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Saati, Abrak
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Saati, A. (2019). Participatory constitution-making as a transnational legal norm: why does it "stick" in some contexts and not in others? (1ed.). In: Gregory Shaffer, Tom Ginsburg & Terrence C. Halliday (Ed.), Constitution making and transnational legal order: (pp. 283-311). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory constitution-making as a transnational legal norm: why does it "stick" in some contexts and not in others?
2019 (English)In: Constitution making and transnational legal order / [ed] Gregory Shaffer, Tom Ginsburg & Terrence C. Halliday, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019, 1, p. 283-311Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Comparative constitutional law and policy
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157431 (URN)10.1017/9781108561792.010 (DOI)9781108473101 (ISBN)9781108561792 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. & Eklund Wimelius, M. (2018). Building peace abroad and coming back home: experiences of Swedish police officers. Policing & society, 28(9), 1050-1064
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building peace abroad and coming back home: experiences of Swedish police officers
2018 (English)In: Policing & society, ISSN 1043-9463, E-ISSN 1477-2728, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 1050-1064Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ever since the Swedish Police Authority established a unit for Peace Support Operations in 2000, approximately 70–110 Swedish police officers have participated in peacebuilding missions around the globe on an annual basis. This signifies that a substantial number of Swedish police officers have gained practical experience of assisting post-conflict states to rebuild their societies, reform their security sectors and establish a police force that acts in accordance with the principles of democratic policing. However, to date, there is no research that has set out to investigate these police officers’ experiences; not only of building peace abroad within the framework of democratic policing, but also of coming back home to reengage in Swedish police work. In this paper we begin to address this research gap. We do so through a number of qualitative interviews with Swedish police officers who have recent experiences of participating in peacebuilding missions in Liberia, Kosovo and Haiti. The findings show that despite certain obstacles, the police officers find ways to conduct police work in a manner that they believe supports the advancement of a democratic police force, and that their overall sentiment of building peace abroad is positive. However, their experiences of returning home to reengage in Swedish police work are less satisfactory. Officers express frustration that new insights and new knowledge gained abroad do not seem to be valued by the Swedish Police Authority. This is a finding that aligns with results from previous studies on Canadian and Australian police officers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Democratic policing, Haiti, Kosovo, Liberia
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131847 (URN)10.1080/10439463.2016.1276181 (DOI)000449944000004 ()2-s2.0-85008184052 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2018). Negotiating the Post-Revolution Constitution for Tunisia – Members of the National Constituent Assembly Share Their Experiences. International Law Research, 7(1), 235-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating the Post-Revolution Constitution for Tunisia – Members of the National Constituent Assembly Share Their Experiences
2018 (English)In: International Law Research, ISSN 1927-5234, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Though the Tunisian transition to democracy faces challenges seven years following the 2011 revolution and four years following the enactment of the new constitution, the country still constitutes a ‘success story’, especially in comparison to neighbouring states that were also touched by the Arab Uprisings. This paper takes an interest in exploring the Tunisian constitution-making process, and especially the political elite negotiated compromises that took place in the National Constituent Assembly. How were Tunisian religious and secular political forces able to unite and compromise on a constitutional document; what motivated their actions during the constitutional talks? Ideologies, rational pragmatism, self-serving interests or something else? This is a pertinent question that has bearing for other states that are in transition from authoritarian rule, in which religious and secular political parties are struggling to draft the political rules of the game anew. This is a qualitative study, based on interviews with political representatives, from a broad range of Tunisian political parties, who were part of the constitutional negotiations. Their responses suggest that pragmatism and rationality took precedence over ideological positions during the negotiations, and that this was indispensable for a draft to be produced. Despite this, the study argues that ideologies were likely not irrelevant in the minds of the political elites who were negotiating the post-revolution constitution, and that previous agreements and discussions among these elites that were, in fact, based on ideological positions, facilitated the constitutional negotiations that took place in the aftermath of the ousting of Ben-Ali

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2018
Keywords
post-authoritarian constitution-making, Tunisia, political elites, pragmatism, ideologies
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150523 (URN)10.5539/ilr.v7n1p235 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-00378
Available from: 2018-08-10 Created: 2018-08-10 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2018). Participation: to unveil a myth. In: Tania Abbiate, Markus Böckenförde and Veronica Federico (Ed.), Public participation in African constitutionalism: (pp. 13-25). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation: to unveil a myth
2018 (English)In: Public participation in African constitutionalism / [ed] Tania Abbiate, Markus Böckenförde and Veronica Federico, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 13-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter aims to discuss what public participation in the context of constitution making entails and illustrates characteristic features of different types of participation in constitution making processes. The initiators of the constitution making process have the possibility to design the process such that public influence is reduced or increased. Their aspiration to involve the general public so that genuine participation becomes a viable option depends on how the initiators communicate and inform the people about the constitution-making process. Some constitution making processes employ a one-way model of communication, which only serves to keep the public informed about the process without allowing feedback. In order to be able to make an assessment of how participatory a constitution-making process is, the extent of inclusion is also a factor that must be considered. The question of final authority is an essential aspect to determine how participatory a constitution making process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge Global Cooperation Series
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142692 (URN)9781138745872 (ISBN)9781315180540 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-07 Created: 2017-12-07 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2017). Constitution-building  bodies and the sequencing of public participation: a comparison of seven empirical cases. Journal of Politics and Law, 10(3), 13-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constitution-building  bodies and the sequencing of public participation: a comparison of seven empirical cases
2017 (English)In: Journal of Politics and Law, ISSN 1913-9047, E-ISSN 1913-9055, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Constitution-building is one of the most salient aspects of transitional processes, from war to peace or from authoritarian rule, in terms of establishing and strengthening democracy. This paper is part of a research project that aims to identify the circumstances under which constitution-building can strengthen democracy after violent conflict and during transitions from authoritarian rule. Previous research has indicated that the actions and relations of political elites from opposing political parties when making the constitution has bearing on the state of democracy post promulgation, but that the careful sequencing of public participation in the process can be of relevance as well. This paper conducts a systematic analysis of seven empirical cases and focuses the investigation to the type of constitution-building body that has been employed and to during what stage of the process the general public have been invited to participate. It concludes that popularly elected constitution-building bodies tend to include a broad range of political parties and that they, additionally, tend to have rules of procedure that encourage compromise and negotiation, whereas appointed bodies are dominated by one single party or one single person and do not have rules of procedure that necessitate compromise. The paper also discusses the potential need for political elites to have negotiated a number of baseline constitutional principles prior to inviting the general public to get involved in the constitution-building process, and concludes that this is an area of research in need of further in-depth empirical case-studies.

Keywords
Constitution-building, politica elites, public participation, democratization, post-conflict states, transitional states
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133898 (URN)10.5539/jpl.v10n3p13 (DOI)000405144100002 ()
Projects
How can constitution-building processes in post-conflict states and in states transitioning from authoritarian rule contribute to enhancing democracy?
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-00378
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2017). Participatory constitution-building in Nepal: a comparison of the 2008-2012 and the 2013-2015 process. Journal of Politics and Law, 10(4), 29-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory constitution-building in Nepal: a comparison of the 2008-2012 and the 2013-2015 process
2017 (English)In: Journal of Politics and Law, ISSN 1913-9047, E-ISSN 1913-9055, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Participatory constitution-building is a trend that appears to be here to stay; particularly when new constitutions are drafted in the aftermath of war or during transitions from authoritarian to democratic rule. Anticipations as to what the involvement of the public will achieve are several, and scholars are only recently starting to systematically investigate whether or not these expectations find empirical support. Previous research has shown that public participation in the making of the constitution can have certain positive effects at an individual level of analysis, but that the actions of political elites during constitutional negotiations might affect outcomes at a macro level of analysis more than what has hitherto be acknowledged in this strand of research. Nepal is one of the most recent cases of participatory constitution-building, and the country carried out not only one, but two, such processes within a time period of only seven years. The first resulted in failure as a draft constitution was never finalized; the other in success with the adoption of a constitution in 2015. This article takes an interest in exploring and comparing these two separate processes as regards the extent of public participation vis-à-vis political elite negotiations and bargaining behind closed doors. The article finds that what primarily sets the two processes apart, is how broad based public participation and secluded elite negotiations were sequenced. In light of other empirical examples, the article also discusses if elite bargains ought to be struck before the general public are invited to participate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2017
Keywords
Nepal, constitution-building, public participation, political elite bargaining, sequencing
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138382 (URN)10.5539/jpl.v10n4p29 (DOI)000411519700004 ()
Projects
How can constitution-building processes in post-conflict states and in states transitioning from authoritarian rule contribute to enhancing democracy?
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-00378
Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2017). Participatory Constitution-Making as a Transnational Legal Norm: Why Does It “Stick” in Some Contexts and Not in Others?. UC Irvine Journal of International, Transnational and Comparative Law, 2, 113-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participatory Constitution-Making as a Transnational Legal Norm: Why Does It “Stick” in Some Contexts and Not in Others?
2017 (English)In: UC Irvine Journal of International, Transnational and Comparative Law, Vol. 2, p. 113-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It could be argued that since the dawn of the peace-building era in the early 1990s, public participation in constitution-making processes has developed into a transnational legal norm. International organizations, NGOs, CSOs, scholars and think tanks around the globe repeatedly stress the value of including ordinary citizens in the making of their founding laws. As a consequence, the practice of participatory constitution-making has also increased. Though this is a seemingly established transnational legal norm, it is still a norm that has been more or less successfully adopted in different contexts. This article takes an interest in exploring why this is so. How is it that this norm is institutionalized in some contexts, internalized in others, institutionalized and internalized in yet other contexts, and simply rejected in still other contexts?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Irvine: , 2017
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134189 (URN)
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2017-04-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Jarstad, A., Åkebo, M., Johansson, P., Barnes, P., Eklund, N., Eklund Wimelius, M., . . . Söderström, J. (2017). Varieties of peace: presentation of a research program. Umeå: Umeå Universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Varieties of peace: presentation of a research program
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Varieties of Peace research program aims to analyze long-term effects of peace processes in conflicts that ended in the 1990s. The central research questions are: What characterizes peace after the peace processes initiated in the 1990s and how does it vary? How can this variation be described and explained? Peace processes have been studied using short time perspectives, usually in ”lessons-learned” evaluations five years after conflict termination, and usually with theories of conflict as a starting point. The Varieties of Peace research program is an ambitious initiative, which starts from a theoretical understanding of peace, its quality and character, and views peace and peace processes as dynamic and transformative. It will investigate and evaluate different types of peace processes from a comparative perspective and 25–30 years after they started, with the ambition of producing generalizable knowledge about peace, what it is and how it can be achieved. As a starting point, the program studies explanatory factors in five areas: 1) the actions, capacity and resilience of civil society, 2) the interests and strategies of the elites, 3) the aims and character of the agreements, 4) the societies’ institutions and resilience, and 5) international involvement. These issues will be studies in at least ten projects, with the ambition to capture and explain variation, internal dynamics and ultimately the results and effects of peace processes, studied over a longer period of time. The Varieties of Peace program is funded by Riksbankens Jubileumsfond: the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences, 2017-2024. For more info, please visit our webpage at www.varietiesofpeace.net.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2017. p. 23
Series
Umeå Working Papers in Peace and Conflict Studies, ISSN 1654-2398 ; 9
Keywords
peace; peace processes; peace agreements; peacebuilding
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137164 (URN)978-91-7601-744-9 (ISBN)
Projects
Varieties of Peace
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, 2017-2024
Available from: 2017-06-27 Created: 2017-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Saati, A. (2016). Different Types of Participation in Constitution Making Processes: Towards a Conceptualization. Southern African Journal of Policy and Development, 2(2), 18-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Types of Participation in Constitution Making Processes: Towards a Conceptualization
2016 (English)In: Southern African Journal of Policy and Development, ISSN 2411-5479, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Though participatory constitution making processes in post-conflict states and in states transitioning from authoritarian rule have become a new trend, scholarly research has yet to approach the notion of participation in a sharp and distinct way. In this article, I develop a novel approach for differentiating participation in constitution making, depending on the extent of influence that participants are granted, illustrating this reasoning with eight empirical cases from the African continent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Zambia: , 2016
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119849 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Saati, A., Wimelius, M. E. & Naarttijärvi, M. (2016). Svensk polis i utlandstjänst: om erfarenheter av att arbeta i internationella missioner och att återvända hem. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Svensk polis i utlandstjänst: om erfarenheter av att arbeta i internationella missioner och att återvända hem
2016 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2016. p. 51
Series
Polisutbildningens skriftserie ; 6
Keywords
polis, utlandstjänst, fredsbyggande
National Category
Law Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research; Law; political science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128581 (URN)978-91-7601-635-0 (ISBN)
Projects
Mänskliga rättigheter borta och hemma – om svensk polis i utlandstjänst
Available from: 2016-12-07 Created: 2016-12-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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