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BETA
Lindström, Britta
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Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Johansson, C., Lindström, B., Forsgren, L. & Johansson, G. M. (2018). Balance and mobility in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease - a five-year follow-up of a cohort in northern Sweden. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balance and mobility in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease - a five-year follow-up of a cohort in northern Sweden
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The presence of early balance impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease has not been fully investigated.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine balance and mobility, self-perceived unsteadiness, self-reported falls, and effects of medication on balance among patients at their first visit to a neurological clinic and during the ensuing five years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participants were collected from a prospective longitudinal study. One hundred and forty-five patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 31 healthy controls were included. The outcome measures were the Berg Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go, the Postural Stability test and a questionnaire.

RESULTS: At their first visit to the neurological clinic, the patients performed less well on the Berg Balance Scale (p < 0.001, r = 0.36), the Timed Up and Go (p < 0.001, r = 0.32), and the Postural Stability test (p < 0.001, r = 0.35) compared with the controls. In addition, a higher percentage of the patients reported self-perceived unsteadiness (p < 0.001, phi = 0.47). During the ensuing five years, balance and mobility worsened both with and without medication (p < 0.01, r = 0.24-0.37), although with small median differences.

CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed to confirm that minor balance impairments exist even at the time of diagnosis and worsen during the ensuing five years. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Impairments in balance and mobility may occur early in Parkinson's disease, especially in the elderly patients, and seem to worsen during the first five years. There is a need to use sensitive outcome measures and to ask the patients about unsteadiness and falls to detect balance impairment in this cohort. Parkinsonian medication has a limited effect on balance and may preferably be complemented with balance exercises to target balance impairment early in Parkinson's disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Parkinson’s disease, balance, exercise, falls, parkinsonism, postural instability
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155392 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2018.1509240 (DOI)30451551 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-04-05
Larsson, G., Julu, P. O. O., Engerström, I. W., Sandlund, M. & Lindström, B. (2018). Walking on treadmill with Rett syndrome: effects on the autonomic nervous system. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 83, 99-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking on treadmill with Rett syndrome: effects on the autonomic nervous system
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2018 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 83, p. 99-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People with Rett syndrome have deficient central autonomic control, which may interfere with walking. We have limited knowledge regarding the effects of exertion during physical activity in Rett syndrome. The aim was to investigate the autonomic responses during walking on a treadmill in Rett syndrome. Twenty-six females, 12 with Rett syndrome and 14 healthy females were included. All individuals started on the treadmill by standing still, followed by walking slowly with progressive speed until reaching maximum individual speed, which they kept for 6 min. Heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial blood pressures (MAP), cardiac vagal tone (CVT), cardiac sensitivity to baroreflex (CSB), transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen (pO2), carbon dioxide (pCO2), and breathing movements were recorded simultaneously and continuously. Autonomic responses were assessed by MAP, CSB and CVT during walking at 3 and 6 min. The changes in CSB and CVT in people with Rett syndrome compared to controls indicated more arousal, but only when the treadmill was started; as they continued walking, the arousal dropped to control level. People with Rett syndrome exhibited little changes in pCO2 whereas the controls showed increased values during walking. This suggests poor aerobic respiration in people with Rett syndrome during walking. Five people with Rett syndrome had Valsalva type of breathing at rest, three of those had normal breathing while walking on the treadmill while the remaining two started but soon stopped the Valsalva breathing during the walk. Our results show that individuals with Rett syndrome can walk for up to 6 min at their own maximum sustainable speed on a treadmill. Energy production may be low during walking in Rett syndrome, which could cause early tiredness. A treadmill can be used in people with Rett syndrome, but must be introduced slowly and should be individually tailored. We propose that walking promotes regular breathing in Rett syndrome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Autonomic nervous system, Exercise, Treadmill, Valsalva, Energy production, Stamina
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154898 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2018.08.010 (DOI)000452684300011 ()30193160 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Hedlund, M., Lindström, B., Sojka, P., Lundström, R. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2016). Is better preservation of eccentric strength after stroke due to altered prefrontal function?. Neurocase, 22(2), 229-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is better preservation of eccentric strength after stroke due to altered prefrontal function?
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2016 (English)In: Neurocase, ISSN 1355-4794, E-ISSN 1465-3656, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 229-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) is part of a network that exerts inhibitory control over the motor cortex (MC). Recently, we demonstrated that VLPFC was more activated during imagined maximum eccentric than during imagined concentric contractions in healthy participants. This was accompanied with lower activation levels within motor regions during imagined eccentric contractions. The aim was to test a novel hypothesis of an involvement of VLPFC in contraction mode-specific modulation of force. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine differences in VLPFC and motor regions during the concentric and the eccentric phases of imagined maximum contractions in a selected sample of subjects with stroke (n = 4). The subjects were included as they exhibited disturbed modulation of force. The previously demonstrated pattern within VLPFC was evident only on the contralesional hemisphere. On the ipsilesional hemisphere, the recruitment in VLPFC was similar for both modes of contractions. The findings support a hypothesis of the involvement of VLPFC in contraction mode-specific modulation of maximum force production. A disturbance of this system might underlie the lack of contraction mode-specific modulation commonly found among stroke subjects, often expressed as an increased ratio between eccentric and concentric strength.

Keywords
Motor imagery, fMRI, stroke, eccentric, concentric, inhibition
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55461 (URN)10.1080/13554794.2015.1130232 (DOI)000369770400016 ()26750576 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2012-05-16 Created: 2012-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lindström, B., Aronsson, N., Näslund, M. & Wadell, K. (2016). Validity of using elastic bands to measure knee extension strength in older adults. Journal of Novel Physiotherapy and Physical Rehabilitation, 3(1), 16-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validity of using elastic bands to measure knee extension strength in older adults
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Novel Physiotherapy and Physical Rehabilitation, ISSN 2455-5487, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objectives: Maximal strength assessment of knee extensors in older adults using elastic resistance bands have rarely been addressed even though resistance training using elastic bands have shown large effects on muscle strength in this group of people. We therefore aim to determine the validity of maximal knee extension strength assessment using elastic resistance bands in older women and men.

Methods: Twenty-four participants (12 women and 12 men; 61.8 ± 6.0 years; 173.5 ± 10.2 cm; 71.9 ± 15.7 kg) were included. To assess maximal knee extension strength, participants performed one-repetition maximum testing of concentric knee extension using elastic resistance bands as well as a maximal concentric knee extension isokinetic test at 60°/s using a stationary isokinetic dynamometer. Concurrent validity of the two measurement techniques were assed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), Pearson correlations (R), concordance correlations (Rc) and by determining variations on an individual level using 95% limits of agreement (LoA) with isokinetic dynamometry measurement as the reference standard.

Results: Validity analysis showed good to excellent agreement and relationships but wide 95% LoA between elastic one-repetition maximum and isokinetic peak torque for all participants (ICC = 0.88; R = 0.90; Rc = 0.85, LoA = 10.5 kg), for women (ICC = 0.67; R = 0.77; Rc = .62, LoA = 7.7 kg) and for men (ICC = 0.80; R = 0.85; Rc = 0.78, LoA = 13.1 kg), respectively.

Conclusion: One-repetition maximum testing using elastic resistance bands provides valid measurements of maximal knee extension strength in older women and men but with wide variations on an individual level.

Keywords
Elastic bands, Knee extension, Maximal strength, Older adults, One-repetition maximum, Validity
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119955 (URN)
Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lindström, B., Rickenlund, A. & Wadell, K. (2015). Low-load/high-repetition elastic band resistance training in patients with COPD: a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial. Clinical Respiratory Journal, 9(3), 278-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-load/high-repetition elastic band resistance training in patients with COPD: a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial
2015 (English)In: Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1752-6981, E-ISSN 1752-699X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 278-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High-repetitive resistance training is recommended to increase peripheral muscular endurance in healthy adults, however the effects of resistance training with this design on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unknown.

Objective: Investigate if low load / high repetition elastic band resistance training (RT) could improve functional capacity, muscular function, endurance cycle capacity or HRQOL in patients with COPD.

Methods: A prospective, randomized controlled multicentre trial was constructed with concealed allocation, blinded outcome assessment, and intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 44 patients with moderate to very severe COPD (FEV1 44.6% predicted) were included. Patients were randomized to either the experimental group receiving eight weeks of RT (3 sessions/week) in combination with patient education (four occasions) or the control group receiving the patient education alone.

Results: At post-tests, the between-group differences were in favor of the experimental group on the 6 minute walk test (mean difference (95% confidence interval)): 34 meters (14 to 54) and the 6 minute pegboard and ring test (20 rings (3 to 37). No difference between groups was found on the chronic respiratory disease questionnaire (0.1 (-0.2 to 0.4). On secondary outcomes, results were in favor of the experimental group regarding upper extremity endurance capacity, muscular function and depression but no difference was seen between groups on endurance cycle capacity and HRQOL.

Conclusion: RT can increase functional capacity and muscular function but not cycle endurance capacity and HRQOL in patients with moderate to severe COPD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
Keywords
exercise, lower extremity, pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive, quality of life, resistance training, upper extremity, single limb
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87856 (URN)10.1111/crj.12141 (DOI)000357899200003 ()24725729 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-13 Created: 2014-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lindström, B. & Wadell, K. (2014). A Cohort Study to Evaluate the Feasibility of Low Load/High Repetition Elastic Band Resistance Training for People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Journal of Novel Physiotherapies, 4, Article ID 190.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Cohort Study to Evaluate the Feasibility of Low Load/High Repetition Elastic Band Resistance Training for People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
2014 (English)In: Journal of Novel Physiotherapies, ISSN 2165-7025, Vol. 4, article id 190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Resistance training is an important component of pulmonary rehabilitation in people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). A vast majority or resistance training studies in COPD have focused on increasing muscular strength with use of weight machines and has been found to be a feasible approach in COPD. However, regarding feasibility of resistance training equipment other than weight machines, such as elastic resistance equipment, information is scarce. In addition, little is known regarding other trainable muscle characteristics, such as peripheral muscular endurance in COPD. We therefore aim to evaluate the feasibility of a low load/high repetition elastic band Resistance Training (RT) regimen in people with moderate to severe COPD. We also aim to evaluate if the RT regimen is feasible for the physiotherapists, conducting the intervention.

Methods: Twenty-two participants with moderate to severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1 58.7% predicted) and five physiotherapists participated in the study. Measurements of attendance, assessment and progression of exercise intensity, adverse events, participant and compliance (participant and physiotherapist) were collected for assessment of feasibility.

Results: The mean (95% confidence interval) attendance rate was 94% (91-97) and mean exercise intensity was 79% (74-83) of the predicted maximum intensity. Furthermore, the median (interquartile range) compliance was 96% (94-96) and 100% (94-100) for the people with COPD and the physiotherapists respectively. Exercise intensity increased on all exercises and any recorded adverse events were considered minor and temporary.

Conclusions: Low load/high repetition elastic band resistance training appears to be feasible for both people with COPD and the physiotherapists performing the intervention. These results indicate that elastic bands could be a feasible alternative to weight machines in resistance training for people with COPD.

National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87859 (URN)10.4172/2165-7025.1000190 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-13 Created: 2014-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Hedlund, M., Kolberg, A., Alm, L., Lindström, B. & Wadell, K. (2014). The accuracy of using elastic resistance bands to evaluate muscular strength. Advances in Physiotherapy, 16(2), 104-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The accuracy of using elastic resistance bands to evaluate muscular strength
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2014 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, European Journal of Physiotherapy, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Elastic resistance as a tool for evaluation of muscular strength has rarely been addressed even though it is commonly used in exercise and rehabilitation regimens involving the shoulder muscles. The aim was therefore to investigate the relationship and potential difference between development of force during maximal isokinetic (maximum peak force, maximum mean force and peak mean force) and elastic (one-repetition maximum (1 RM)) concentric shoulder fl exion in healthy older adults. A total of 30 voluntary adults over the age of 50 (15 women, 15 men) were included. Intraclass correlation coefficient absolute agreement was 0.85, 0.43 and 0.48 for the isokinetic values respectively, when all subjects were analysed together. No difference was found between the isokinetic maximum peak force value and the elastic 1 RM for all participants (0.15 kg, p 0.791), for men (0.80 kg, p 0.121) or women ( 0.49 kg, p 0.135). Variations at an individual level, i.e. 95% limits of agreement, were 3.3 kg for all participants, 2.8 kg for women and 3.2 kg for men. These results imply that elastic resistance could be used to evaluate shoulder fl exion strength in both older men and women. However, thevariation on an individual level and the lower agreement among women is important to consider.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87826 (URN)10.3109/21679169.2014.889746 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-13 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lindström, B. & Wadell, K. (2013). Evidence for single-limb exercises on exercise capacity, quality of life, and dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic heart failure. Physical Therapy Reviews, 18(3), 157-172
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence for single-limb exercises on exercise capacity, quality of life, and dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic heart failure
2013 (English)In: Physical Therapy Reviews, ISSN 1083-3196, E-ISSN 1743-288X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 157-172Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although single-limb exercise (SLE) has been used for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and for patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), the evidence for SLE has not been evaluated systematically and remains unclear.

Objectives: Determine the evidence for the effect of SLE compared to any comparator on outcome measurements for exercise capacity, quality of life (QoL) or dyspnea in patients with COPD or CHF.

Methods: PubMed, PEDro, and CENTRAL databases were searched from inception until 31 May 2011. Searches started 1 April 2011. English language randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Extraction of data was performed by two review authors. Data and evidence for SLE were summarized in accordance with grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Authors of included studies were contacted for missing data.

Results: Six RCTs (two COPD and four CHF) were included. Low to very low-quality evidence indicates that SLE significantly improved exercise capacity, but not dyspnea, in patients with COPD, and significantly improved exercise capacity outcomes compared to a control in patients with CHF. However, when SLE was compared to non-SLE regimes in patients with CHF, positive effects were found irrespective of training regime regarding exercise capacity and QoL.

Conclusions: SLE appears to be effective in both conditions especially regarding exercise capacity, and might be included in exercise programs in patients with COPD or CHF. However, the evidence is low to very low according to GRADE and more clinical studies of high quality are required.

Keywords
Chronic heart failure; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Evidence; GRADE; Single limb exercises
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80246 (URN)10.1179/1743288X13Y.0000000072 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-12 Created: 2013-09-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Larsson, G., Julu, P. O. .., Witt Engerström, I., Sandlund, M. & Lindström, B. (2013). Normal reactions to orthostatic stress in Rett syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34(6), 1897-1905
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Normal reactions to orthostatic stress in Rett syndrome
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2013 (English)In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1897-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate orthostatic reactions in females with Rett syndrome (RTT), and also whether the severity of the syndrome had an impact on autonomic reactions. Based on signs of impaired function of the central autonomic system found in RTT, it could be suspected that orthostatic reactions were affected. The orthostatic reactions in 21 females with RTT and 14 normally developed femalesmatched by age were investigated when they rose from a sitting position, and during standing for 3 min. Reactions of the heart, the blood pressure and the time for recovery of systolic blood pressure, were studied in real time, heartbeat by heartbeat, simultaneously. There was no difference between participants with RTT and the normally developed controls regarding general orthostatic reactions (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure) when getting up from a sitting position, and when standing erect for 3min. In the specific immediate response by the heart to standing up, the 30:15 ratio, significantly lower values were found for females with RTT. In the RTT group, the maximum fall of systolic blood pressure showed a tendency to a larger decrease, and the initial decrease in systolic blood pressure was significantly faster. The time for recovery of systolic blood pressure from standing erect did not differ between groups. At baseline the females with RTT had significantly lower systolic blood pressure and a tendency to a higher heart rate. The results do not indicate any autonomic limitations for people with RTT in getting up from a sitting position and standing. The participants with RTT had normal orthostatic reactions indicated by the heart and blood pressure responses when standing erect for 3 min. A faster initial drop in systolic blood pressure in people with RTT was notable.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Pergamon Press, 2013
Keywords
Rett syndrome, Autonomic function, Healthy controls, Orthostatic reaction, Orthostatic hypotension
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-68402 (URN)10.1016/j.ridd.2013.02.027 (DOI)000318663300006 ()
Available from: 2013-04-18 Created: 2013-04-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A., Lindström, B. & Wadell, K. (2012). Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial. TRIALS, 13, 114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial
2012 (English)In: TRIALS, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, p. 114-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients. Methods/design: Trial design: a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial. Participants: stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40 years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden. Interventions: 1) high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE) training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8 weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2) the same patient education alone. Outcomes: Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test) and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire). Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1: 1 allocation to the intervention or control using random block sizes. Blinding: all outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment. Discussion: The results of this project will contribute to increase the body of knowledge regarding COPD and HRSLE.

Keywords
COPD; dyspnea; elastic resistance; exercise capacity; multicenter; quality of life; randomized controlled trial; single limb training
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-60658 (URN)10.1186/1745-6215-13-114 (DOI)000308893200001 ()
Available from: 2012-10-26 Created: 2012-10-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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