umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Nyström, M., Hassmén, P., Eriksson Sörman, D., Wigforss, T., Andersson, G. & Carlbring, P. (2019). Are physical activity and sedentary behavior related to depression?. COGENT PSYCHOLOGY, 6(1), Article ID 1633810.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are physical activity and sedentary behavior related to depression?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: COGENT PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1633810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression is an increasing public health concern with rising prevalence. Nevertheless, far from everyone seeks help or receives adequate treatment. Although psychotherapy and antidepressants still constitute the bulk of treatments offered, recent research suggests that physical activity (PA) can be a powerful adjunct therapy while sedentary behavior (SB) is a definite risk factor for developing depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PA, SB and depressive symptoms in a population (n = 962) of applicants for an online treatment study. This study hypothesised that there will be; (1) a positive relationship between SB and depressive symptoms, and (2) a negative relationship between PA and depressive symptoms. In addition we investigated whether the combination of a sedentary lifestyle and physical inactivity increased the risk for depressive symptoms. Finally, we also examined whether gender, age, marital status, educational level, or medication affected the relationship between PA, SB, and depressive symptoms. The results showed a positive correlation between SB and depression. There was, however, no statistically significant support for a negative relation between PA and depressive symptoms. Even though no conclusions about causality can be drawn, our results suggest that high SB, being a woman, being young, not being in a stable relationship, and current or previous medication are risk factors for depression. To be able to determine the causal direction, that is, whether high SB increases the risk for depressive symptoms, or if depressive symptoms increase the likelihood of high SB, further research is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Depression, physical activity, sedentary behavior, online treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161713 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2019.1633810 (DOI)000473610600001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0477Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(269)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, no 269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The notion that the long-term practice of managing two languages is beneficial for the executive control system is an ongoing debate. Criticism have been raised that studies demonstrating a bilingual advantage often suffer from small sample sizes, and do not control for fluid intelligence as a possible confound. Taking those suggested factors into account, focusing on older bilingual age groups and investigating the potential effects of linguistic distances, this study aimed to improve the interpretations of the bilinguals’ advantages. Measures of inhibition (Flanker, Stroop, Simon task) and switching (Number-letter, Color-Shape, Local-global task) were collected in participants in the ages 50-75 years (n = 193). Despite a large study sample, results did not support any beneficial effects related to improve processing costs in executive functioning. Sub-analyses of the two different language groups (Swedish – Finnish / Swedish – English) intended to investigate the effect of linguistic distances did not change this outcome. Future studies exploring the potential long-term term effects of bilingualism would benefit from identifying tests of cognitive control with greater ecological validity and include other measures of cognitive functioning. Language learning interventions may also be a promising tool for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
bilingualism, cognitive control, executive functioning, inhibition, switching, linguistic distance, middle age, old age
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156412 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00269 (DOI)000458281600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Hjärtström, H., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2019). Distraction and facilitation: The impact of emotional sounds in an emoji oddball task. PsyCh Journal, 8(2), 180-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distraction and facilitation: The impact of emotional sounds in an emoji oddball task
2019 (English)In: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0252, E-ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emotional stimuli are argued to capture attention and consume attentional resources differently depending on their emotionalcontent. The present study investigates the impact of the automatic detection of unexpected and to-be-ignored emotional stimuli onhuman behavioral responses, and aims to unravel the differences in distraction between two negative emotional stimuli: sadness and anger.Forty participants (Mage= 25.5 years) performed a visual categorization task where angry and sad emoji faces were presented after eithera standard neutral tone (in 80% of trials) or a deviant emotional sound (tone changing in pitch; sad or angry sound in 10% of trials each)that was to be ignored. Deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., sad sound—sad face) or incongruent (e.g., angry sound—sad face).Although the stimuli presented to the participants were brief and to-be-ignored, results indicate that participants were significantly moredistracted by sad compared to angry stimuli (seen as prolonged response times). Findings are discussed with reference to the nature ofthe two negative emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
attention, deviance distraction, emotion, oddball
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157018 (URN)10.1002/pchj.273 (DOI)000472121200002 ()30793507 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Körning Ljungberg, J. (2019). Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, Article ID 1355.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bilinguals often show a disadvantage in lexical access on verbal fluency tasks wherein the criteria require the production of words from semantic categories. However, the pattern is more heterogeneous for letter (phonemic) fluency wherein the task is to produce words beginning with a given letter. Here, bilinguals often outperform monolinguals. One explanation for this is that phonemic fluency, as compared with semantic fluency, is more greatly underpinned by executive processes and that bilinguals exhibit better performance on phonemic fluency due to better executive functions. In this study, we re-analyzed phonemic fluency data from the Betula study, scoring outputs according to two measures that purportedly reflect executive processes: clustering and switching. Consistent with the notion that bilinguals have superior executive processes and that these can be used to offset a bilingual disadvantage in verbal fluency, bilinguals (35-65 years at baseline) demonstrated greater switching and clustering throughout the 15-year study period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
bilingualism, aging, phonemic fluency, executive function, longitudinal study
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160201 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01355 (DOI)000471303800001 ()31244740 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 1988-0082:17Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, J2001-0682Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Swedish Research Council, 2015-01116Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505
Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Elbe, P., Eriksson Sörman, D., Mellqvist, E., Brändström, J. & Körning-Ljungberg, J. (2019). Predicting attention shifting abilities from self-reported media multitasking. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting attention shifting abilities from self-reported media multitasking
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, ISSN 1069-9384, E-ISSN 1531-5320Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Media multitasking is an increasingly prominent behavior in affluent societies. However, it still needs to be established if simultaneous use of several modes of media content has an influence on higher cognitive functions, such as divided attention. In this study, attention shifting was the primary focus, since switching between tasks is assumed to be necessary for media multitasking. Two tasks, the number–letter and local–global task, were used as measures of switching ability. The cognitive reflections task was included to control for possible effects of intelligence. Results from linear regression analyses showed that higher levels of media multitasking was related to lower switching costs in the two attention-shifting tasks. These findings replicate previous findings suggesting that heavy media multitaskers perform better on select measures of task switching. We suggest two possible explanations for our results: media multitasking may practice skills needed for switching between tasks, or high media multitaskers are choosing this style of technology use due to a dominating personality trait in this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Media, Multitasking, Switching, Executive functions, Attention
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158626 (URN)10.3758/s13423-018-01566-6 (DOI)
Projects
Framgångsrikt åldrande
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-06-24
Nyström, M., Eriksson Sörman, D., Kormi-Nouri, R. & Rönnlund, M. (2019). To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses. Aging & Mental Health, 23(1), 92-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses
2019 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Population aging motivated a focus in contemporary research on factors, e.g. cognitive functioning, that contribute to ‘aging well.’ However, something that has been overlooked is relation between memory functioning, determined by objective tests as well as subjective memory ratings, and subjective well-being (SWB).

Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal (cross-lagged) relationships between episodic memory (both subjective and objective) and SWB.

Method: A total of 586 older individuals (60–90 years) were assessed on multiple measures of the targeted constructs at baseline (Time 1) as part of the Betula cohort study. Five years later (Time 2), 354 of the participants returned for follow-up measurements and were included in cross-lagged panel analyses.

Results: As expected, objective memory and subjective memory showed a pattern of cross-sectional age deficits and a mean level longitudinal decline was observed for objective memory. By contrast, SWB showed stable mean levels both across age and time. No cross-sectional or cross-lagged associations were observed between SWB and objective memory, whereas subjective memory and SWB showed a cross-sectional association.

Conclusion: The results underscore that successful aging is a multifaceted construct with no or only weak associations between the investigated components. However, SWB and rate of change at the individual level should be considered to define successful aging.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Successful aging, episodic memory, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142047 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2017.1394439 (DOI)000461682000013 ()29086589 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Körning Ljungberg, J. & Rönnlund, M. (2018). Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 1872.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective of this study was to investigate reading habits in older adults in relation to level and 15-year changes in verbal fluency and episodic recall. We examined a sample of 1157 participants (55 years at baseline) up to 15 years after the baseline assessment using latent growth curve modeling of cognitive measures with baseline reading frequency (books, weekly magazines) as a predictor of cognitive level (intercept) and rate of change (slope). Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of an early adult g factor in the association between reading habits and cognitive ability in midlife. Frequent reading of books, but not of magazines, was associated with higher levels of verbal fluency and recall but unrelated to rate of longitudinal decline. Subgroup analyses indicated that the g factor in early adulthood predicted reading and cognitive level in midlife and this factor removed the current association between reading habits and level of cognitive ability (both cognitive factors). The results indicate an enduring relationship between book reading and level of cognitive ability across the adult life span and provide little support of the hypothesis that frequent reading protects against latelife cognitive decline. The extent to which book reading promotes cognitive functioning in childhood/youth remains to be demonstrated. Intervention studies may be useful in this regard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
reading habits, cognitive aging, longitudinal analyses, verbal fluency, episodic recall, early adult intelligence
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152931 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01872 (DOI)000445805800001 ()30319520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054073636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Neely, G., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2018). The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task. PLoS ONE, 13(11), Article ID e0207852.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153436 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0207852 (DOI)000450775300049 ()30458043 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Röhlcke, S., Bäcklund, C., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Jonsson, B. (2018). Time on task matters most in video game expertise. PLoS ONE, 13(10), Article ID e0206555.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time on task matters most in video game expertise
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e0206555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we investigated whether working memory capacity (WMC), personality characteristics (grit) and number of matches played (time on task) can predict performance score (matchmaking rating [MMR]) in experienced players of a popular video game called Dota 2. A questionnaire and four online-based cognitive tasks were used to gather the data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to investigate the interrelationships between constructs. The results showed that time on task was the strongest predictor of MMR, and grit also significantly influenced performance. However, WMC did not play a substantial role in predicting performance while playing Dota 2. These results are discussed in relation to sample characteristics and the role of deliberate practice and skill acquisition within the domain of playing Dota 2. Further, we suggest that future research investigates the social aspects of attaining skill, the relationship between personality and performance, and the qualitative aspects of time spent on a task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152930 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0206555 (DOI)000448641200043 ()30372473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055612705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Josefsson, M., Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2017). Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking. PLoS ONE, 12(12), Article ID e0189299.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An ongoing debate surrounds whether bilinguals outperform monolinguals in tests of executive processing. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are long-term (10 year) bilingual advantages in executive processing, as indexed by dual-task performance, in a sample that were 40-65 years at baseline. The bilingual (n = 24) and monolingual (n = 24) participants were matched on age, sex, education, fluid intelligence, and study sample. Participants performed free-recall for a 12-item list in three dual-task settings wherein they sorted cards either during encoding, retrieval, or during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list. Free recall without card sorting was used as a reference to compute dual-task costs. The results showed that bilinguals significantly outperformed monolinguals when they performed card-sorting during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list, the condition that presumably placed the highest demands on executive functioning. However, dual-task costs increased over time for bilinguals relative to monolinguals, a finding that is possibly influenced by retirement age and limited use of second language in the bilingual group.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143465 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0189299 (DOI)000419006200021 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications