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Grip, H., Nilsson, K. G., Häger, C. G., Lundström, R. & Öhberg, F. (2019). Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors. Sensors, 19(14), Article ID 3240.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the Femoral Head Size in Hip Arthroplasty Influence Lower Body Movements during Squats, Gait and Stair Walking?: A Clinical Pilot Study Based on Wearable Motion Sensors
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2019 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 14, article id 3240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A hip prosthesis design with larger femoral head size may improve functional outcomes compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA) design. Our aim was to compare the range of motion (RoM) in lower body joints during squats, gait and stair walking using a wearable movement analysis system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) in three age-matched male groups: 6 males with a conventional THA (THAC), 9 with a large femoral head (LFH) design, and 8 hip- and knee-asymptomatic controls (CTRL). We hypothesized that the LFH design would allow a greater hip RoM, providing movement patterns more like CTRL, and a larger side difference in hip RoM in THAC when compared to LFH and controls. IMUs were attached to the pelvis, thighs and shanks during five trials of squats, gait, and stair ascending/descending performed at self-selected speed. THAC and LFH participants completed the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS). The results showed a larger hip RoM during squats in LFH compared to THAC. Side differences in LFH and THAC groups (operated vs. non-operated side) indicated that movement function was not fully recovered in either group, further corroborated by non-maximal mean HOOS scores (LFH: 83 +/- 13, THAC: 84 +/- 19 groups, vs. normal function 100). The IMU system may have the potential to enhance clinical movement evaluations as an adjunct to clinical scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
MEMS, gyroscopes, accelerometers, total hip arthroplasty, movement analysis
National Category
Orthopaedics Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162882 (URN)10.3390/s19143240 (DOI)000479160300207 ()31340548 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
Hansson Mild, K., Lundström, R. & Wilén, J. (2019). Non-Ionizing Radiation in Swedish Health CareExposure and Safety Aspects. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(7), Article ID 1186.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-Ionizing Radiation in Swedish Health CareExposure and Safety Aspects
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 7, article id 1186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of the study was to identify and describe methods using non-ionizing radiation (NIR) such as electromagnetic fields (EMF) and optical radiation in Swedish health care. By examining anticipated exposure levels and by identifying possible health hazards we also aimed to recognize knowledge gaps in the field. NIR is mainly used in health care for diagnosis and therapy. Three applications were identified where acute effects cannot be ruled out: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrosurgery. When using optical radiation, such as class 3 and 4 lasers for therapy or surgical procedures and ultra-violet light for therapy, acute effects such as unintentional burns, photo reactions, erythema and effects on the eyes need to be avoided. There is a need for more knowledge regarding long-term effects of MRI as well as on the combination of different NIR exposures. Based on literature and after consulting staff we conclude that the health care professionals' knowledge about the risks and safety measures should be improved and that there is a need for clear, evidence-based information from reliable sources, and it should be obvious to the user which source to address.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
NIR, health care, exposure, safety, EMF, MRI, TMS, UV, Laser
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159074 (URN)10.3390/ijerph16071186 (DOI)000465595800099 ()30987016 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, D., Wahlström, J., Burström, L., Hagberg, M., Lundström, R., Pettersson, H. & Nilsson, T. (2018). Can sensation of cold hands predict Raynaud’s phenomenon or paresthesia?. Occupational Medicine, 68(5), 314-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can sensation of cold hands predict Raynaud’s phenomenon or paresthesia?
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2018 (English)In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 314-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Raynaud's phenomenon and neurosensory symptoms are common after hand-arm vibration exposure. Knowledge of early signs of vibration injuries is needed. Aims: To investigate the risk of developing Raynaud's phenomenon and paraesthesia in relation to sensation of cold hands in a cohort of male employees at an engineering plant. Methods: We followed a cohort of male manual and office workers at an engineering plant in Sweden for 21 years. At baseline (1987 and 1992) and each follow-up (1992, 1997, 2002, 2008), we assessed sensation of cold, Raynaud's phenomenon and paraesthesia in the hands using questionnaires and measured vibration exposure. We calculated risk estimates with univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses and adjusted for vibration exposure and tobacco usage. Results: There were 241 study participants. During the study period, 21 individuals developed Raynaud's phenomenon and 43 developed paraesthesia. When adjusting the risk of developing Raynaud's phenomenon for vibration exposure and tobacco use, the odds ratios were between 6.0 and 6.3 (95% CI 2.2-17.0). We observed no increased risk for paraesthesia in relation to a sensation of cold hands. Conclusions: A sensation of cold hands was a risk factor for Raynaud's phenomenon. At the individual level, reporting a sensation of cold hands did not appear to be useful information to predict future development of Raynaud's phenomenon given a weak to moderate predictive value. For paraesthesia, the sensation of cold was not a risk factor and there was no predictive value at the individual level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Hand-arm vibration, hand-arm vibration syndrome, Raynaud's phenomenon, paresthesia, sensation of cold
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141012 (URN)10.1093/occmed/kqy053 (DOI)000439653500005 ()
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-10-20 Created: 2017-10-20 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, T., Öhberg, F., Lundström, R., Lindroos, O., Häger, C., Neely, G. & Rehn, B. (2018). Double-sided Mechanical Shocks Provoke Larger Seated Postural Reactions Compared to Single-Sided Mechanical Shocks. Spine, 43(8), E482-E487
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Double-sided Mechanical Shocks Provoke Larger Seated Postural Reactions Compared to Single-Sided Mechanical Shocks
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2018 (English)In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 43, no 8, p. E482-E487Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY DESIGN: Human volunteers were exposed experimentally to single-sided mechanical shocks (SSMS) and double-sided mechanical shocks (DSMS) while seated.

OBJECTIVE: To describe and contrast seated postural reactions due to SSMS or DSMS in healthy male adults.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Mechanical shocks to the body, caused when driving on irregular terrain, are suggested to be hazardous to the spine and may be associated with the reported musculoskeletal pain of the back and neck among professional drivers. However, very little is known about the characteristics of seated postural reactions and the biomechanical effects caused by mechanical shocks.

METHODS: Twenty healthy male subjects (18-43 years old) were exposed while seated to 5 SSMS and 15 DSMS in lateral directions. The second acceleration in the DSMS was in the opposite direction to the first acceleration and was either fast, medium or slow depending on the speed of direction change. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded in muscles of the upper neck, trapezius, erector spinae and external oblique while kinematics were recorded with inertial sensors placed at the neck, trunk and pelvis. Muscle activity was normalized to maximum voluntary contractions (MVC).

RESULTS: The EMG amplitudes were significantly higher (0.6-1%; p < 0.001) for the fast DSMS compared to all other shocks. Range of motion (ROM) of the neck and trunk was greater during the DSMS compared to the SSMS. Evoked muscle activity was less than 2% MVC in the trapezius, less than 10% MVC in the erector spinae and upper neck while the activity exceeded 10% MVC in the external oblique muscles.

CONCLUSION: Fast DSMS in lateral directions appear more demanding compared to SSMS, demonstrating augmented seated postural reactions. However, the present mechanical shocks employed did not seem to induce postural reactions with regard to ROM or muscle activity of a magnitude likely to cause musculoskeletal overload.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144712 (URN)10.1097/BRS.0000000000002396 (DOI)000440520600008 ()28858181 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R., Baloch, A. N., Hagberg, M., Nilsson, T. & Gerhardsson, L. (2018). Long-term effect of hand-arm vibration on thermotactile perception thresholds. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 13, Article ID 19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term effect of hand-arm vibration on thermotactile perception thresholds
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, ISSN 1745-6673, E-ISSN 1745-6673, Vol. 13, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Occupational exposure to hand-transmitted vibration (HTV) is known to cause neurological symptoms such as numbness, reduced manual dexterity, grip strength and sensory perception. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to compare thermotactile perception thresholds for cold (TPTC) and warmth (TPTW) among vibration exposed manual workers and unexposed white collar workers during a follow-up period of 16 years to elucidate if long-term vibration exposure is related to a change in TPT over time. Methods: The study group consisted of male workers at a production workshop at which some of them were exposed to HTV. They were investigated in 1992 and followed-up in 2008. All participants were physically examined and performed TPT bilaterally at the middle and distal phalanges of the second finger. Two different vibration exposure dosages were calculated for each individual, i.e. the individual cumulative lifetime dose (mh/s2) or a lifetime 8-h equivalent daily exposure (m/s(2)). Results: A significant mean threshold difference was found for all subjects of about 4-5 degrees C and 1-2 degrees C in TPTW and TPTC, respectively, between follow-up and baseline. No significant mean difference in TPTC between vibration exposed and non-exposed workers at each occasion could be stated to exist. For TPTW a small but significant difference was found for the right index finger only. Age was strongly related to thermotactile perception threshold. The 8-h equivalent exposure level (A (8)) dropped from about 1.3 m/s2 in 1992 to about 0.7 m/s(2) in 2008. Conclusions: A lifetime 8-h equivalent daily exposure to hand-transmitted vibration less than 1.3 m/s(2) does not have a significant effect on thermotactile perception. Age, however, has a significant impact on the change of temperature perception thresholds why this covariate has to be considered when using TPT as a tool for health screening.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Hand-arm vibration, Hand-transmitted vibration, Hand, Thermotactile perception
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150776 (URN)10.1186/s12995-018-0201-1 (DOI)000435915300001 ()29977321 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Wilén, J., Hansson Mild, K. & Lundström, R. (2018). Non-Ionising Radiation in Swedish Health Care. Stockholm: Strålsäkerhetsmyndigheten
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-Ionising Radiation in Swedish Health Care
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Bakgrund

Inom sjukvården används alltmera teknik som exponerar patienter för icke-joniserande strålning vid diagnostik och terapi. Ofta används sådan teknik som ett alternativ till och ibland i kombination med metoder som exponerar för joniserande strålning.

Huvudsyftet med studien var att identifiera och beskriva hur icke-joniserande strålning används inom hälso- och sjukvård, samt att undersöka förväntade exponeringsnivåer, identifiera eventuella hälsorisker och identifiera kunskapsluckor inom området. Icke-joniserande strålning refererar här till icke-joniserande elektromagnetisk strålning med frekvenser från 0 Hz upp till 3,0 PHz, inkluderande elektromagnetiska fält, optisk strålning och mekaniska vågor såsom ultraljud.

SSM har saknat en samlad kunskap kring de metoder och exponeringsnivåer som använder icke-joniserande strålning inom sjukvården. Bland annat EU:s vetenskapliga råd SCENIHR (har numera bytt namn till SCHEER) har pekat på behovet av forskning om potentiella hälsoeffekter inom detta område. Studien var alltså viktig för att få ett underlag för att bedöma behovet av ytterligare säkerhetsåtgärder inom området, identifiera kunskapsluckor och också för att få ett bättre underlag för att besvara frågor angående säkerhet och eventuella risker.

Resultat

Inga hälsorisker eller allvarliga säkerhetsbrister har identifierats. Däremot är de exponeringsnivåer som används många gånger på en nivå där det finns en tydlig biologisk påverkan och ibland kan även akuta symtom upplevas, detta är dock ofta helt avsiktligt för att få önskad effekt och av övergående natur.

Författarna har identifierat ett behov av att förbättra hälsovårdspersonalens kunskap om risker och säkerhet vid användning av icke-joniserande strålning samt pekar på vikten av tydlighet när det gäller vilken organisation/myndighet som ska tillhandahålla sådan information.

Rapporten indikerar också att ett robust forskningsunderlag för närvarande saknas för att bedöma möjliga långsiktiga hälsorisker med användning av exempelvis MRI, TMS och ultraljud. Den kunskap och forskning som finns tillgänglig tyder dock inte på några betydande hälsorisker med nu aktuella exponeringsnivåer.

Relevans

Rapporten stöder Strålsäkerhetsmyndighetens tidigare uppfattning att de tillämpningar med icke-joniserande strålning som används i sjukvården inte utgör några kända hälsorisker. När metoder som bygger på icke-joniserande strålning ersätter metoder som bygger på joniserande strålning ökar patientsäkerheten, under förutsättning att syftet med undersökningen eller behandlingen uppnås.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Strålsäkerhetsmyndigheten, 2018. p. 94
Series
SSM, ISSN 2000-0456 ; 2017:37
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158401 (URN)
Projects
SSM 2016-498 / 7030054-00
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R., Dahlqvist, H., Hagberg, M. & Nilsson, T. (2018). Vibrotactile and thermal perception and its relation to finger skin thickness. Clinical Neurophysiology Practice, 3, 33-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vibrotactile and thermal perception and its relation to finger skin thickness
2018 (English)In: Clinical Neurophysiology Practice, ISSN 2467-981X, Vol. 3, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Quantitative measurements of vibrotactile and thermotactile perception thresholds (VPT and TPT, respectively) rely on responses from sensory receptors in the skin when mechanical or thermal stimuli are applied to the skin. The objective was to examine if there is a relation between skin thickness (epidermis and dermis) and VPT or TPT.

Methods: Perception thresholds were measured on the volar side of the fingertip on 148 male subjects, out of which 116 were manual workers exposed to hand-transmitted vibration and 32 were white-collar (office) workers. Skin thickness was measured using a high-frequency ultrasonic derma scanner system.

Results: The difference in age, perception thresholds and skin thickness between manual and office workers was small and non-significant except for the perception of cold, which was decreased by vibration exposure. Skin thickness for both subgroups was mean 0.57 mm (range 0.25-0.93 mm). Increased age was associated with decreased perception of warmth and vibration. Lifetime cumulative exposure to vibration, but not age, was associated with decreased perception of cold.

Conclusion: No association (p > .05) was found between finger skin thickness in the range of about 0.1-1 mm and vibration perception threshold for test frequencies from 8 to 500 Hz and thermotactile perception thresholds for warmth and cold. Increasing age was associated with reduced perception of vibration and warmth. Vibration exposure was associated with decreased perception of cold.

Significance: Skin thickness is a factor that may affect the response from sensory receptors, e.g., due to mechanical attenuation and thermal insulation. Thus, to evaluate perception threshold measurements, it is necessary to know if elevated thresholds can be attributed to skin thickness. No previous studies have measured skin thickness as related to vibrotactile and thermotactile perception thresholds. This study showed no association between skin thickness and vibrotactile perception or thermotactile perception.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Perception, Skin thickness, Thermotactile, Threshold, Vibration, Vibrotactile
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152082 (URN)10.1016/j.cnp.2018.01.001 (DOI)30215005 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044675168 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
Stjernbrandt, A., Björ, B., Andersson, M., Burström, L., Liljelind, I., Nilsson, T., . . . Wahlström, J. (2017). Neurovascular hand symptoms in relation to cold exposure in northern Sweden: a population-based study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 90(7), 587-595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurovascular hand symptoms in relation to cold exposure in northern Sweden: a population-based study
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2017 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 90, no 7, p. 587-595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To describe the self-reported ambient cold exposure in northern Sweden and to relate the level of cumulative cold exposure to the occurrence of sensory and vascular hand symptoms. We hypothesize that cold exposure is positively related to reporting such symptoms.

METHODS: A questionnaire about cold exposure and related symptoms was sent out to 35,144 subjects aged 18-70 years and living in northern Sweden.

RESULTS: A total of 12,627 out of 35,144 subjects returned the questionnaire (response rate 35.9%). Subjects living in the rural alpine areas reported more extensive cold exposure both during work and leisure time compared to the urbanized coastal regions. Frostbite in the hands was present in 11.4% of men and 7.1% of women, cold sensitivity was present in 9.7 and 14.4%, and Raynaud's phenomenon was present in 11.0% of men and 14.0% of women. There was a positive association between cumulative cold exposure and neurovascular hand symptoms.

CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that the cold environment in northern Sweden might be an underestimated health risk. Our hypothesis that cold exposure is positively related to reporting of neurovascular hand symptoms was supported by our findings. In addition, such symptoms were common not only in conjunction with an overt cold injury. Our results warrant further study on pathophysiological mechanisms and suggest the need for confirmatory prevalence studies to support national public health planning.

Keywords
Cold exposure, Cold sensitivity, Frostbite, Hand, Raynaud’s phenomenon, Sweden
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133879 (URN)10.1007/s00420-017-1221-3 (DOI)000409295700003 ()28401298 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Boschman, J. S., Noor, A., Lundström, R., Nilsson, T., Sluiter, J. K. & Hagberg, M. (2017). Relationships between work-related factors and musculoskeletal health with current and future work ability among male workers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 90(6), 517-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between work-related factors and musculoskeletal health with current and future work ability among male workers
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2017 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 90, no 6, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The purpose was to increase job-specific knowledge about individual and work-related factors and their relationship with current and future work ability (WA). We studied cross-sectional relationships between mental demands, physical exertion during work, grip strength, musculoskeletal pain in the upper extremities and WA and the relationships between these variables and WA 11 years later.

METHODS: We used a dataset of a prospective cohort study (1997-2008) among employees of an engineering plant (n = 157). The cohort was surveyed by means of tests and written questions on work demands, musculoskeletal health, WA score (WAS; 0-10), and mental and physical WA. Spearman correlation coefficients and logistic regression analysis were used.

RESULTS: Among manual workers, we found weak correlations between grip strength and current and future physical WA. We did not find predictors for future poor WA among the manual workers. Among the office workers, we found that musculoskeletal pain was moderately and negatively related to current WAS and physical WA. More handgrip strength related to better future WAS and physical WA. Musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.67 p < 0.01) and lower handgrip strength (OR 0.91 p < 0.05) predicted future poor WA among office workers.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between musculoskeletal health and work ability depending on occupation. However, the present implies that predicting work ability in the far future based on health surveillance data is rather difficult. Testing the musculoskeletal system (grip strength) and asking workers' about their musculoskeletal health seems relevant when monitoring work ability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Cohort studies, Hand strength, Musculoskeletal disease, Occupational health, Occupations, Work
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134004 (URN)10.1007/s00420-017-1216-0 (DOI)000405016800006 ()28343280 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, T., Öhberg, F., Lundström, R., Lindroos, O., Häger, C., Neely, G. & Rehn, B. (2016). Adaptation of postural reactions in seated positions and influence of head posture when exposed to a single sideway perturbation: relevance for driving on irregular terrain. Journal of Novel Physiotherapy and Physical Rehabilitation, 3(1), 022-029
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation of postural reactions in seated positions and influence of head posture when exposed to a single sideway perturbation: relevance for driving on irregular terrain
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Novel Physiotherapy and Physical Rehabilitation, ISSN 2455-5487, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 022-029Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

 Background and objectives: Mechanical perturbations in seated positions caused by driving on irregular terrain destabilize the driver which, combined with the drivers’ posture, may cause musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate adaptation and the effect of different head postures on seated postural reactions caused by perturbations. 

Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy male participants, aged 18-43 years, were tested on a movable platform delivering 15 sideways perturbations (peak acceleration 13.3 m/s2) while the participants held their head in a neutral or a laterally flexed posture. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally in upper neck, trapezius, erector spinae and external oblique, while kinematics were recorded with inertial sensors for the head, trunk and pelvis. EMG amplitudes, muscle onset latencies and angular displacements in the frontal plane were analyzed. 

Results: In the neutral position, the EMG amplitudes and neck angular displacements significantly decreased by 0.2% and more than 1.6° respectively after repeated perturbations. Muscle onset latencies remained unchanged. During lateral flexion of the head, the EMG amplitudes decreased by 0.5% but the muscular onset latencies increased by more than 9 ms. 

Conclusion: The developed neuromuscular strategy seem to prefer a reduced EMG amplitude. The modest size of the postural reactions during the conditions presented here do not by themselves explain the musculoskeletal disorders found in drivers.

Keywords
Postural balance, Posture, Electromyography, Musculoskeletal pain, Neck muscles
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy; injury prevention
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117165 (URN)10.17352/2455-5487.000031 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Projects
Network: Researcher network on vibration and health (VIBNET) [2013-01809_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4918-9081

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