umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Johansson, C., Lövenheim, B., Schantz, P., Wahlgren, L., Almström, P., Markstedt, A., . . . Nilsson Sommar, J. (2017). Impacts on air pollution and health by changing commuting from car to bicycle. Science of the Total Environment, 584-585, 55-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts on air pollution and health by changing commuting from car to bicycle
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 584-585, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our study is based on individual data on people's home and work addresses, as well as their age, sex and physical capacity, in order to establish realistic bicycle-travel distances. A transport model is used to single out data on commuting preferences in the County Stockholm. Our analysis shows there is a very large potential for reducing emissions and exposure if all car drivers living within a distance corresponding to a maximum of a 30 min bicycle ride to work would change to commuting by bicycle. It would result in > 111,000 new cyclists, corresponding to an increase of 209% compared to the current situation.

Mean population exposure would be reduced by about 7% for both NOx and black carbon (BC) in the most densely populated area of the inner city of Stockholm. Applying a relative risk for NOx of 8% decrease in all-cause mortality associated with a 10 μg m− 3decrease in NOx, this corresponds to > 449 (95% CI: 340–558) years of life saved annually for the Stockholm county area with 2.1 million inhabitants. This is more than double the effect of the reduced mortality estimated for the introduction of congestion charge in Stockholm in 2006. Using NO2 or BC as indicator of health impacts, we obtain 395 (95% CI: 172–617) and 185 (95% CI: 158–209) years of life saved for the population, respectively. The calculated exposure of BC and its corresponding impacts on mortality are likely underestimated. With this in mind the estimates using NOx, NO2 and BC show quite similar health impacts considering the 95% confidence intervals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Air pollution, Vehicle emissions, Road traffic, Human health, Population exposure, Mortality, Cycling
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130769 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.01.145 (DOI)000399358500007 ()28135613 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-01-31 Created: 2017-01-31 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Strömgren, M., Holm, E., Dahlström, Ö., Ekberg, J., Eriksson, H., Spreco, A. & Timpka, T. (2017). Place-based social contact and mixing: a typology of generic meeting places of relevance for infectious disease transmission. Epidemiology and Infection, 145(12), 2582-2593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Place-based social contact and mixing: a typology of generic meeting places of relevance for infectious disease transmission
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 145, no 12, p. 2582-2593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aims to develop a typology of generic meeting places based on social contact and mixing of relevance for infectious disease transmission. Data was collected by means of a contact diary survey conducted on a representative sample of the Swedish population. The typology is derived from a cluster analysis accounting for four dimensions associated with transmission risk: visit propensity and its characteristics in terms of duration, number of other persons present and likelihood of physical contact. In the analysis, we also study demographic, socioeconomic and geographical differences in the propensity of visiting meeting places. The typology identifies the family venue, the fixed activity site, the family vehicle, the trading plaza and the social network hub as generic meeting places. The meeting place typology represents a spatially explicit account of social contact and mixing relevant to infectious disease modelling where the social context of the outbreak can be highlighted in light of the actual infectious disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2017
Keywords
Infectious disease, epidemiology, modelling
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135448 (URN)10.1017/S0950268817001169 (DOI)000414606100018 ()28625193 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Tammaru, T., Strömgren, M., van Ham, M. & Danzer, A. (2016). Relations between residential and workplace segregation among newly arrived immigrant men and women. Cities, 59, 131-138
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relations between residential and workplace segregation among newly arrived immigrant men and women
2016 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 59, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contemporary cities are becoming more and more diverse in population as a result of immigration. Research shows that while residential neighborhoods are becoming ethnically more diverse within cities, residential segregation from natives has overall remained persistently high. High levels of segregation are often seen as negative, preventing the integration of immigrants into their host society and having a negative impact on people's lives. Where as most studies of segregation deal with residential neighborhoods, this paper investigates segregation at workplaces for newly arrived immigrant men and women from the Global South to Sweden. By using the domain approach, we focus on the relationship between workplace segregation, residential segregation, and the ethnic composition of households. Using longitudinal register data from Sweden, we find that residential segregation is much weaker related to workplace segregation than revealed by studies using cross-sectional data. Furthermore, the residential context is not an important factor in explaining workplace segregation for immigrant men. The most important factors shaping workplace segregation pertain to economic sector and city size.

Keywords
Workplace segregation, Residential segregation, Intermarriage, Longitudinal analysis, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118923 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2016.02.004 (DOI)000397823200014 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-04-26 Created: 2016-04-06 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Timpka, T., Eriksson, H., Holm, E., Strömgren, M., Ekberg, J., Spreco, A. & Dahlström, Ö. (2016). Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures. Epidemiology and Infection, 144(10), 2031-2042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 144, no 10, p. 2031-2042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10·6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
Epidemiology,  infectious disease control,  influenza,  medical informatics (veterinary and medical),  modelling
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116125 (URN)10.1017/S0950268816000169 (DOI)000379785600002 ()26847017 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Modig, L., Meister, K., Strömgren, M., Jonsson, L. & Forsberg, B. (2015). Betydelsen av förändring i befolkningens geografiska utbredning över tid för resultaten i en hälsokonsekvensbedömning för ett större vägprojekt: Slutrapport. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betydelsen av förändring i befolkningens geografiska utbredning över tid för resultaten i en hälsokonsekvensbedömning för ett större vägprojekt: Slutrapport
Show others...
2015 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2015. p. 15
Series
Yrkes- och miljömedicin i Umeå rapporterar, ISSN 1654-7314 ; 2015:1
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103593 (URN)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-05-22 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Marcinczak, S., Tammaru, T., Strömgren, M. & Lindgren, U. (2015). Changing patterns of residential and workplace segregation in the Stockholm metropolitan area. Urban geography, 36(7), 969-992
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing patterns of residential and workplace segregation in the Stockholm metropolitan area
2015 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 969-992Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immigrant–native segregation is present in the spaces in which individuals from different ethnic/racial groups practice their everyday lives; interact with others and develop their ethnic, social and spatial networks. The overwhelming majority of academic research on immigrant segregation has focused on the residential domain, thus largely overlooking other arenas of daily interaction. The present study contributes to the emerging literature on immigrant residential and workplace segregation by examining changes in patterns of residential and workplace segregation over time. We draw our data from the Stockholm metropolitan region, Sweden’s main port of entry for immigrants. The results suggest a close association between residential and workplace segregation. Immigrant groups that are more segregated at home are also more segregated in workplace neighborhoods. More importantly, we found that a changing segregation level in one domain tends to involve a similar trend in the other domain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
segregation, immigrants, home, work, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101956 (URN)10.1080/02723638.2015.1012364 (DOI)000363317100002 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E., Olsson, D., Hagenbjörk-Gustafsson, A., Forsberg, B., Mattisson, K., Stroh, E., . . . Modig, L. (2014). Assessing ozone exposure for epidemiological studies in Malmö and Umeå, Sweden. Atmospheric Environment, 94, 241-248
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing ozone exposure for epidemiological studies in Malmö and Umeå, Sweden
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, E-ISSN 1873-2844, Vol. 94, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ground level ozone [ozone] is considered a harmful air pollutant but there is a knowledge gap regarding its long term health effects. The main aim of this study is to develop local Land Use Regression [LUR] models that can be used to study long term health effects of ozone. The specific aim is to develop spatial LUR models for two Swedish cities, Umea and Malmo, as well as a temporal model for Malmo in order to assess ozone exposure for long term epidemiological studies. For the spatial model we measured ozone, using Ogawa passive samplers, as weekly averages at 40 sites in each study area, during three seasons. This data was then inserted in the LUR-model with data on traffic, land use, population density and altitude to develop explanatory models of ozone variation. To develop the temporal model for Malmo, hourly ozone data was aggregated into daily means for two measurement stations in Malmo and one in a rural area outside Malmo. Using regression analyses we inserted meteorological variables into different temporal models and the one that performed best for all three stations was chosen. For Malmo the LUR-model had an adjusted model R-2 of 0.40 and cross validation R-2 of 0.17. For Umea the model had an adjusted model R-2 of 0.67 and cross validation adjusted R-2 of 0.48. When restricting the model to only including measuring sites from urban areas, the Malmo model had adjusted model R-2 of 0.51 (cross validation adjusted R-2 0.33) and the Umea model had adjusted model R-2 of 0.81 (validation adjusted R-2 of 0.73). The temporal model had adjusted model R-2 0.54 and 0.61 for the two Malmo sites, the cross validation adjusted R-2 was 0.42. In conclusion, we can with moderate accuracy, at least for Umea, predict the spatial variability, and in Malmo the temporal variability in ozone variation. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Land use regression, Ozone, Air pollution modelling, Epidemiology, Risk assessment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92898 (URN)10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.05.038 (DOI)000340316300027 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-09-15 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Strömgren, M., Tammaru, T., Danzer, A. M., van Ham, M., Marcińczak, S., Stjernström, O. & Lindgren, U. (2014). Factors shaping workplace segregation between natives and immigrants. Demography, 51(2), 645-671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors shaping workplace segregation between natives and immigrants
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Demography, ISSN 0070-3370, E-ISSN 1533-7790, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 645-671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on segregation of immigrant groups is increasingly turning its attention from residential areas toward other important places, such as the workplace, where immigrants can meet and interact with members of the native population. This article examines workplace segregation of immigrants. We use longitudinal, georeferenced Swedish population register data, which enables us to observe all immigrants in Sweden for the period 1990–2005 on an annual basis. We compare estimates from ordinary least squares with fixed-effects regressions to quantify the extent of immigrants' self-selection into specific workplaces, neighborhoods, and partnerships, which may bias more naïve ordinary least squares results. In line with previous research, we find lower levels of workplace segregation than residential segregation. The main finding is that low levels of residential segregation reduce workplace segregation, even after we take into account intermarriage with natives as well as unobserved characteristics of immigrants such as willingness and ability to integrate into the host society. Being intermarried with a native reduces workplace segregation for immigrant men but not for immigrant women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
workplace segregation, residential segregation, intermarriage, longitudinal analysis, Sweden
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79125 (URN)10.1007/s13524-013-0271-8 (DOI)000334169400014 ()2-s2.0-84897487285 (Scopus ID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2013-08-08 Created: 2013-08-08 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Gursky, E. A., Eriksson, O., Dahlström, Ö., Strömgren, M., . . . Holm, E. (2014). Intentions to perform non-pharmaceutical protective behaviors during influenza outbreaks in Sweden: A cross-sectional study following a mass vaccination campaign. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e91060
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intentions to perform non-pharmaceutical protective behaviors during influenza outbreaks in Sweden: A cross-sectional study following a mass vaccination campaign
Show others...
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. e91060-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Failure to incorporate the beliefs and attitudes of the public into theoretical models of preparedness has been identified as a weakness in strategies to mitigate infectious disease outbreaks. We administered a cross-sectional telephone survey to a representative sample (n = 443) of the Swedish adult population to examine whether self-reported intentions to improve personal hygiene and increase social distancing during influenza outbreaks could be explained by trust in official information, self-reported health (SF-8), sociodemographic factors, and determinants postulated in protection motivation theory, namely threat appraisal and coping appraisal. The interviewees were asked to make their appraisals for two scenarios: a) an influenza with low case fatality and mild lifestyle impact; b) severe influenza with high case fatality and serious disturbances of societal functions. Every second respondent (50.0%) reported high trust in official information about influenza. The proportion that reported intentions to take deliberate actions to improve personal hygiene during outbreaks ranged between 45–85%, while less than 25% said that they intended to increase social distancing. Multiple logistic regression models with coping appraisal as the explanatory factor most frequently contributing to the explanation of the variance in intentions showed strong discriminatory performance for staying home while not ill (mild outbreaks: Area under the curve [AUC] 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.82;0.89), severe outbreaks AUC 0.82 (95% CI 0.77;0.85)) and acceptable performance with regard to avoiding public transportation (AUC 0.78 (0.74;0.82), AUC 0.77 (0.72;0.82)), using handwash products (AUC 0.70 (0.65;0.75), AUC 0.76 (0.71;0.80)), and frequently washing hands (AUC 0.71 (0.66;0.76), AUC 0.75 (0.71;0.80)). We conclude that coping appraisal was the explanatory factor most frequently included in statistical models explaining self-reported intentions to carry out non-pharmaceutical health actions in the Swedish outlined context, and that variations in threat appraisal played a smaller role in these models despite scientific uncertainties surrounding a recent mass vaccination campaign.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2014
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86041 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0091060 (DOI)000332485800091 ()24608557 (PubMedID)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-16 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F., Strömgren, M., Ivarsson, A., Lindgren, U., Olsson, C., Lindkvist, M. & Sandström, O. (2014). Neighborhood conditions and celiac disease risk among children in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 42(7), 572-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighborhood conditions and celiac disease risk among children in Sweden
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 572-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To investigate celiac disease (CD) clustering at different geographical levels and to examine the association between neighborhood demographic and socioeconomic conditions and the risk of neighborhood CD.

Methods: We included 2080 children diagnosed with CD between 1998 and 2003, identified from 43 of the 47 reporting hospitals in Sweden. A total of 8036 small area market statistics (SAMS) areas were included; these were nested in 253 municipalities that were further nested into eight ‘nomenclature of territorial units for statistics’ (NUTS) 2 regions. We performed multilevel logistic regression analyses.

Results: We found the highest geographical variation in CD incidence at the municipality level, compared to the region level. The probability of having CD increased in the statistical areas of (SAMS) areas with higher average annual work income, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.24 and 95% CI of 1.76–2.85. Reduced CD risk in neighborhoods was associated with higher average age (OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.95–0.97), higher proportion of residents with a university education (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97–0.99), and higher level of industrial and commercial activity (OR 0.59; 95% CI 0.44–0.82). We found no significant association between CD risk and population density, proportion of Nordic to non-Nordic inhabitants, nor share of the population with only a compulsory education.

Conclusions: Neighborhood composition influences CD risk. This is one of the first attempts to identify factors explaining geographical variation in CD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Celiac disease,  demographics,  education,  environmental risk factors,  geography,  income,  neighborhoods,  socioeconomic conditions, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95395 (URN)10.1177/1403494814550173 (DOI)000344066600004 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-10-28 Created: 2014-10-28 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8913-7262

Search in DiVA

Show all publications