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Rocher-Ros, G., Sponseller, R. A., Lidberg, W., Mörth, C.-M. & Giesler, R. (2019). Landscape process domains drive patterns of CO2 evasion from river networks [Letter to the editor]. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 4(4), 87-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Landscape process domains drive patterns of CO2 evasion from river networks
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2019 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 87-95Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streams are important emitters of CO2 but extreme spatial variability in their physical properties can make upscaling very uncertain. Here, we determined critical drivers of stream CO2 evasion at scales from 30 to 400 m across a 52.5 km2 catchment in northern Sweden. We found that turbulent reaches never have elevated CO2 concentrations, while less turbulent locations can potentially support a broad range of CO2 concentrations, consistent with global observations. The predictability of stream pCO2 is greatly improved when we include a proxy for soil‐stream connectivity. Catchment topography shapes network patterns of evasion by creating hydrologically linked “domains” characterized by high water‐atmosphere exchange and/or strong soil‐stream connection. This template generates spatial variability in the drivers of CO2 evasion that can strongly bias regional and global estimates. To overcome this complexity, we provide the foundations of a mechanistic framework of CO2 evasion by considering how landscape process domains regulate transfer and supply.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158874 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10108 (DOI)000474692600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013‐5001
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Ask, J., Andersson, A., Karlsson, J. & Giesler, R. (2018). Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 21(7), 1459-1470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1459-1470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rivers transport large amounts of allochthonous organic matter (OM) to the ocean every year, but there are still fundamental gaps in how allochthonous OM is processed in the marine environment. Here, we estimated the relative contribution of allochthonous OM (allochthony) to the biomass of benthic and pelagic consumers in a shallow coastal ecosystem in the northern Baltic Sea. We used deuterium as a tracer of allochthony and assessed both temporal variation (monthly from May to August) and spatial variation (within and outside river plume). We found variability in allochthony in space and time and across species, with overall higher values for zoobenthos (26.2 +/- 20.9%) than for zooplankton (0.8 +/- 0.3%). Zooplankton allochthony was highest in May and very low during the other months, likely as a result of high inputs of allochthonous OM during the spring flood that fueled the pelagic food chain for a short period. In contrast, zoobenthos allochthony was only lower in June and remained high during the other months. Allochthony of zoobenthos was generally higher close to the river mouth than outside of the river plume, whereas it did not vary spatially for zooplankton. Last, zoobenthos allochthony was higher in deeper than in shallower areas, indicating that allochthonous OM might be more important when autochthonous resources are limited. Our results suggest that climate change predictions of increasing inputs of allochthonous OM to coastal ecosystems may affect basal energy sources supporting coastal food webs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
climate change, terrestrial organic carbon, stable isotope analysis, autochthonous production, benthic-pelagic coupling, food webs, Bothnian Sea
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153548 (URN)10.1007/s10021-018-0233-5 (DOI)000448816300015 ()
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2018-12-03Bibliographically approved
Kuhn, M., Lundin, E. J., Giesler, R., Johansson, M. & Karlsson, J. (2018). Emissions from thaw ponds largely offset the carbon sink of northern permafrost wetlands. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 9535.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emissions from thaw ponds largely offset the carbon sink of northern permafrost wetlands
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 9535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern regions have received considerable attention not only because the effects of climate change are amplified at high latitudes but also because this region holds vast amounts of carbon (C) stored in permafrost. These carbon stocks are vulnerable to warming temperatures and increased permafrost thaw and the breakdown and release of soil C in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The majority of research has focused on quantifying and upscaling the effects of thaw on CO2 and CH4 emissions from terrestrial systems. However, small ponds formed in permafrost wetlands following thawing have been recognized as hotspots for C emissions. Here, we examined the importance of small ponds for C fluxes in two permafrost wetland ecosystems in northern Sweden. Detailed flux estimates of thaw ponds during the growing season show that ponds emit, on average (±SD), 279 ± 415 and 7 ± 11 mmol C m−2 d−1 of CO2 and CH4, respectively. Importantly, addition of pond emissions to the total C budget of the wetland decreases the C sink by ~39%. Our results emphasize the need for integrated research linking C cycling on land and in water in order to make correct assessments of contemporary C balances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150775 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-27770-x (DOI)000436046500049 ()29934641 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Pokrovsky, O. S., Karlsson, J. & Giesler, R. (2018). Freeze-thaw cycles of Arctic thaw ponds remove colloidal metals and generate low-molecular-weight organic matter. Biogeochemistry, 137(3), 321-336
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Freeze-thaw cycles of Arctic thaw ponds remove colloidal metals and generate low-molecular-weight organic matter
2018 (English)In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 321-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-latitude boreal and arctic surface/inland waters contain sizeable reservoirs of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and trace elements (TE), which are subject to seasonal freezing. Specifically, shallow ponds and lakes in the permafrost zone often freeze solid, which can lead to transformations in the colloidal and dissolved fractions of DOM and TE. Here, we present results from experimental freeze-thaw cycles using iron (Fe)- and DOM-rich water from thaw ponds situated in Stordalen and Storflaket palsa mires in northern Sweden. After ten cycles of freezing, 85% of Fe and 25% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were removed from solution in circumneutral fen water (pH 6.9) but a much smaller removal of Fe and DOC (< 7%) was found in acidic bog water (pH 3.6). This removal pattern was consistent with initial supersaturation of fen water with respect to Fe hydroxide and a lack of supersaturation with any secondary mineral phase in the bog water. There was a nearly two- to threefold increase in the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fraction of organic carbon (OC) and several TEs caused by the repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Future increases in the freeze-thaw frequency of surface waters with climate warming may remove up to 25% of DOC in circumneutral organic-rich waters. Furthermore, an increase of LMW OC may result in enhanced carbon dioxide losses from aquatic ecosystems since this fraction is potentially more susceptible to biodegradation.

Keywords
Peat, Fen, Bog, Ultrafiltration, Metal, Carbon
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145600 (URN)10.1007/s10533-018-0421-6 (DOI)000425543200004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5001
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Creed, I. F., Bergström, A.-K., Trick, C. G., Grimm, N. B., Hessen, D. O., Karlsson, J., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes. Global Change Biology, 24(8), 3692-3714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3692-3714Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern ecosystems are experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts of global change on Earth. Rising temperatures, hydrological intensification, changes in atmospheric acid deposition and associated acidification recovery, and changes in vegetative cover are resulting in fundamental changes in terrestrial-aquatic biogeochemical linkages. The effects of global change are readily observed in alterations in the supply of dissolved organic matter (DOM)-the messenger between terrestrial and lake ecosystems-with potentially profound effects on the structure and function of lakes. Northern terrestrial ecosystems contain substantial stores of organic matter and filter or funnel DOM, affecting the timing and magnitude of DOM delivery to surface waters. This terrestrial DOM is processed in streams, rivers, and lakes, ultimately shifting its composition, stoichiometry, and bioavailability. Here, we explore the potential consequences of these global change-driven effects for lake food webs at northern latitudes. Notably, we provide evidence that increased allochthonous DOM supply to lakes is overwhelming increased autochthonous DOM supply that potentially results from earlier ice-out and a longer growing season. Furthermore, we assess the potential implications of this shift for the nutritional quality of autotrophs in terms of their stoichiometry, fatty acid composition, toxin production, and methylmercury concentration, and therefore, contaminant transfer through the food web. We conclude that global change in northern regions leads not only to reduced primary productivity but also to nutritionally poorer lake food webs, with discernible consequences for the trophic web to fish and humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
atmospheric change, cyanobacteria, dissolved organic matter, food webs, lake, mercury, northern
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150465 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14129 (DOI)000437284700035 ()29543363 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, AKB 2010-4675Swedish Research Council, RG 2013-5001
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Kupryianchyk, D., Giesler, R., Bidleman, T. F., Liljelind, P., Lau, D. C., Sponseller, R. A. & Andersson, P. L. (2018). Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 37(12), 3011-3017
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Industrial and natural compounds in filter-feeding black fly larvae and water in 3 tundra streams
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 3011-3017Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, novel flame retardants, and naturally occurring bromoanisoles in water and filter-feeding black fly (Simuliidae) larvae in 3 tundra streams in northern Sweden. The results demonstrate that black fly larvae accumulate a wide range of organic contaminants and can be used as bioindicators of water pollution in Arctic streams.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Emerging pollutants, Fate and transport, Bioaccumulation, Long-range transport, Arctic streams, Legacy contaminants
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153986 (URN)10.1002/etc.4267 (DOI)000451335300007 ()30183099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Lyon, S. W., Ploum, S. W., van der Velde, Y., Rocher-Ros, G., Mörth, C.-M. & Giesler, R. (2018). Lessons learned from monitoring the stable water isotopic variability in precipitation and streamflow across a snow-dominated subarctic catchment. Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, 50(1), Article ID e1454778.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons learned from monitoring the stable water isotopic variability in precipitation and streamflow across a snow-dominated subarctic catchment
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2018 (English)In: Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, ISSN 1523-0430, E-ISSN 1938-4246, Vol. 50, no 1, article id e1454778Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This empirical study explores shifts in stable water isotopic composition for a subarctic catchment located in northern Sweden as it transitions from spring freshet to summer low flows. Relative changes in the isotopic composition of streamflow across the main catchment and fifteen nested subcatchments are characterized in relation to the isotopic composition of precipitation. With our sampling campaign, we explore the variability in stream-water isotopic composition that originates from precipitation as the input shifts from snow to rain and as landscape flow pathways change across scales. The isotopic similarity of high-elevation snowpack water and early season rainfall water seen through our sampling scheme made it difficult to truly isolate the impact of seasonal precipitation phase change on stream-water isotopic response. This highlights the need to explicitly consider the complexity of arctic and alpine landscapes when designing sampling strategies to characterize hydrological variability via stable water isotopes. Results show a potential influence of evaporation and source water mixing both spatially (variations with elevation) and temporally (variations from post-freshet to summer flows) on the composition of stream water across Miellajokka. As such, the data collected in this empirical study allow for initial conceptualization of the relative importance of, for example, hydrological connectivity within this mountainous, subarctic landscape.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
catchment hydrology, stable water isotopes, tracers, spring flood, freshet
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150385 (URN)10.1080/15230430.2018.1454778 (DOI)000438738900001 ()
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2018-08-17Bibliographically approved
George, T. S., Giles, C. D., Menezes-Blackburn, D., Condron, L. M., Gama-Rodrigues, A. C., Jaisi, D., . . . Haygarth, P. M. (2018). Organic phosphorus in the terrestrial environment: a perspective on the state of the art and future priorities. Plant and Soil, 427(1-2), 191-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organic phosphorus in the terrestrial environment: a perspective on the state of the art and future priorities
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2018 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 427, no 1-2, p. 191-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The dynamics of phosphorus (P) in the environment is important for regulating nutrient cycles in natural and managed ecosystems and an integral part in assessing biological resilience against environmental change. Organic P (P-o) compounds play key roles in biological and ecosystems function in the terrestrial environment being critical to cell function, growth and reproduction.

Scope: We asked a group of experts to consider the global issues associated with P-o in the terrestrial environment, methodological strengths and weaknesses, benefits to be gained from understanding the P-o cycle, and to set priorities for P-o research.

Conclusions: We identified seven key opportunities for P-o research including: the need for integrated, quality controlled and functionally based methodologies; assessment of stoichiometry with other elements in organic matter; understanding the dynamics of P-o in natural and managed systems; the role of microorganisms in controlling P-o cycles; the implications of nanoparticles in the environment and the need for better modelling and communication of the research. Each priority is discussed and a statement of intent for the P-o research community is made that highlights there are key contributions to be made toward understanding biogeochemical cycles, dynamics and function of natural ecosystems and the management of agricultural systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2018
Keywords
Ecosystems services, Method development, Microbiome, Modelling, Organic phosphorus, oichiometry
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150186 (URN)10.1007/s11104-017-3391-x (DOI)000434056500014 ()
Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Myrstener, M., Rocher-Ros, G., Burrows, R. M., Bergström, A.-K., Giesler, R. & Sponseller, R. A. (2018). Persistent nitrogen limitation of stream biofilm communities along climate gradients in the Arctic. Global Change Biology, 24(8), 3680-3691
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persistent nitrogen limitation of stream biofilm communities along climate gradients in the Arctic
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3680-3691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is rapidly reshaping Arctic landscapes through shifts in vegetation cover and productivity, soil resource mobilization, and hydrological regimes. The implications of these changes for stream ecosystems and food webs is unclear and will depend largely on microbial biofilm responses to concurrent shifts in temperature, light, and resource supply from land. To study those responses, we used nutrient diffusing substrates to manipulate resource supply to biofilm communities along regional gradients in stream temperature, riparian shading, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loading in Arctic Sweden. We found strong nitrogen (N) limitation across this gradient for gross primary production, community respiration and chlorophyll-a accumulation. For unamended biofilms, activity and biomass accrual were not closely related to any single physical or chemical driver across this region. However, the magnitude of biofilm response to N addition was: in tundra streams, biofilm response was constrained by thermal regimes, whereas variation in light availability regulated this response in birch and coniferous forest streams. Furthermore, heterotrophic responses to experimental N addition increased across the region with greater stream water concentrations of DOC relative to inorganic N. Thus, future shifts in resource supply to these ecosystems are likely to interact with other concurrent environmental changes to regulate stream productivity. Indeed, our results suggest that in the absence of increased nutrient inputs, Arctic streams will be less sensitive to future changes in other habitat variables such as temperature and DOC loading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Arctic, bioassay, biofilm, climate change, colimitation, nitrogen limitation, nutrient addition, stream productivity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150651 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14117 (DOI)000437284700034 ()29516598 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045398289 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5001Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-5001; 217-2012-1418
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Giesler, R., Karina, E. C., Wardle, D. A., Klaminder, J. & Bindler, R. (2017). Boreal Forests Sequester Large Amounts of Mercury over Millennial Time Scales in the Absence of Wildfire. Environmental Science and Technology, 51(5), 2621-2627
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boreal Forests Sequester Large Amounts of Mercury over Millennial Time Scales in the Absence of Wildfire
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 2621-2627Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alterations in fire activity due to climate change and fire suppression may have profound effects on the balance between storage and release of carbon (C) and associated volatile elements. Stored soil mercury (Hg) is known to volatilize due to wildfires and this could substantially affect the land air exchange of Hg; conversely the absence of fires and human disturbance may increase the time period over which Hg is sequestered. Here we show for a wildfire chronosequence spanning over more than 5000 years in boreal forest in northern Sweden that belowground inventories of total Hg are strongly related to soil humus C accumulation (R-2 = 0.94, p < 0.001). Our data clearly show that northern boreal forest soils have a strong sink capacity for Hg, and indicate that the sequestered Hg is bound in soil organic matter pools accumulating over millennia. Our results also suggest that more than half of the Hg stock in the sites with the longest time since fire originates from deposition predating the onset of large-scale anthropogenic emissions. This study emphasizes the importance of boreal forest humus soils for Hg storage and reveals that this pool is likely to persist over millennial time scales in the prolonged absence of fire.

National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133770 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.6b06369 (DOI)000395963800017 ()28157285 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6381-4509

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