umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Edin, Benoni B.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Kanitz, G., Cipriani, C. & Edin, B. B. (2018). Classification of Transient Myoelectric Signals for the Control of Multi-Grasp Hand Prostheses. IEEE transactions on neural systems and rehabilitation engineering, 26(9), 1756-1764
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification of Transient Myoelectric Signals for the Control of Multi-Grasp Hand Prostheses
2018 (English)In: IEEE transactions on neural systems and rehabilitation engineering, ISSN 1534-4320, E-ISSN 1558-0210, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1756-1764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the neurophysiological signals underlying voluntary motor control and decoding them for controlling limb prostheses is one of the major challenges in applied neuroscience and rehabilitation engineering. While pattern recognition of continuous myoelectric (EMG) signals is arguably the most investigated approach for hand prosthesis control, its underlying assumption is poorly supported, i.e., that repeated muscular contractions produce consistent patterns of steady-state EMGs. In fact, it still remains to be shown that pattern recognition-based controllers allow natural control over multiple grasps in hand prosthesis outside well-controlled laboratory settings. Here, we propose an approach that relies on decoding the intended grasp from forearm EMG recordings associated with the onset of muscle contraction as opposed to the steady-state signals. Eight unimpaired individuals and two hand amputees performed four grasping movements with a variety of arm postures while EMG recordings subsequently processed to mimic signals picked up by conventional myoelectric sensors were obtained from their forearms and residual limbs, respectively. Off-line data analyses demonstrated the feasibility of the approach also with respect to the limb position effect. The sampling frequency and length of the classified EMG window that off-line resulted in optimal performance were applied to a controller of a research prosthesis worn by one hand amputee and proved functional in real-time when operated under realistic working conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2018
Keywords
Myoelectric control, pattern recognition, onset of muscle contraction, prosthetic hand, transient control
National Category
Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152263 (URN)10.1109/TNSRE.2018.2861465 (DOI)000444618100012 ()30072331 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2016-01635EU, European Research Council, 679820
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Själander, A., Edin, B., Warglo, Z. & Wennberg, Å. (2018). Sänkta krav på utländska läkare vore förödande. Dagens Samhälle (4 dec)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sänkta krav på utländska läkare vore förödande
Show others...
2018 (Swedish)In: Dagens Samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511, no 4 decArticle in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Det är avgörande att det ställs samma höga krav på läkare från länder utanför EU som på svenskutbildade. Bilden av att det ställs olika krav på olika grupper vore förödande, skriver ansvariga för kunskapsprovet för läkare vid Umeå universitet ihop med Socialstyrelsen.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153933 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Hultin, M., Edin, B. B. & Själander, A. (2018). Two Years Experiences of a new Swedish National Proficiency Test for Doctors of Medicine.. In: Abstract book: . Paper presented at AMEE, Basel. undee
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two Years Experiences of a new Swedish National Proficiency Test for Doctors of Medicine.
2018 (English)In: Abstract book, undee, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
undee: , 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150264 (URN)
Conference
AMEE, Basel
Available from: 2018-07-30 Created: 2018-07-30 Last updated: 2018-07-30
Crea, S., Edin, B. B., Knaepen, K., Meeusen, R. & Vitiello, N. (2017). Time-Discrete Vibrotactile Feedback Contributes to Improved Gait Symmetry in Patients With Lower Limb Amputations: Case Series. Physical Therapy, 97(2), 198-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time-Discrete Vibrotactile Feedback Contributes to Improved Gait Symmetry in Patients With Lower Limb Amputations: Case Series
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 198-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Reduced sensory feedback from lower leg prostheses results in harmful gait patterns and entails a significant cognitive burden because users have to visually monitor their locomotion. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to validate a sensory feedback device designed to help elderly patients with transfemoral amputation to improve their temporal gait symmetry after a training program aimed at associating the vibrotactile patterns with symmetrical walking. Design. This was a prospective quasi-experimental study including 3 elderly patients walking with lower leg prostheses. Methods. During training sessions, participants walked on a treadmill equipped with feedback device that controlled vibrotactile stimulators based on signals from a sensorized insole while provided with visual feedback about temporal gait symmetry. The vibrotactile stimulators delivered short-lasting, low-intensity vibrations synchronously with certain gait phase transitions. During pretraining and posttraining sessions, participants walked without visual feedback about gait symmetry under 4 conditions: with or without vibrotactile feedback while performing or not performing a secondary cognitive task. The primary outcome measure was temporal gait symmetry. Results. with <= 52 hours of training,the participants improved their temporal gait symmetry from 0.82 to 0.84 during the pretraining evaluation session to 0.98 to 1.02 during the follow-up session across all conditions. Following training, participants were able to maintain good temporal gait synmsetry, without any evidence of an increased cognitive burden. Limitations. The small sample size and short follow-up time do not allow straightforward extrapolations to larger populations or extended time periods. Conclusions. Low-cost, gait phase-specific vibrotactile feedback after training combined with visual feedback may improve the temporal gait synmsetry in patients with transfemoral amputation without representing an additional cognitive burden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOC, 2017
National Category
Physiotherapy Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133443 (URN)10.2522/ptj.20150441 (DOI)000397168800007 ()28204796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Clemente, F., D'Alonzo, M., Controzzi, M., Edin, B. B. & Cipriani, C. (2016). Non-Invasive, Temporally Discrete Feedback of Object Contact and Release Improves Grasp Control of Closed-Loop Myoelectric Transradial Prostheses. IEEE transactions on neural systems and rehabilitation engineering, 24(12), 1314-1322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-Invasive, Temporally Discrete Feedback of Object Contact and Release Improves Grasp Control of Closed-Loop Myoelectric Transradial Prostheses
Show others...
2016 (English)In: IEEE transactions on neural systems and rehabilitation engineering, ISSN 1534-4320, E-ISSN 1558-0210, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1314-1322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human grasping and manipulation control critically depends on tactile feedback. Without this feedback, the ability for fine control of a prosthesis is limited in upper limb amputees. Although various approaches have been investigated in the past, at present there is no commercially available device able to restore tactile feedback in upper limb amputees. Based on the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy we present a device able to deliver short-lasting vibrotactile feedback to transradial amputees using commercially available myoelectric hands. The device (DESC-glove) comprises sensorized thimbles to be placed on the prosthesis digits, a battery-powered electronic board, and vibrating units embedded in an arm-cuff being transiently activated when the prosthesis makes and breaks contact with objects. The consequences of using the DESC-glove were evaluated in a longitudinal study. Five transradial amputees were equipped with the device for onemonth at home. Through a simple test proposed here for the first time-the virtual eggs test-we demonstrate the effectiveness of the device for prosthetic control in daily life conditions. In the future the device could be easily exploited as an add-on to complement myoelectric prostheses or even embedded in prosthetic sockets to enhance their control by upper limb amputees.

Keywords
Haptic interface, sensory substitution, upper limb prosthetics, virtual eggs test, wearable technology
National Category
Medical Equipment Engineering Medical Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130466 (URN)10.1109/TNSRE.2015.2500586 (DOI)000390559600005 ()26584497 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-24 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Delhaye, B., Barrea, A., Edin, B. B., Lefèvre, P. & Thonnard, J.-L. (2016). Surface strain measurements of fingertip skin under shearing. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 13(115), Article ID 20150874.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surface strain measurements of fingertip skin under shearing
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 13, no 115, article id 20150874Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The temporal evolution of surface strain, resulting from a combination of normal and tangential loading forces on the fingerpad, was calculated from high-resolution images. A customized robotic device loaded the fingertip with varying normal force, tangential direction and tangential speed. We observed strain waves that propagated from the periphery to the centre of the contact area. Consequently, different regions of the contact area were subject to varying degrees of compression, stretch and shear. The spatial distribution of both the strains and the strain energy densities depended on the stimulus direction. Additionally, the strains varied with the normal force level and were substantial, e.g. peak strains of 50% with a normal force of 5 N, i.e. at force levels well within the range of common dexterous manipulation tasks. While these observations were consistent with some theoretical predictions from contact mechanics, we also observed substantial deviations as expected given the complex geometry and mechanics of fingertips. Specifically, from in-depth analyses, we conclude that some of these deviations depend on local fingerprint patterns. Our data provide useful information for models of tactile afferent responses and background for the design of novel haptic interfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Royal Society Publishing, 2016
Keywords
skin mechanics, friction, touch, tactile perception
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119674 (URN)10.1098/rsif.2015.0874 (DOI)000373034300003 ()
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A. S., Pruszynski, J. A., Edin, B. B. & Westberg, K.-G. (2014). Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw. Journal of Neurophysiology, 112(5), 1067-1073
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw
2014 (English)In: Journal of Neurophysiology, ISSN 0022-3077, E-ISSN 1522-1598, Vol. 112, no 5, p. 1067-1073Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reflex responses in jaw opening muscles can be evoked when a brittle object cracks between the teeth and suddenly unloads the jaw. We hypothesized that this reflex response is flexible and, as such, is modulated according to the instructed goal of biting through an object. Study participants performed two different biting tasks when holding a peanut-half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut-half only (single-split task) and, in the other task, they were asked to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split task). In both tasks, the peanut split evoked a jaw opening muscle response, quantified from EMG recordings of the digastric muscle in a window 20-60 ms following peanut split. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the jaw opening muscle response in the single-split trials was about twice the size of the jaw opening muscle response in the double-split trials. A linear model that predicted the jaw opening muscle response on a single trial basis indicated that task settings played a significant role in this modulation but also that the pre-split digastric muscle activity contributed to the modulation. These findings demonstrate that, like reflex responses to mechanical perturbations in limb muscles, reflex responses in jaw muscles not only show gain-scaling but also are modulated by subject intent.

Keywords
EMG, jaw-opening reflex, motor control, reflex modulation, trigeminal
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-89697 (URN)10.1152/jn.00133.2014 (DOI)000341687200005 ()24899675 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-10 Created: 2014-06-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Cipriani, C., Segil, J. L., Clemente, F., Weir, R. F. F. & Edin, B. (2014). Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand. Experimental Brain Research, 232(11), 3421-3429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 232, no 11, p. 3421-3429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions.

Keywords
Sensorimotor control, Human, Hand, Tactile afferents, Sensory substitution, Sensory feedback
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96807 (URN)10.1007/s00221-014-4024-8 (DOI)000343916400005 ()24992899 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Luciw, M. D., Jarocka, E. & Edin, B. B. (2014). Multi-channel EEG recordings during 3,936 grasp and lift trials with varying weight and friction. Scientific Data, 1, Article ID 140047.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-channel EEG recordings during 3,936 grasp and lift trials with varying weight and friction
2014 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 1, article id 140047Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

WAY-EEG-GAL is a dataset designed to allow critical tests of techniques to decode sensation, intention, and action from scalp EEG recordings in humans who perform a grasp-and-lift task. Twelve participants performed lifting series in which the object's weight (165, 330, or 660 g), surface friction (sandpaper, suede, or silk surface), or both, were changed unpredictably between trials, thus enforcing changes in fingertip force coordination. In each of a total of 3,936 trials, the participant was cued to reach for the object, grasp it with the thumb and index finger, lift it and hold it for a couple of seconds, put it back on the support surface, release it, and, lastly, to return the hand to a designated rest position. We recorded EEG (32 channels), EMG (five arm and hand muscles), the 3D position of both the hand and object, and force/torque at both contact plates. For each trial we provide 16 event times (e.g., 'object lift-off') and 18 measures that characterize the behaviour (e. g., 'peak grip force').

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2014
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142769 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2014.47 (DOI)000209843500043 ()25977798 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Westberg, K.-G. & Edin, B. B. (2014). Task-dependent control of the jaw during food splitting in humans. Journal of Neurophysiology, 111, 2614-2623
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Task-dependent control of the jaw during food splitting in humans
2014 (English)In: Journal of Neurophysiology, ISSN 0022-3077, E-ISSN 1522-1598, Vol. 111, p. 2614-2623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although splitting of food items between the incisors often requires high bite forces, rarely do the teeth harmfully collide when the jaw quickly closes after split. Previous studies indicate that the force-velocity relationship of the jaw closing muscles principally explains the prompt dissipation of jaw closing force. Here, we asked whether people could regulate the dissipation of jaw closing force during food splitting. We hypothesized that such regulation might be implemented via differential recruitment of masseter muscle portions situated along the anteroposterior axis because these portions will experience a different shortening velocity during jaw closure. Study participants performed two different tasks when holding a peanut-half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut-half only (single-split trials) and, in the other, to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split trials). In double-split trials following the peanut split, the intensity of the tooth impact on the chocolate piece was on average 2.5 times greater than in single-split trials, indicating a substantially greater loss of jaw closing force in the single-split trials. We conclude that control of jaw closing force dissipation following food splitting depends on task demands. Consistent with our hypothesis, converging neurophysiological and morphometric data indicated that this control involved a differential activation of the jaw closing masseter muscle along the anteroposterior axis. These latter findings suggest that the regulation of jaw closing force after sudden unloading of the jaw exploits masseter muscle compartmentalization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The American Physiological Society, 2014
Keywords
EMG, bite force, human, mastication, muscles
National Category
Physiology Neurosciences
Research subject
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91661 (URN)10.1152/jn.00797.2013 (DOI)000339171700020 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-3128
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-08-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications