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Lee, Natuschka
Alternative names
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Lee, N. M. (Ed.). (2019). Biotechnological Applications of Extremophilic Microorganisms. Walter de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biotechnological Applications of Extremophilic Microorganisms
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2019. p. 400
Series
Life in Extreme Environments ; 6
National Category
Agricultural Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126968 (URN)978-3-11-042433-1 (ISBN)978-3-11-042773-8 (ISBN)
Note

To be published January 2018

Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2019-06-04
Lehto, K., Kauko, A., Nurmi, P., Lee, N., Chatzitheodoridis, E. & Lehto, H. (2019). eTimeTrek: digital deep history of the Universe. In: Deustua, S Eastwood, K TenKate, IL (Ed.), EPJ Web of Conferences: The International Symposium on Education in Astronomy and Astrobiology (ISE2A 2017). Paper presented at 1st International Symposium on Education in Astronomy and Astrobiology (ISE2A), Utrecht, NETHERLANDS, JUL 03-08, 2017. EDP Sciences, 200, Article ID 01020.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>eTimeTrek: digital deep history of the Universe
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2019 (English)In: EPJ Web of Conferences: The International Symposium on Education in Astronomy and Astrobiology (ISE2A 2017) / [ed] Deustua, S Eastwood, K TenKate, IL, EDP Sciences, 2019, Vol. 200, article id 01020Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EDP Sciences, 2019
Series
EPJ Web of Conferences, ISSN 2100-014X ; 200
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161489 (URN)10.1051/epjconf/201920001020 (DOI)000470907800020 ()
Conference
1st International Symposium on Education in Astronomy and Astrobiology (ISE2A), Utrecht, NETHERLANDS, JUL 03-08, 2017
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
de Vera, J.-P., Alawi, M., Backhaus, T., Baque, M., Billi, D., Boettger, U., . . . Zucconi, L. (2019). Limits of Life and the Habitability of Mars: The ESA Space Experiment BIOMEX on the ISS. Astrobiology, 19(2), 145-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limits of Life and the Habitability of Mars: The ESA Space Experiment BIOMEX on the ISS
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2019 (English)In: Astrobiology, ISSN 1531-1074, E-ISSN 1557-8070, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 145-157Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) is an ESA/Roscosmos space exposure experiment housed within the exposure facility EXPOSE-R2 outside the Zvezda module on the International Space Station (ISS). The design of the multiuser facility supports-among others-the BIOMEX investigations into the stability and level of degradation of space-exposed biosignatures such as pigments, secondary metabolites, and cell surfaces in contact with a terrestrial and Mars analog mineral environment. In parallel, analysis on the viability of the investigated organisms has provided relevant data for evaluation of the habitability of Mars, for the limits of life, and for the likelihood of an interplanetary transfer of life (theory of lithopanspermia). In this project, lichens, archaea, bacteria, cyanobacteria, snow/permafrost algae, meristematic black fungi, and bryophytes from alpine and polar habitats were embedded, grown, and cultured on a mixture of martian and lunar regolith analogs or other terrestrial minerals. The organisms and regolith analogs and terrestrial mineral mixtures were then exposed to space and to simulated Mars-like conditions by way of the EXPOSE-R2 facility. In this special issue, we present the first set of data obtained in reference to our investigation into the habitability of Mars and limits of life. This project was initiated and implemented by the BIOMEX group, an international and interdisciplinary consortium of 30 institutes in 12 countries on 3 continents. Preflight tests for sample selection, results from ground-based simulation experiments, and the space experiments themselves are presented and include a complete overview of the scientific processes required for this space experiment and postflight analysis. The presented BIOMEX concept could be scaled up to future exposure experiments on the Moon and will serve as a pretest in low Earth orbit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2019
Keywords
EXPOSE-R2, BIOMEX, Habitability, Limits of life, Extremophiles, Mars
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158759 (URN)10.1089/ast.2018.1897 (DOI)000463364800001 ()30742496 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
Lee, N. M. (2019). Whole Cell Identification of Microorganisms in Their Natural Environment with Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH). In: Janice P. L. Kenney, Harish Veeramani, Daniel S. Alessi (Ed.), Analytical geomicrobiology: a handbook of instrumental techniques (pp. 187-212). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whole Cell Identification of Microorganisms in Their Natural Environment with Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)
2019 (English)In: Analytical geomicrobiology: a handbook of instrumental techniques / [ed] Janice P. L. Kenney, Harish Veeramani, Daniel S. Alessi, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 187-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the main goals in biogeochemistry is to explore the global relationships between organisms and chemical elements in different ecosystems. A diversity of analytical techniques based on chemical-physical or molecular biological procedures are available to explore different organisms and their abiotic and biotic interactions in a variety of ecosystems. Even though many of these modern analytical techniques are irreplaceable in today´s research, most of them can only provide indirect results because they are built on a “black-box” approach, where the biological species in an ecosystem or a geological environment are disrupted for extraction of nucleic acids, proteins, etc. Essential biological information, such as the morphology of specific species, their location, distribution, association with other organisms in their natural environment, and individual activities and functions, is therefore lost. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) helps retrieve this information without either cultivation or extraction of cell components, and can therefore provide a quick and useful complement to different “black-box”-based approaches. FISH is based on fluorescently labeled gene probes with a unique nucleotide composition designed to match specific genes in different cellular species. Thus, different biological species can be identified simultaneously with different gene probes labeled with different fluorochromes in their natural environment. The technique has undergone extensive development with around 30 variations for different applications. FISH is evaluated either by microscopy (e.g., fluorescence microscopy, Raman micro spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS), or by nonmicroscope-based methods, such as flow cytometry, microarray technology, or molecular biological methods such as proteomics. This chapter will serve as a guide for sample preparation, selection of appropriate FISH protocols, evaluation and design of gene probes, and evaluation of FISH experiments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166597 (URN)10.1017/9781107707399.008 (DOI)978-1-107-07033-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Haas, J. C., Street, N. R., Sjödin, A., Lee, N. M., Högberg, M. N., Näsholm, T. & Hurry, V. (2018). Microbial community response to growing season and plant nutrient optimisation in a boreal Norway spruce forest. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 125, 197-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial community response to growing season and plant nutrient optimisation in a boreal Norway spruce forest
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2018 (English)In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 125, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between Norway spruce trees and bacteria and fungi in nutrient limited boreal forests can be beneficial for tree growth and fitness. Tree-level effects of anthropogenic nutrient addition have been well studied, however understanding of the long-term effects on the associated microbiota is limited. Here, we report on the sensitivity of microbial community composition to the growing season and nutrient additions. Highthroughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal ITS1 region was used to characterise changes in the microbial community after application of a complete mineral nutrient mixture for five and 25 years. The experiment was conducted using the Flakaliden forest research site in northern boreal Sweden and included naturally low nutrient control plots. Needle and fine root samples of Norway spruce were sampled in addition to bulk soil during one growing season to provide comprehensive insight into phyllosphere and belowground microbiota community changes. The phyllosphere microbiota was compositionally distinct from the belowground communities and phyllosphere diversity increased significantly over the growing season but was not influenced by the improved nutrient status of the trees. In both root and soil samples, alpha diversity of fungal, in particular ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), and bacterial communities increased after long-term nutrient optimisation, and with increasing years of treatment the composition of the fungal and bacterial communities changed toward a community with a higher relative abundance of nitrophilic EMF and bacterial species but did not cause complete loss of nitrophobic species from the ecosystem. From this, we conclude that 25 years of continuous nutrient addition to a boreal spruce stand increased phylotype richness and diversity of the microbiota in the soil, and at the root-soil interface, suggesting that long-term anthropogenic nutrient inputs can have positive effects on belowground biodiversity that may enhance ecosystem robustness. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of these changes to the microbiota on ecosystem carbon storage and nitrogen cycling in boreal forests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Boreal forest, Ectomycorrhiza, Microbial community composition, Norway spruce, Balanced nutrient addition, Illumina MiSeq
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151103 (URN)10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.07.005 (DOI)000444660400020 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Lee, N. N., Fritz, J., Fries, M. D., Gil, J. F., Beck, A., Pellinen-Wannberg, A., . . . Hofmann, B. A. (2017). The extreme biology of meteorites: their role in understanding the origin and distribution of life on earth and in the Universe (2ed.). In: Helga Stan-Lotter, Sergiu Fendrihan (Ed.), Adaption of microbial life to environmental extremes: novel research results and application (pp. 283-325). Cham: Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The extreme biology of meteorites: their role in understanding the origin and distribution of life on earth and in the Universe
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2017 (English)In: Adaption of microbial life to environmental extremes: novel research results and application / [ed] Helga Stan-Lotter, Sergiu Fendrihan, Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2017, 2, p. 283-325Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Meteorites have captured our fascination since our early history – they have evoked awe, fear, an irresistible curiosity, and numerous lively debates. Former historians have indicated that many of the ancient cultures and civilizations in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Inuit, and the native Indians in America regarded both the meteorite and the location of their fall as sacred. Thus, they used the meteorites as religious objects or for craft design like jewelry, weapons, or even practical things like tools and horse shoes. Today, meteorites continue to capture our fascination through popular cultural formats such as science fiction and also as a scientific window that reveals the secrets of the Solar System formation. Within academia, meteorites have always fomented keen scientific debate. It was not until the early nineteenth century that the cosmic origin of meteorites, i.e., being truly not tellurian, was approved by the scientific community after the late eighteenth-century work of Ernst F. Chladni (1794). This implied for the first time that there are other smaller bodies in the sky besides the Moon. After this, several other lively debates followed on controversial findings and hypotheses around the role of meteorites in the universe and for the evolutionary course of life on Earth, often in connection with the profound difficulties to approach this subject in an adequate scientific way. Principally the different types of meteorites (asteroids, meteors, etc.) can be viewed as a most extreme or exotic substrate, habitat, and transport mode of chemicals and possibly even of cell-based life forms for several reasons:

  1. (i)

    They have experienced a remarkable history since their origin as condensates from the Solar Nebula, more or less metamorphosed or molten fragments of asteroids, or rocks from Mars or our Moon.

  2. (ii)

    The meteorites have been exposed to multiple extreme conditions ranging from milliseconds to billions of years duration when traveling through the interplanetary space, until they fell down on an astronomical body like Earth.

  3. (iii)

    Once on Earth, the meteorites get exposed to different weathering conditions, which often makes it a challenge to retrieve their former history in an unambiguous way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer Publishing Company, 2017 Edition: 2
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126970 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-48327-6_11 (DOI)978-3-319-48325-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-48327-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-10-24 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Horneck, G., Walter, N., Westall, F., Grenfell, J. L., Martin, W. F., Gomez, F., . . . Capria, M. T. (2016). AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap. Astrobiology, 16(3), 201-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap
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2016 (English)In: Astrobiology, ISSN 1531-1074, E-ISSN 1557-8070, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 201-243Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are

  1. • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems

  2. • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space

  3. • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life

  4. • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability

  5. • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection

It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2016
Keywords
Astrobiology roadmap, Europe, Origin and evolution of life, Habitability, Life detection, Life in extreme environments
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119662 (URN)10.1089/ast.2015.1441 (DOI)000372851100001 ()27003862 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Borekci, G. & Lee, N. M. (2016). Rapid Microscope Based Identification Method for Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) - Current State of The Art and Future Research Needs. In: Tuberculosis: . SM Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid Microscope Based Identification Method for Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria: Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) - Current State of The Art and Future Research Needs
2016 (English)In: Tuberculosis, SM Group , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major increasing causes of illness and death worldwide, especially in Asia and Africa. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of mycobacteria is important in the prevention and effective treatment of tuberculosis. Today, conventional culture methods are still accepted as the gold standard for the identification of mycobacteria in routine mycobacteriology laboratories. However, even if these methods are highly efficient and useful, these methods are time-consuming and labor-laborious. In recent years, several novel DNA-based and non-invasive techniques, such as RAMAN spectroscopy and microcalorimetry have been developed for a more rapid and reliable identification. Unfortunately, these methods are not capable of visualizing the cells in their natural environment such as in tissues. Visualization of cells may however provide fundamental, complementary information for the overall understanding of the molecular and microbial ecology of mycobacteria in disease processes. Here, we present a current state of the art review of the Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods which can be used to identify, visualize and quantify whole cells of different species of mycobacteria, especially the tuberculosis complex, and their associates in their natural environment without prior cultivation. Although this method also allows for an easy, rapid and cost-efficient identification (~1-3 hours) 2Tuberculosis | www.smgebooks.comCopyright  Borekci G.This book chapter is open access distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which allows users to download, copy and build upon published articles even for commercial purposes, as long as the author and publisher are properly credited. and simultaneous in situ visualization of different microbial species, it has so far only been used to a limited extent. Here, we will discuss both the potentials as well as limitations of FISH for the detection of mycobacteria and other relevant associates, and suggest some future research needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SM Group, 2016
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128714 (URN)978-1-944685-00-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
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