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Boström, P., Haapamäki, M. M., Rutegård, J., Matthiessen, P. & Rutegård, M. (2019). Population‐based cohort study of the impact on postoperative mortality of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer. BJS Open, 3(1), 106-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population‐based cohort study of the impact on postoperative mortality of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer
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2019 (English)In: BJS Open, E-ISSN 2474-9842, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Anastomotic leakage following anterior resection for rectal cancer may result in death. The aim of this study was to yield an updated, population‐based estimate of postoperative mortality and evaluate possible interacting factors.

Methods: This was a retrospective national cohort study of patients who underwent anterior resection between 2007 and 2016. Data were retrieved from a prospectively developed database. Anastomotic leakage constituted exposure, whereas outcome was defined as death within 90 days of surgery. Logistic regression analyses, using directed acyclic graphs to evaluate possible confounders, were performed, including interaction analyses.

Results: Of 6948 patients, 693 (10·0 per cent) experienced anastomotic leakage and 294 (4·2 per cent) underwent reintervention due to leakage. The mortality rate was 1·5 per cent in patients without leakage and 3·9 per cent in those with leakage. In multivariable analysis, leakage was associated with increased mortality only when a reintervention was performed (odds ratio (OR) 5·57, 95 per cent c.i. 3·29 to 9·44). Leaks not necessitating reintervention did not result in increased mortality (OR 0·70, 0·25 to 1·96). There was evidence of interaction between leakage and age on a multiplicative scale (P = 0·007), leading to a substantial mortality increase in elderly patients with leakage.

Conclusion: Anastomotic leakage, in particular severe leakage, led to a significant increase in 90‐day mortality, with a more pronounced risk of death in the elderly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154649 (URN)10.1002/bjs5.50106 (DOI)000457222900012 ()30734021 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Rutegård, M., Boström, P., Haapamäki, M., Matthiessen, P. & Rutegård, J. (2016). Current use of diverting stoma in anterior resection for cancer: population-based cohort study of total and partial mesorectal excision. International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 31(3), 579-585
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current use of diverting stoma in anterior resection for cancer: population-based cohort study of total and partial mesorectal excision
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, ISSN 0179-1958, E-ISSN 1432-1262, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 579-585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose A diverting stoma is commonly used to reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage when performing total mesorectal excision (TME) in anterior resection for rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of fecal diversion in relation to partial mesorectal excision (PME).

Methods A retrospective analysis was undertaken on a national cohort, originally created to study the impact of central arterial ligation on patients with increased cardiovascular risk. Some 741 patients operated with anterior resection for rectal cancer during the years 2007 through 2010 were followed up for 53 months. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of diverting stoma on the risk of anastomotic leakage and permanent stoma, expressed as odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs).

Results The risk of anastomotic leakage was increased in TME surgery when not using a diverting stoma (OR 5.1; 95 % CI 2.2-11.6), while the corresponding risk increase in PME patients was modest (OR 1.8; 95 % CI 0.8-4.0). At study completion or death, 26 and 13 % of TME and PME patients, respectively, had a permanent stoma. A diverting stoma was a statistically significant risk factor for a permanent stoma in PME patients (OR 4.7; 95 % CI 2.5-9.0), while less important in TME patients (OR 1.8; 95 % CI 0.6-5.5).

Conclusion The benefit of a diverting stoma concerning anastomotic leakage in this patient group seems doubtful. Moreover, the diverting stoma itself may contribute to the high rate of permanent stomas.

Keywords
Rectal cancer, Defunctioning stoma, Fecal diversion, Permanent stoma
National Category
Surgery Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118987 (URN)10.1007/s00384-015-2465-6 (DOI)000371400900012 ()26670673 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Boström, P., Haapamaki, M. M., Matthiessen, P., Ljung, R., Rutegård, J. & Rutegård, M. (2015). High arterial ligation and risk of anastomotic leakage in anterior resection for rectal cancer in patients with increased cardiovascular risk. Colorectal Disease, 17(11), 1018-1027
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High arterial ligation and risk of anastomotic leakage in anterior resection for rectal cancer in patients with increased cardiovascular risk
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2015 (English)In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 1018-1027Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Controversy still exists as to whether division of the inferior mesenteric artery close to the aorta influences the risk of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer. This population-based study was carried out to evaluate the independent association between high arterial ligation and anastomotic leakage in patients with increased cardiovascular risk.

Method: All 2673 cases of registered anterior resection for rectal cancer from 2007 to 2010 were identified from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry and cross-referenced with the Prescribed Drugs Registry, rendering a cohort of all patients with increased cardiovascular risk. Operative charts and registered data were reviewed for 722 patients. The association between high tie and anastomotic leakage, as quantified by ORs and 95% CIs, was evaluated in a logistic regression model, with adjustment for confounding, including assessment of interaction.

Results: Symptomatic anastomotic leakage occurred in 12.3% (41/334) of patients in the high tie group and in 10.6% (41/388) in the low tie group. The use of high tie was not independently associated with a higher risk of anastomotic leakage (OR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.61–1.84). In a post-hoc analysis, patients with a history of manifest cardiovascular disease and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score III–IV seemed to be at greater risk (OR = 3.66; 95% CI: 1.04–12.85).

Conclusion: In the present population-based, observational setting, high tie was not independently associated with an increased risk of symptomatic anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer. However, this conclusion may not hold for patients with severe cardiovascular disease.

Keywords
Inferior mesenteric artery, total mesorectal excision, anastomotic insufficiency, neoplasm
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110980 (URN)10.1111/codi.12971 (DOI)000362795400022 ()25851151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4950-2568

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