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Söderholm, Anders
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Hällgren, M. & Söderholm, A. (2009). Moral?: I don't care, I just run a project!. In: Feelings and business: Essays in honor of Claes Gustafsson (pp. 129-149). Stockholm: Santerus
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moral?: I don't care, I just run a project!
2009 (English)In: Feelings and business: Essays in honor of Claes Gustafsson, Stockholm: Santerus , 2009, p. 129-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Santerus, 2009
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-25618 (URN)978-91-7335-014-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-08-25 Created: 2009-08-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Söderholm, A. & Engwall, M. (2008). Funktionschefer i projektorganiserade företag. In: Projektliv: Villkor för uthållig projektverksamhet (pp. 217-230). : Författarna och Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Funktionschefer i projektorganiserade företag
2008 (Swedish)In: Projektliv: Villkor för uthållig projektverksamhet, Författarna och Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 217-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Författarna och Studentlitteratur, 2008
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-10612 (URN)978-91-44-05224-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Biedenbach, T. & Söderholm, A. (2008). The challenge of organizing change in hypercompetitive industries: a literature review. Journal of Change Management, 8(2), 123-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenge of organizing change in hypercompetitive industries: a literature review
2008 (English)In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 123-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hypercompetitive, that is, dynamic and unpredictable environments require flexible, innovative and creative organizations, which can easily adapt quickly to the changing rules of the competitive arena. Organizations, therefore, continuously need to change. The management of organizational change in such a merciless environment is together key and restraint. This paper reviews literature covering organizational change in hypercompetitive environments with a focus on projects as the vehicle to create the necessary flexibility. The challenge is thus to combine the need for long-term sustainability with continuous flexibility in terms of how organizational and technological change efforts are designed and carried out. Organizations are well advised to develop a high degree of dynamic capabilities, which are the core of meeting the tensions of the capability and structural challenge. The authors suggest that organizational aspects and capabilities have to go hand in hand as enabler and at the same time facilitator for a successful emergent change process in hypercompetitive industries.

Keywords
Hypercompetition, organizational change, organizational design, organizational structure, change capabilities
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-9950 (URN)10.1080/14697010801953967 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-29 Created: 2008-05-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Müllern, T., Söderholm, A. & Wåhlin, N. (2007). A Grammar of Organizing. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Grammar of Organizing
2007 (English)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2007. p. 189
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-18798 (URN)978-1-84844-457-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Blomquist, T., Gällstedt, M., Hällgren, M., Nilsson, A. & Söderholm, A. (2006). Project as practice: making project research matter. In: Proceedings of IRNOP VII Project Research Conference: . Paper presented at 7th IRNOP Research Conference, Northwestern Polytech Univ, Xian, PEOPLES R CHINA, OCT 11-13, 2006 (pp. 540-549). Beijing: Publishing house electronics industry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Project as practice: making project research matter
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2006 (English)In: Proceedings of IRNOP VII Project Research Conference, Beijing: Publishing house electronics industry , 2006, p. 540-549Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Project theory is not only an immature field of research, it is insubstantial when it comes to understanding what is really going on in projects. This paper contributes to making project research matter to the academic as well as the practitioner through the theoretical development of a project-as-practice approach, aligned with an ongoing debate in social science research. We outline the framework of project-as-practice and argue that there are two major challenges to the researcher: the relevance challenge and the pattern challenge. We suggest how these challenges can be met and give some examples of earlier studies that have done so. The practice approach is not a substitute to present theorizing but rather a complement that brings substance. Finally, underlying notions of the practice approach are outlined in order to have a fruitful future development of a project-as-practice approach that makes project theory matter!

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Beijing: Publishing house electronics industry, 2006
Keywords
strategy, management, perspective
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119422 (URN)000242042400046 ()7-121-03252-X (ISBN)
Conference
7th IRNOP Research Conference, Northwestern Polytech Univ, Xian, PEOPLES R CHINA, OCT 11-13, 2006
Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M. & Söderholm, A. (2002). Bridging Distances: Organizing Boundry-spanning Technology Development Projects. Regional Studies, 36(3), 263-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bridging Distances: Organizing Boundry-spanning Technology Development Projects
2002 (English)In: Regional Studies, ISSN 0034-3404, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Technology development is often a boundary-spanning activity where insights and discoveries from different organizations or organizational units are merged into new products or new technical solutions. In some cases, projects of this kind are organized within large multinational firms. In other cases, technology development projects are organized within networks through co-operation between independent companies possessing unique resources that can be utilized as parts of the project. In this paper, we discuss and analyse how distances are bridged in technology development projects. We focus on: (1) the relationship between implicit and explicit knowledge; and (2) different distances inherent in the development effort. Two different bridging processes are proposed as means to overcome distances: a separating-integrating process; and a linking-formalizing process. It is argued that a development project typically runs through either one of these two processes.

Keywords
organizing distances, innovation processes, boundary-spanning projects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-16492 (URN)doi:10.1080/0034340022061 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-01-23 Created: 2007-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Henfridsson, O. & Söderholm, A. (2000). Barriers to learning: on organizational defenses and vicious circles in technological adaptation. Accounting, Management and Information Technologies, 10(1), 33-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barriers to learning: on organizational defenses and vicious circles in technological adaptation
2000 (English)In: Accounting, Management and Information Technologies, ISSN 0959-8022, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

On the basis of an interpretive case study, the authors explore the learning implications of introducing First Class in a social services department. The investigated case illustrates how learning efforts easily result in ''vicious circles''; the more learning is sought after, the more solid are the barriers to learning. In this case, the existence of certain organizational virtues - the learning organization and the notion of the professional social worker - were observed to have negative learning implications. Paradoxically, at the espoused level, these two virtues can be understood as healthy signs, although their existence as only virtues makes them basically opposed to learning. The results of this study contribute to existing theory about discontinuity in technological adaptation.

Keywords
Technological adaptation, Learning, Social services, Communication technology, Organizational defensive routines
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5795 (URN)doi:10.1016/S0959-8022(99)00012-0 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-02-06 Created: 2007-02-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Henfridsson, O., Holmström, J. & Söderholm, A. (1997). Beyond the common sense of practice: A case for organizational informatics. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, 9(1), 47-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond the common sense of practice: A case for organizational informatics
1997 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 47-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33221 (URN)
Available from: 2010-04-19 Created: 2010-04-19 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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