi-industry sample, cross-sectoral study, Sweden
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144846 (URN)10.1504/IJTM.2018.10009599 (DOI)000423295900005 ()
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Gärling, T. & Marell, A. (2017). Effects of time pressure, type of shopping, and store attributes on consumers’ satisfaction with grocery shopping. International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, 27(4), 334-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of time pressure, type of shopping, and store attributes on consumers’ satisfaction with grocery shopping
2017 (English)In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 334-351Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to investigate whether satisfaction with grocery stores is affected by type of grocery shopping in conjunction with time pressure, and which attributes are important for satisfaction. Fictitious grocery stores are constructed according to a fractional factorial design by varying access, price level, supply quality/range, and service quality. In an Internet survey, 1023 Swedish consumers rated satisfaction with major vs. fill-in shopping imagining they were under high or low time pressure. The results showed that satisfaction is higher for fill-in shopping than major shopping, that time pressure has no effect on satisfaction, and that price level, service quality, and product quality/range are more important for satisfaction with major shopping, whereas access is more important for satisfaction with fill-in shopping. It is also found that the importance of attributes for satisfaction depends on type of shopping more than on individual characteristics.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120266 (URN)10.1080/09593969.2017.1309674 (DOI)000411052900002 ()
Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Biedenbach, G., Bengtsson, M. & Marell, A. (2015). Brand equity, satisfaction, and switching costs: An examination of effects in the business-to-business setting. Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 33(2), 164-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brand equity, satisfaction, and switching costs: An examination of effects in the business-to-business setting
2015 (English)In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 164-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of satisfaction and switching costs on the development of brand equity in the business-to-business setting. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze 632 responses from the CEOs and CFOs of organizations buying auditing and business consultancy services from one of the Big Four auditing companies. The findings demonstrate the significant impact of satisfaction and switching costs on B2B brand equity. Furthermore, the findings show the positive effect of switching costs on satisfaction. The findings provide a strong foundation for further investigation of links between the key marketing concepts: brand equity, satisfaction, and switching costs.

Keywords
Brand equity, satisfaction, switching costs, brand management, professional services, business-to-business marketing
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101092 (URN)10.1108/MIP-03-2014-0059 (DOI)000355726800004 ()2-s2.0-84925150816 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-19 Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Gärling, T., Marell, A. & Nordvall, A.-C. (2015). Importance ratings of grocery store attributes. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 43(1), 63-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance ratings of grocery store attributes
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, ISSN 0959-0552, E-ISSN 1758-6690, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 63-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive set of grocery store attributes that can be standardized and used in empirical research aiming at increasing retailers´ understanding of determinants of grocery store choice, and assessing how the relative importance of the attributes is affected by consumer socio-demographic characteristics and shopping behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach: An Internet survey of 1,575 Swedish consumers was conducted. A large set of attributes was rated by the participants on seven-point scales with respect to their importance for choice of grocery store. Principal component analysis resulted in a reduced set of reliably measured aggregated attributes. This set included the attractiveness attributes price level, supply range, supply quality, service quality, storescape quality, facilities for childcare, and closeness to other stores, and the accessibility attributes easy access by car, easy access by other travel modes, and availability (closeness to store and opening hours).

Findings: The results showed that accessibility by car is the most important grocery store attribute, storescape quality and availability the next most important and facilities for childcare the least important. It was also found that socio-demographic factors and shopping behaviour have an impact on the importance of the store attributes.

Originality/value: A comprehensive set of attractiveness and accessibility attributes of grocery stores that can be standardized and used in empirical research is established. The results are valid for the Swedish-European conditions that differ from the conditions in North America where most previous research has been conducted. The results reveal the relative importance grocery-shopping consumers place on controllable attractiveness attributes compared to uncontrollable accessibility attributes as well as the relative importance of the attributes within each category.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015
Keywords
Importance ratings, grocery store attributes, choice, marketing strategy
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90685 (URN)10.1108/IJRDM-12-2012-0112 (DOI)000212070100005 ()
Available from: 2014-06-27 Created: 2014-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Gärling, T., Nordvall, A.-C. & Marell, A. (2015). Who shops groceries where and how?: The relationship between choice of store format and type of grocery shopping. International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, 25(1), 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who shops groceries where and how?: The relationship between choice of store format and type of grocery shopping
2015 (English)In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the relationship between type of grocery shopping, consumers’ choice of store format and demographic characteristics. By simultaneously observing consumers’ choice of store format and whether they are major or fill-in shopping, we are able to investigate combinations of shopping types and store format than has been done previously. In an Internet survey, a sample of 1,575 Swedish consumers reported how they shop groceries. Statistical analyses were performed to determine what consumer characteristics explain frequency of major versus fill-in shopping and frequency of shopping in supermarkets versus convenience stores. Five different segments of consumers are distinguished on the basis of how they shop (major versus fill-in shopping) and where they shop (supermarkets versus convenience stores): “Planning Suburbans”, “Pedestrians”, “Social Shoppers”,City Dwellers”, and “Flexibles”. These segments differ on various characteristics. The results inform retailers of the characteristics of consumers patronizing their stores, enabling them to change the store attributes to fit consumer needs as well as the needs of new consumers.

Keywords
Grocery shopping, shopping behavior, type of grocery shopping, store format, consumer segment
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90683 (URN)10.1080/09593969.2014.940996 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-06-27 Created: 2014-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Biedenbach, G., Bengtsson, M. & Marell, A. (2013). Brand equity, satisfaction and switching costs: An examination of effects in the B2B setting. In: Book of Abstracts from the 8th Global Brand Conference of Brand, Identity and Corporate Reputation SIG, Academy of Marketing: . Paper presented at 8th Global Brand Conference of Brand, Identity and Corporate Reputation SIG, Academy of Marketing,Catholic University of Portugal, Porto, Portugal, April 3-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brand equity, satisfaction and switching costs: An examination of effects in the B2B setting
2013 (English)In: Book of Abstracts from the 8th Global Brand Conference of Brand, Identity and Corporate Reputation SIG, Academy of Marketing, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of satisfaction and switching costs on the development of brand equity in the B2B setting. The study considers the hierarchical effects between brand awareness, brand associations, perceived quality, and brand loyalty. Furthermore, the conceptual model examines the direct effect of switching costs on satisfaction. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze 632 responses from the CEOs and CFOs of organizations buying auditing and business consultancy services from one of the Big Four auditing companies. The findings demonstrate the significant impact of satisfaction and switching costs on B2B brand equity.

Keywords
brand equity, satisfaction, switching costs, business-to-business, professional services
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-68499 (URN)
Conference
8th Global Brand Conference of Brand, Identity and Corporate Reputation SIG, Academy of Marketing,Catholic University of Portugal, Porto, Portugal, April 3-5
Available from: 2013-04-22 Created: 2013-04-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Gärling, T. & Marell, A. (2013). Consumers´ satisfaction with grocery shopping in supermarkets and convenience stores. International Journal of Sales, Retailing and Marketing, 2(4), 72-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumers´ satisfaction with grocery shopping in supermarkets and convenience stores
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Sales, Retailing and Marketing, ISSN 2045-810X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 72-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we ask whether there are differences in which attributes are important for satisfaction with grocery shopping in supermarkets compared to convenience stores. We also examine whether accessibility attributes and attractiveness attributes have different impacts on satisfaction depending on consumer characteristics and shopping behaviour in different store formats. The results show a higher overall satisfaction with supermarkets than convenience stores, and within these store formats a higher satisfaction with the chosen store format. This study has increased understanding of the differences between supermarkets and convenience stores with respect to how these store formats makes consumers satisfied depending on the way they do their shopping.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Access Press UK, 2013
Keywords
Satisfaction, Grocery shopping, Store attributes, Store format
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-84844 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, J., Biedenbach, G. & Marell, A. (2012). Perception of opportunities from an infrastructure investment: investigating the effects of institutional thickness, innovativeness and local embeddedness. In: Book of Abstracts, RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB.. Paper presented at RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB, EMLYON Business School, Lyon, France, November 22-23..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception of opportunities from an infrastructure investment: investigating the effects of institutional thickness, innovativeness and local embeddedness
2012 (English)In: Book of Abstracts, RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB., 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The main purpose of this paper is to explore organizations’ perception of opportunities as a consequence of an infrastructure investment. More specifically, the study investigates the effects of organizations’ perception of institutional thickness, innovativeness, and local embeddedness on perception of opportunities. The study reports on investments made in a new railway in a Swedish peripheral region. The sample included organizations from different economic sectors located in seven selected municipalities. The data was analyzed by using structural equation modeling. The results indicate that activities supporting institutional thickness have a positive effect on perception of opportunities. In addition, organizations characterized by high levels of innovativeness and local embeddedness are more likely to perceive positively opportunities arising from an infrastructure investment.

Keywords
Perception of opportunities, institutional thickness, innovativeness, local embeddedness, infrastructure investment
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61830 (URN)
Conference
RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB, EMLYON Business School, Lyon, France, November 22-23.
Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, T., Marell, A. & Gärling, T. (2012). The mediating effect of value orientation on the relationship between socio-demographic factors and environmental concern in Swedish tourists’ vacation choices. Journal of Ecotourism, 11(1), 16-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mediating effect of value orientation on the relationship between socio-demographic factors and environmental concern in Swedish tourists’ vacation choices
2012 (English)In: Journal of Ecotourism, ISSN 1472-4049, E-ISSN 1747-7638, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A survey of 681 Swedish tourists was conducted to examine how tourists’ value orientation mediates the relationships between socio-demographic factors and environmental concern (EC) in six specific vacation choices. Overall, the results showed that sex, age, education, and income have an effect on EC in choice of destination, time of departure, activity, travel mode, accommodation, and length of trip. Value orientation fully and partially mediated these effects of socio-demographic factors. The partial mediation implies that the socio-demographic factors also have direct effects on ECs. It was further concluded that each vacation choice should be examined separately since both the effect of socio-demographic factors on EC and the mediating effect of value orientation differ depending on which vacation choice the respondent is considering.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Clevedon: Channell View Publications, 2012
Keywords
vacation choices; environmental concern; value orientation; sociodemographic factors
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49299 (URN)10.1080/14724049.2011.626859 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-11-07 Created: 2011-11-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Jansson, J., Marell, A. & Nordlund, A. (2011). Encouraging consumer curtailment behaviour and eco-innovation adoption: detailing the marketing challenge (1ed.). In: Clare D'Souza, Mehdi Taghian, Michael Jay Polonsky (Ed.), Readings and cases in sustainable marketing: a strategic approach to social responsibility (pp. 257-272). Melbourne: Tilde University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Encouraging consumer curtailment behaviour and eco-innovation adoption: detailing the marketing challenge
2011 (English)In: Readings and cases in sustainable marketing: a strategic approach to social responsibility / [ed] Clare D'Souza, Mehdi Taghian, Michael Jay Polonsky, Melbourne: Tilde University Press , 2011, 1, p. 257-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Chapter 7: Much research on consumer environmentally significant behaviours has focused on behaviours that reduce environmental harm, such as saving energy and water. Although determinants of curtailment behaviours are important to understand, for environmental reasons it is also vital to understand the factors that drive or hinder consumers to adopt innovations that are less harmful for the environment, i.e. eco-innovations. In this chapter we discuss two types of consumer behaviours as part of the solution to environmental sustainability issues and detail the marketing challenge in encouraging consumers to adopt such behaviours. We arrive at the marketing challenge matrix where determinants of adoption and non-adoption of curtailment behaviours and eco-innovations is illustrated. The matrix proposes different ways to encourage wider adoption of these behaviours. Since drivers are both similar and different for curtailment behaviours and eco-innovation adoption, but the overall goal is similar, an understanding of these factors and how to handle them in marketing efforts will contribute in the ongoing attempts at achieving environmental sustainability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne: Tilde University Press, 2011 Edition: 1
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47824 (URN)978-0-7346-1085-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
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