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Ericson, Lars
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Bidleman, T. F., Andersson, A., Brugel, S., Ericson, L., Haglund, P., Kupryianchyk, D., . . . Tysklind, M. (2019). Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions. Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, 881-892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bromoanisoles and Methoxylated Bromodiphenyl Ethers in Macroalgae from Nordic Coastal Regions
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, p. 881-892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine macroalgae are used worldwide for human consumption, animal feed, cosmetics and agriculture. In addition to beneficial nutrients, macroalgae contain halogenated natural products (HNPs), some of which have toxic properties similar to those of well-known anthropogenic contaminants. Sixteen species of red, green and brown macroalgae were collected in 2017–2018 from coastal waters of the northern Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic and Norway Atlantic, and analyzed for bromoanisoles (BAs) and methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers (MeO-BDEs). Target compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (GC-LRMS), with qualitative confirmation in selected species by GC-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Quantified compounds were 2,4-diBA, 2,4,6-triBA, 2′-MeO-BDE68, 6-MeO-BDE47, and two tribromo-MeO-BDEs and one tetrabromo-MeO-BDE with unknown bromine substituent positions. Semiquantitative results for pentabromo-MeO-BDEs were also obtained for a few species by GC-HRMS. Three extraction methods were compared; soaking in methanol, soaking in methanol–dichloromethane, and blending with mixed solvents. Extraction yields of BAs did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) with the three methods and the two soaking methods gave equivalent yields of MeO-BDEs. Extraction efficiencies of MeO-BDEs were significantly lower using the blend method (p < 0.05). For reasons of simplicity and efficiency, the soaking methods are preferred. Concentrations varied by orders of magnitude among species: ∑2BAs 57 to 57 700 and ∑5MeO-BDEs < 10 to 476 pg g−1 wet weight (ww). Macroalgae standing out with ∑2BAs >1000 pg g−1 ww were Ascophyllum nodosumCeramium tenuicorneCeramium virgatumFucus radicansFucus serratusFucus vesiculosusSaccharina latissimaLaminaria digitata, and Acrosiphonia/Spongomorpha sp. Species A. nodosumC. tenuicorneChara virgataF. radicans and F. vesiculosus (Sweden Atlantic only) had ∑5MeO-BDEs >100 pg g−1ww. Profiles of individual compounds showed distinct differences among species and locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
bromoanisoles, methoxylated bromodiphenyl ethers, halogenated natural products, macroalgae, Baltic Sea, Sweden Atlantic, Norway Atlantic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158517 (URN)10.1039/C9EM00042A (DOI)000468787800009 ()31032511 (PubMedID)
Projects
EcoChange
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Zhan, J., Ericson, L. & Burdon, J. J. (2018). Climate change accelerates local disease extinction rates in a long-term wild host-pathogen association. Global Change Biology, 24(8), 3526-3536
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change accelerates local disease extinction rates in a long-term wild host-pathogen association
2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3526-3536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pathogens are a significant component of all plant communities. In recent years, the potential for existing and emerging pathogens of agricultural crops to cause increased yield losses as a consequence of changing climatic patterns has raised considerable concern. In contrast, the response of naturally occurring, endemic pathogens to a warming climate has received little attention. Here, we report on the impact of a signature variable of global climate change - increasing temperature - on the long-term epidemiology of a natural host-pathogen association involving the rust pathogen Triphragmium ulmariae and its host plant Filipendula ulmaria. In a host-pathogen metapopulation involving approximately 230 host populations growing on an archipelago of islands in the Gulf of Bothnia we assessed changes in host population size and pathogen epidemiological measures over a 25-year period. We show how the incidence of disease and its severity declines over that period and most importantly demonstrate a positive association between a long-term trend of increasing extinction rates in individual pathogen populations of the metapopulation and increasing temperature. Our results are highly suggestive that changing climatic patterns, particularly mean monthly growing season (April-November) temperature, are markedly influencing the epidemiology of plant disease in this host-pathogen association. Given the important role plant pathogens have in shaping the structure of communities, changes in the epidemiology of pathogens have potentially far-reaching impacts on ecological and evolutionary processes. For these reasons, it is essential to increase understanding of pathogen epidemiology, its response to warming, and to invoke these responses in forecasts for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
climate change, epidemiology, extinction, Filipendula ulmaria, longitudinal study, metapopulation, rust, spatial effects, temperature, Triphragmium ulmariae
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150649 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14111 (DOI)000437284700022 ()29485725 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044427233 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Ericson, L., Mueller, W. J. & Burdon, J. J. (2017). 28-year temporal sequence of epidemic dynamics in a natural rust-host plant metapopulation. Journal of Ecology, 105(3), 701-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>28-year temporal sequence of epidemic dynamics in a natural rust-host plant metapopulation
2017 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 701-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. A long-term study of disease dynamics caused by the rust Uromyces valerianae in 31 discrete populations of Valeriana salina provides a rare opportunity to explore extended temporal patterns in the epidemiology of a natural host-pathogen metapopulation. 2. Over a 28-year period, pathogen population dynamics varied across the metapopulation with disease incidence (presence/absence), prevalence (% plants infected) and severity (% leaf area covered by lesions) all showing strong population and year effects, indicative of heterogeneity among years and host populations in the suitability of conditions for the pathogen. 3. Disease incidence within individual host populations was significantly affected by host population size, disease prevalence the previous year and the proximity of neighbouring populations infected in the current year. After accounting for these variables there was still a marked temporal component with winter sea level having a significant effect; as did summer rainfall in the second part of the study period (1997-2011). 4. Disease prevalence was also effected by host population size and disease prevalence in the previous year. However, it was less affected by spatial aspects of disease spread than was disease incidence. Winter sea level and June rainfall significantly affected disease prevalence. 5. Assessment of disease impact on plant performance found strong variation in disease severity associated with the aspect and positioning of host populations. Plants growing in lower disease environments produced significantly more seeds than those growing in high disease sites. 6. Significant variation in reaction to infection by U. valerianae was detected among plants within four populations and between these different populations. 7. Synthesis. The epidemiology of Uromyces valerianae was highly influenced by host population size, previous disease and distance. After accounting for these factors, there was a clear temporal signal of change in disease incidence linked to winter sea level and summer rainfall. These patterns reinforce the importance of considering interactions in multiple populations over long periods of time in order to obtain a clear picture of the variability in disease-induced selection pressures across time and space. The behaviour of the pathogen fitted that predicted for a metapopulation with considerable asynchrony in epidemiological patterns among demes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
asynchrony, epidemiology, fungal pathogen, host-pathogen interactions, metapopulation, rust, time ries
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136193 (URN)10.1111/1365-2745.12720 (DOI)000400594500014 ()
Available from: 2017-07-07 Created: 2017-07-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Weber, D., Egan, P. A., Ericson, L. E., Muola, A. & Stenberg, J. A. (2017). The Effect of Plant Resistance on Biological Control of Insect Pests. In: Mason, PG Gillespie, DR Vincent, C (Ed.), Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods: . Paper presented at Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods, Langkawi, Malaysia, September 11-15, 2017 (pp. 278-280). CABI Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Plant Resistance on Biological Control of Insect Pests
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods / [ed] Mason, PG Gillespie, DR Vincent, C, CABI Publishing, 2017, p. 278-280Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CABI Publishing, 2017
National Category
Zoology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163252 (URN)10.1079/9781786394118.0278 (DOI)000461868100089 ()
Conference
Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods, Langkawi, Malaysia, September 11-15, 2017
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-24Bibliographically approved
Fors, L., Markus, R., Theopold, U., Ericson, L. & Hambäck, P. A. (2016). Geographic variation and trade-offs in parasitoid virulence. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85(6), 1595-1604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geographic variation and trade-offs in parasitoid virulence
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 1595-1604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Host-parasitoid systems are characterized by a continuous development of new defence strategies in hosts and counter-defence mechanisms in parasitoids. This co-evolutionary arms race makes host-parasitoid systems excellent for understanding trade-offs in host use caused by evolutionary changes in host immune responses and parasitoid virulence. However, knowledge obtained from natural host-parasitoid systems on such trade-offs is still limited.

2. In this study, the aim was to examine trade-offs in parasitoid virulence in Asecodes parviclava (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) when attacking three closely related beetles: Galerucella pusilla, Galerucella calmariensis and Galerucella tenella (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). A second aim was to examine whether geographic variation in parasitoid infectivity or host immune response could explain differences in parasitism rate between northern and southern sites.

3. More specifically, we wanted to examine whether the capacity to infect host larvae differed depending on the previous host species of the parasitoids and if such differences were connected to differences in the induction of host immune systems. This was achieved by combining controlled parasitism experiments with cytological studies of infected larvae.

4. Our results reveal that parasitism success in A. parviclava differs both depending on previous and current host species, with a higher virulence when attacking larvae of the same species as the previous host. Virulence was in general high for parasitoids from G. pusilla and low for parasitoids from G. calmariensis. At the same time, G. pusilla larvae had the strongest immune response and G. calmariensis the weakest. These observations were linked to changes in the larval hemocyte composition, showing changes in cell types important for the encapsulation process in individuals infected by more or less virulent parasitoids.

5. These findings suggest ongoing evolution in parasitoid virulence and host immune response, making the system a strong candidate for further studies on host race formation and speciation.

Keywords
Asecodes, cellular defence, ecological immunology, Galerucella, host-parasitoid interactions, host- thogen evolution
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128966 (URN)10.1111/1365-2656.12579 (DOI)000388354200018 ()27476800 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lehndal, L., Hambäck, P. A., Ericson, L. & Ågren, J. (2016). Herbivory strongly influences among-population variation in reproductive output of Lythrum salicaria in its native range. Oecologia, 180(4), 1159-1171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Herbivory strongly influences among-population variation in reproductive output of Lythrum salicaria in its native range
2016 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 180, no 4, p. 1159-1171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Herbivory can negatively affect several components of plant reproduction. Yet, because of a lack of experimental studies involving multiple populations, the extent to which differences in herbivory contribute to among-population variation in plant reproductive success is poorly known. We experimentally determined the effects of insect herbivory on reproductive output in nine natural populations of the perennial herb Lythrum salicaria along a disturbance gradient in an archipelago in northern Sweden, and we quantified among-population differentiation in resistance to herbivory in a common-garden experiment in the same area. The intensity of leaf herbivory varied > 500-fold and mean female reproductive success > 400-fold among the study populations. The intensity of herbivory was lowest in populations subject to strong disturbance from ice and wave action. Experimental removal of insect herbivores showed that the effect of herbivory on female reproductive success was correlated with the intensity of herbivory and that differences in insect herbivory could explain much of the among-population variation in the proportion of plants flowering and seed production. Population differentiation in resistance to herbivory was limited. The results demonstrate that the intensity of herbivory is a major determinant of flowering and seed output in L. salicaria, but that differences in herbivory are not associated with differences in plant resistance at the spatial scale examined. They further suggest that the physical disturbance regime may strongly influence the performance and abundance of perennial herbs and patterns of selection not only because of its effect on interspecific competition, but also because of effects on interactions with specialized herbivores.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2016
Keywords
Disturbance gradient, Flowering, Plant-herbivore interactions, Plant resistance, Seed production
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119649 (URN)10.1007/s00442-015-3520-2 (DOI)000373186100022 ()26678991 (PubMedID)
Note

Errata Oecologia (2016) 180(4), pp 1173-1174 DOI:10.1007/s00442-016-3570-0

Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, J. A. & Ericson, L. (2015). Raspberry inflicts associational susceptibility to meadowsweet in a complex food web. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 157(1), 68-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Raspberry inflicts associational susceptibility to meadowsweet in a complex food web
2015 (English)In: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, ISSN 0013-8703, E-ISSN 1570-7458, Vol. 157, no 1, p. 68-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Meadowsweet [Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim. (Rosaceae)] has previously been reported to enjoy associational resistance in mixed populations with purple loosestrife [Lythrum salicaria L. (Lythraceae)] due to a shared hymenopteran parasitoid that provides top-down control of herbivory. Here, we report that meadowsweet suffers associational susceptibility in mixed populations with raspberry [Rubus idaeus L. (Rosaceae)] due to a shared herbivore, the raspberry flea beetle [Batophila rubi (Paykull) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)]. Close to raspberry (less than 0.5 m), herbivory on meadowsweet often reached 20-25%, whereas further away (1.5-2 m) herbivory was almost always 0%. We especially highlight the different scales at which the opposing associational effects occur. The shared parasitoid forages throughout entire populations, making the level of population the focal scale of the associational resistance. The shared herbivore, however, spills over from raspberry to neighboring meadowsweets only, making the distance to individual raspberry plants the focal scale for associational susceptibility for meadowsweet. We conclude that different co-occurring plant species can mediate opposing associational effects on a focal host plant by altering the abundance and composition of herbivores and parasitoids, respectively, resulting in multiple selection layers to the geographic mosaic of herbivory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
associational resistance, apparent competition, spillover, herbivory, spatial scale, Filipendula ulmaria, bus idaeus, Batophila rubi, Skeppsvik archipelago, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae
National Category
Ecology Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111149 (URN)10.1111/eea.12339 (DOI)000362989300008 ()
Available from: 2015-11-12 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Burdon, J., Ericson, L. E. & Thrall, P. (2014). Emerging plant diseases (2ed.). In: Neal K. Van Alfen (Ed.), Encyclopedia of agriculture and food systems: volume 3 (pp. 59-67). San Diego: Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emerging plant diseases
2014 (English)In: Encyclopedia of agriculture and food systems: volume 3 / [ed] Neal K. Van Alfen, San Diego: Academic Press, 2014, 2, p. 59-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Diego: Academic Press, 2014 Edition: 2
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98698 (URN)978-0-444-52512-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-27 Created: 2015-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hamback, P. A., Weingartner, E., Ericson, L., Fors, L., Cassel-Lundhagen, A., Stenberg, J. A. & Bergsten, J. (2013). Bayesian species delimitation reveals generalist and specialist parasitic wasps on Galerucella beetles (Chrysomelidae): sorting by herbivore or plant host. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 13, 92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bayesian species delimitation reveals generalist and specialist parasitic wasps on Galerucella beetles (Chrysomelidae): sorting by herbivore or plant host
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2013 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 13, p. 92-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

To understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of species interactions in food webs necessitates that interactions are properly identified. Genetic analyses suggest that many supposedly generalist parasitoid species should rather be defined as multiple species with a more narrow diet, reducing the probability that such species may mediate indirect interactions such as apparent competition among hosts. Recent studies showed that the parasitoid Asecodes lucens mediate apparent competition between two hosts, Galerucella tenella and G. calmariensis, affecting both interaction strengths and evolutionary feedbacks. The same parasitoid was also recorded from other species in the genus Galerucella, suggesting that similar indirect effects may also occur for other species pairs.

Methods:

To explore the possibility of such interactions, we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers to resolve the phylogeny of both host and parasitoid and to test the number of parasitoid species involved. We thus collected 139 Galerucella larvae from 8 host plant species and sequenced 31 adult beetle and 108 parasitoid individuals.

Results:

The analysis of the Galerucella data, that also included sequences from previous studies, verified the five species previously documented as reciprocally monophyletic, but the Bayesian species delimitation for A. lucens suggested 3-4 cryptic taxa with a more specialised host use than previously suggested. The gene data analyzed under the multispecies coalescent model allowed us to reconstruct the species tree phylogeny for both host and parasitoid and we found a fully congruent coevolutionary pattern suggesting that parasitoid speciation followed upon host speciation.

Conclusion:

Using multilocus sequence data in a Bayesian species delimitation analysis we propose that hymenopteran parasitoids of the genus Asecodes that infest Galerucella larvae constitute at least three species with narrow diet breath. The evolution of parasitoid Asecodes and host Galerucella show a fully congruent coevolutionary pattern. This finding strengthens the hypothesis that the parasitoid in host search uses cues of the host rather than more general cues of both host and plant.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-74522 (URN)10.1186/1471-2148-13-92 (DOI)000319297500001 ()
Available from: 2013-09-06 Created: 2013-07-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Olofsson, J., te Beest, M. & Ericson, L. (2013). Complex biotic interactions drive long-term vegetation dynamics in a subarctic ecosystem. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 368(1624)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complex biotic interactions drive long-term vegetation dynamics in a subarctic ecosystem
2013 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 368, no 1624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predicting impacts of global warming requires understanding of the extent to which plant biomass and production are controlled by bottom-up and top-down drivers. By annually monitoring community composition in grazed control plots and herbivore-free exclosures at an Arctic location for 15 years, we detected multiple biotic interactions. Regular rodent cycles acted as pulses driving synchronous fluctuations in the biomass of field-layer vegetation; reindeer influenced the biomass of taller shrubs, and the abundance of plant pathogenic fungi increased when densities of their host plants increased in exclosures. Two outbreaks of geometrid moths occurred during the study period, with contrasting effects on the field layer: one in 2004 had marginal effects, while one in 2012 severely reduced biomass in the control plots and eliminated biomass that had accumulated over 15 years in the exclosures. The latter was followed by a dramatic decline of the dominant understory dwarf-shrub Empetrum hermaphroditum, driven by an interaction between moth herbivory on top buds and leaves, and increased disease severity of a pathogenic fungus. We show that the climate has important direct and indirect effects on all these biotic interactions. We conclude that long time series are essential to identify key biotic interactions in ecosystems, since their importance will be influenced by climatic conditions, and that manipulative treatments are needed in order to obtain the mechanistic understanding needed for robust predictions of future ecosystem changes and their feedback effects.

Keywords
plant community composition, herbivory, voles, lemmings, reindeer, moth
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79221 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2012.0486 (DOI)000321565600008 ()
Available from: 2013-09-16 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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