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Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Eriksson Sörman, D. (2019). Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning. Frontiers in Psychology, 10(269)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, no 269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The notion that the long-term practice of managing two languages is beneficial for the executive control system is an ongoing debate. Criticism have been raised that studies demonstrating a bilingual advantage often suffer from small sample sizes, and do not control for fluid intelligence as a possible confound. Taking those suggested factors into account, focusing on older bilingual age groups and investigating the potential effects of linguistic distances, this study aimed to improve the interpretations of the bilinguals’ advantages. Measures of inhibition (Flanker, Stroop, Simon task) and switching (Number-letter, Color-Shape, Local-global task) were collected in participants in the ages 50-75 years (n = 193). Despite a large study sample, results did not support any beneficial effects related to improve processing costs in executive functioning. Sub-analyses of the two different language groups (Swedish – Finnish / Swedish – English) intended to investigate the effect of linguistic distances did not change this outcome. Future studies exploring the potential long-term term effects of bilingualism would benefit from identifying tests of cognitive control with greater ecological validity and include other measures of cognitive functioning. Language learning interventions may also be a promising tool for future research.

Keywords
bilingualism, cognitive control, executive functioning, inhibition, switching, linguistic distance, middle age, old age
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156412 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00269 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-14
Eriksson Sörman, D., Körning Ljungberg, J. & Rönnlund, M. (2018). Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 1872.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1872Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective of this study was to investigate reading habits in older adults in relation to level and 15-year changes in verbal fluency and episodic recall. We examined a sample of 1157 participants (55 years at baseline) up to 15 years after the baseline assessment using latent growth curve modeling of cognitive measures with baseline reading frequency (books, weekly magazines) as a predictor of cognitive level (intercept) and rate of change (slope). Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of an early adult g factor in the association between reading habits and cognitive ability in midlife. Frequent reading of books, but not of magazines, was associated with higher levels of verbal fluency and recall but unrelated to rate of longitudinal decline. Subgroup analyses indicated that the g factor in early adulthood predicted reading and cognitive level in midlife and this factor removed the current association between reading habits and level of cognitive ability (both cognitive factors). The results indicate an enduring relationship between book reading and level of cognitive ability across the adult life span and provide little support of the hypothesis that frequent reading protects against latelife cognitive decline. The extent to which book reading promotes cognitive functioning in childhood/youth remains to be demonstrated. Intervention studies may be useful in this regard.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
reading habits, cognitive aging, longitudinal analyses, verbal fluency, episodic recall, early adult intelligence
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152931 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01872 (DOI)000445805800001 ()30319520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054073636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Neely, G., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2018). The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task. PLoS ONE, 13(11), Article ID e0207852.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153436 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0207852 (DOI)000450775300049 ()30458043 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2211-0505Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2014.0205
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Röhlcke, S., Bäcklund, C., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Jonsson, B. (2018). Time on task matters most in video game expertise. PLoS ONE, 13(10), Article ID e0206555.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time on task matters most in video game expertise
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 10, article id e0206555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we investigated whether working memory capacity (WMC), personality characteristics (grit) and number of matches played (time on task) can predict performance score (matchmaking rating [MMR]) in experienced players of a popular video game called Dota 2. A questionnaire and four online-based cognitive tasks were used to gather the data, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to investigate the interrelationships between constructs. The results showed that time on task was the strongest predictor of MMR, and grit also significantly influenced performance. However, WMC did not play a substantial role in predicting performance while playing Dota 2. These results are discussed in relation to sample characteristics and the role of deliberate practice and skill acquisition within the domain of playing Dota 2. Further, we suggest that future research investigates the social aspects of attaining skill, the relationship between personality and performance, and the qualitative aspects of time spent on a task.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152930 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0206555 (DOI)000448641200043 ()30372473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055612705 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Eriksson Sörman, D., Josefsson, M., Marsh, J. E., Hansson, P. & Ljungberg, J. K. (2017). Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking. PLoS ONE, 12(12), Article ID e0189299.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking
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2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An ongoing debate surrounds whether bilinguals outperform monolinguals in tests of executive processing. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are long-term (10 year) bilingual advantages in executive processing, as indexed by dual-task performance, in a sample that were 40-65 years at baseline. The bilingual (n = 24) and monolingual (n = 24) participants were matched on age, sex, education, fluid intelligence, and study sample. Participants performed free-recall for a 12-item list in three dual-task settings wherein they sorted cards either during encoding, retrieval, or during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list. Free recall without card sorting was used as a reference to compute dual-task costs. The results showed that bilinguals significantly outperformed monolinguals when they performed card-sorting during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list, the condition that presumably placed the highest demands on executive functioning. However, dual-task costs increased over time for bilinguals relative to monolinguals, a finding that is possibly influenced by retirement age and limited use of second language in the bilingual group.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143465 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0189299 (DOI)000419006200021 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 345-2003-3883Swedish Research Council, 315-2004-6977Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1782
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sörman Eriksson, D., Rönnlund, M., Sundström, A., Norberg, M. & Nilsson, L.-G. (2017). Social network size and cognitive functioning in middle-aged adults: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations. Journal of Adult Development, 24(2), 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social network size and cognitive functioning in middle-aged adults: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Adult Development, ISSN 1068-0667, E-ISSN 1573-3440, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of the present study was to examine relations between social network size and three cognitive abilities (episodic memory, semantic memory, visuospatial ability) in middle-aged adults. We analyzed cross-sectional data on social network size and cognitive functioning that were available for 804 participants aged 40–60 years. In addition, we examined 5- and 10-year follow-up measurements of cognitive functioning that were available for 604 and 255 participants, respectively. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a positive association between social network size and each of the three cognitive abilities. Baseline network size was positively related to 5-year changes in semantic memory, and to 10-year changes in semantic as well as episodic memory, but was unrelated to changes in visuospatial performance. A minor portion of the sample (n = 131) had 10-year follow-up data on network size. Cross-lagged panel correlations revealed that baseline network size was associated with follow-up measurement in cognitive functioning (episodic memory, semantic memory), whereas baseline cognitive performance was unrelated to future network size. Together, the results demonstrate a small but positive relation between network size and declarative memory abilities, in line with models proposing a cognitive reserve built up by factors such as the increased cognitive stimulation associated with a more extensive social network.

Keywords
Cognition, Longitudinal, Cross-sectional, Social network, Cognitive reserve
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101832 (URN)10.1007/s10804-016-9248-3 (DOI)000399825300001 ()
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2015-04-14 Created: 2015-04-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M., Eriksson Sörman, D., Kormi-Nouri, R. & Rönnlund, M. (2017). To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses.. Aging & Mental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses.
2017 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Successful aging, episodic memory, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142047 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2017.1394439 (DOI)29086589 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2019-02-01
Eriksson Sörman, D., Hansson, P. & Rönnlund, M. (2016). Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors. Psychological Topics, 25(1), 59-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood Pressure Levels and Longitudinal Changes in Relation to Social Network Factors
2016 (English)In: Psychological Topics, ISSN 1332-0742, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social network variables and levels of and longitudinal changes in blood pressure in a middle-aged/older sample. The participants (50-75 years at baseline; n=1097) responded to questions concerning social relationships at baseline and their blood pressure (diastolic, systolic) was measured. Blood pressure levels were reassessed 5, 10, and 15 years later. Latent growth models with responses to questions concerning social relationships as predictors and basic demographic factors (age, sex) as covariates, unexpectedly indicated that a more limited social network (no close friend, few visits, little contact with friends in other ways, not living with someone, and a composite index based on all questions) was associated with significantly lower diastolic blood pressure levels. For systolic blood pressure a similar result was observed for one of the variables (lack of a close friend). In general, these effects diminished over time, as indexed by the positive relationship between several of the social variables and slope. The results were little affected by inclusion of additional covariates (e.g. measures of psychological distress, smoking/alcohol habits, and BMI) suggesting that the origins of this unexpected pattern of findings must probably be sought for in other subjectrelated factors, such as, for example, increased help seeking. Future studies should consider qualitative aspects (e.g. feelings of loneliness, quality of social relationships) in addition to structural aspects to provide a better understanding of these associations.

Keywords
blood pressure, social network, cross-sectional, longitudinal
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120122 (URN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ljungberg K., J., Hjärtström, H. & Sörman, D. (2016). The Impact of Emotional Deviant Sounds on Emoji Faces in a Sustained Attention Task. In: : . Paper presented at 57th Annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, November 17th, Boston, USA. , 21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Emotional Deviant Sounds on Emoji Faces in a Sustained Attention Task
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The involuntary shift of attention to emotional sounds were investigated in a cross-modal oddball task in which participants categorized angry and disappointed emoji faces. Prior to each face, a standard tone was presented (80% of trials) or a deviant “disappointed” or a buzzing “angry” sound (20% of trials). The deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., disappointed sound/disappointed emoji) or incongruent trials (e.g., a disappointed sound/angry emoji). Results showed that the emotional content of the deviant sounds interacted with the processing of the faces, but that the effect was only present in the congruent trials. Participants showed deviance distraction (prolonged response times compared to standard) in the disappointed trials and facilitation (no deviance distraction) in the angry deviant trials. The facilitation (or lack of distraction) caused by the angry deviant sound in the congruent trial may have been a result of an arousal effect due to the processing of threat.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129486 (URN)
Conference
57th Annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, November 17th, Boston, USA
Available from: 2016-12-30 Created: 2016-12-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Nyström, M., Eriksson Sörman, D. & Rönnlund, M. (2015). Is cognitive functioning important for quality in aging?: A five year follow-up study of older adults  . In: Psychonomic Society’s 56th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA, November 19-22 2015: . Paper presented at Psychonomic Society’s 56th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA (pp. 92). Madison, USA: The Psychonomic Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is cognitive functioning important for quality in aging?: A five year follow-up study of older adults  
2015 (English)In: Psychonomic Society’s 56th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA, November 19-22 2015, Madison, USA: The Psychonomic Society , 2015, p. 92-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Madison, USA: The Psychonomic Society, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-120121 (URN)
Conference
Psychonomic Society’s 56th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Available from: 2016-05-09 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07
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