umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Bergström, Erik
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Sundell, C.-G., Bergström, E. & Larsén, K. (2019). Low back pain and associated disability in Swedish adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 29, 393-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low back pain and associated disability in Swedish adolescents
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, p. 393-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) defined as ache or pain in the lowest part of the back is a common experience among people all over the world. The lifetime prevalence is reported to be as high as 84%, and the prevalence of LBP seems to be almost the same among adolescents as among adults. The risk for having LBP later in life if you experienced LBP in adolescence is high.

Material and Methods: In this cross‐sectional study of 2550 students aged 16‐20 years, we used the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire for the analysis of musculo‐skeletal symptoms. We studied gender difference, prevalence, and disability of Low back pain. We also studied differences in LBP in adolescent athletes depending on hours spent on sports or physical activity.

Results: Significantly, more girls than boys had had problems sometimes during their life. Those who participated in sports reported LBP to a significantly higher extent than those who were physically inactive in their spare time. Gender and spare time sports were important risk factors for getting LBP some time in life. There was a higher risk for girls to have low back pain problems more than 30 days or daily the last year if they had had low back pain some time earlier in life.

Conclusion: This study shows that low back pain (LBP) is common among Swedish adolescents, more common among girls than boys. High sport activity was associated with the risk of having LBP, length of time with LBP, and disability due to LBP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
low back pain, adoloscents, disability, back trouble, epidemiology, female, male, sports, Swedish, young people
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Sports Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154449 (URN)10.1111/sms.13335 (DOI)000458294800008 ()30421820 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Joffer, J., Flacking, R., Bergström, E., Randell, E. & Jerdén, L. (2019). Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 785.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 785Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Social position, traditionally measured by objective data on socioeconomic status (SES), is linked to health status in adults. In adolescents, the association is more uncertain and there are some studies suggesting that subjective social status (SSS) might be more adequate in relation to health. This study aimed to examine associations between SSS in school, SES and self-rated health (SRH) in adolescent boys and girls.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional research design with quantitative survey data was used. The study involved 705 Swedish adolescents in upper secondary school (17–18-year-olds). SRH was measured with a single-item question and SSS by a question where adolescents were asked to assess their social position within their school. Formal education level of the parents was used as a proxy for objective SES. Univariable and multivariable ordinal regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between SRH and SSS in school and SES.

Results: In the multivariable analysis, SSS in school was positively associated with SRH, whereas no significant association between SES and SRH was found. The proportion of adolescents with high SRH increased with higher steps on the SSS ladder. Significant gender differences were found in that boys rated their SRH and SSS in school higher than girls did.

Conclusions: The study shows that self-rated health in adolescents is related to perceived social position in school. Subjective social status in school seems to be a useful health-related measure of social position in adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Adolescents, Gender, Health status, Self-rated health, Socioeconomic status, Subjective social status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161715 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-7140-3 (DOI)000472845800005 ()31221114 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FAS dnr 2009-0292
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
García-Moya, I., Johansson, K., Ragnarsson, S., Bergström, E. & Petersen, S. (2018). School experiences in relation to emotional and conduct problems in adolescence: a 3-year follow up study. European Journal of Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School experiences in relation to emotional and conduct problems in adolescence: a 3-year follow up study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Mental health in adolescents has become a major public health issue. This study examined school experiences in relation to mental health (emotional problems and conduct problems) from early to middle adolescence.

Methods: This longitudinal 3-year follow up study used data from the Swedish Study of Health in School Children in Umeå. Analyses were conducted in 1379 participants that were attending grade six in 2003 or 2006 (age 12 years). KIDSCREEN-52 was used to assess school experiences and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for emotional and conduct problems. Statistical analyses included repeated measures ANOVA and multiple linear regressions.

Results: Positive school experiences decreased while emotional and conduct problem scores increased from grades six to nine. Positive school experiences were negatively associated with emotional and conduct problem scores and contributed to the explanation of mental health scores in middle adolescence after controlling for background factors. When baseline mental health problem scores were taken into account the association with early school experiences disappeared (except for conduct problems in boys). However, incorporating concurrent school experiences in the analysis increased the levels of explanation for emotional and conduct problem scores further.

Conclusions: The results of this study confirm that school experiences are linked to emotional and conduct problems. That link may be stronger for conduct problems. In addition, the association of school experiences in early adolescence with later mental health may be overridden by concurrent school experiences in middle adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154112 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky244 (DOI)30496393 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-04-16
Stenmark, H., Bergström, E., Hägglöf, B., Öhman, A. & Petersen, S. (2016). Mental problems and their socio-demographic determinants in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a country with high gender and income equality. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(1), 18-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental problems and their socio-demographic determinants in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a country with high gender and income equality
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: Mental problems and their potential socio-demographic determinants were investigated in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a high-income country in the top of income- and gender-equality rankings.

METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 1465 schoolchildren in grades 3 and 6. Mental health was measured by the Child Behavior Checklist and the Youth Self Report (Total problems and 14 specific problem areas). Potential socio-demographic determinants were sex, parental education and occupation, family structure, and immigrant status.

RESULTS: Mental problems were present in 14% of the sixth graders and in 7% of the third graders. In grade 3, the mean total problem score was lower in girls than in boys, but the prevalence of problems at a subclinical/clinical level did not differ by sex. Furthermore, in nine to 13 of the 14 specific problem areas, problems were equally distributed by sex, parental education, parental occupation, immigrant status, and family structure. In grade 6, both the total mean score and the overall odds of subclinical/clinical problems were similar in girls and boys. Likewise, in all the specific problem areas, problems were evenly distributed by parental education and occupation, and only independently associated with immigrant status and family structure in one problem area. In five specific problem areas, boys had higher odds of problems than girls.

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that also in a relatively wealthy and equal country such as Sweden, mental problems are a significant child public health issue. The association between socio-demographic background and mental problems seems to be rather weak, but differ dependent on the type of mental problem in focus.

Keywords
adolescent, anxiety, aggression, attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, child, conduct disorder, depression, mental disorders, prevalence, socio-demographic factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110310 (URN)10.1177/1403494815603544 (DOI)000369969000005 ()26392422 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-20 Created: 2015-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waenerlund, A.-K., Stenmark, H., Bergström, E., Hägglöf, B., Öhman, A. & Petersen, S. (2016). School experiences may be important determinants of mental health problems in middle childhood: a Swedish longitudinal population-based study. Acta Paediatrica, 105(4), 407-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School experiences may be important determinants of mental health problems in middle childhood: a Swedish longitudinal population-based study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimLittle is known about the association between school experiences and mental health in young schoolchildren. This study explored the cross-sectional and prospective associations between children's school experiences and mental health in middle childhood. MethodsWe gathered comprehensive population-based data on the school experiences and mental health of 592 schoolchildren attending grades three and six in Sweden (ages approximately nine and 12 years). The KIDSCREEN questionnaire was used to measure school experiences in both age groups while the Child Behavior Checklist and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire measured mental health in grades three and six, respectively. ResultsChildren with problematic school experiences in grade three had an approximately two times higher odds for concurrent total, internalised, externalised, attention-hyperactivity and social problems. They also had a 1.5-2.5 higher odds for these mental health problems three years later. Likewise, there was an association between problematic school experiences in grade three and lower levels of prosocial behaviour three years later. These associations were shown in both boys and girls, but were particularly pronounced in girls. ConclusionThis study indicated that school experiences in young schoolchildren may be important determinants of concurrent and later mental health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Child, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychosocial factors, Schools
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119061 (URN)10.1111/apa.13326 (DOI)000371892200022 ()26742093 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nygren, K., Bergström, E., Janlert, U. & Nygren, L. (2014). Adolescent self-reported health in relation to school factors: a multilevel analysis. Journal of School Nursing, 30(2), 114-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent self-reported health in relation to school factors: a multilevel analysis
2014 (English)In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 114-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to examine school-related determinants of self-reported health among adolescents. Questionnaire survey data comprising 4,972 students, Grades 7 through 9, from 20 schools in northern Sweden were used. Also, complimentary data about each school were collected from the Swedish National Agency for Education. Using multilevel logistic regression analyses, results showed that most variation in self-reported health was explained by individual-level differences. Truancy, bullying, and poor relations with teachers significantly increased the odds ratio of reporting poor general health, for boys and for girls. Most variables at the school level, for example, school size and student-teacher ratio, did not render significant associations with students' self-reported health. In conclusion, this study indicates that health promotion at school, including school health services, may benefit from focusing primarily on individual-level determinants of health, that is, students' relations to peers and teachers, without ignoring that bullying and weak student-teacher relationships also may induce school-level interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
adolescent health, compulsory school, logistic regression, multilevel modeling
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71408 (URN)10.1177/1059840513489709 (DOI)000332846700005 ()23674554 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84896262537 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2007-0595
Available from: 2013-05-28 Created: 2013-05-28 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Flacking, R., Jerden, L., Bergström, E. & Starrin, B. (2014). 'In or Out'-On the Dynamic between Acceptance and Rejection and its Influence on Health in Adolescent Girls. Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 22(3), 291-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'In or Out'-On the Dynamic between Acceptance and Rejection and its Influence on Health in Adolescent Girls
2014 (English)In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 291-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescent girls' subjective health, or well-being, is of international concern as the frequency of psychological and psychosomatic complaints is continuously increasing in several countries world-wide. The causes of this development are still obscure. The aim of this study was to explore well-being and strategies for increased well-being among adolescent girls. Grounded Theory method was used, in which in-depth interviews were held with 18 adolescent girls, 17-18 years of age. Results showed that striving for acceptance and avoiding rejection were central for their well-being. When rejection was experienced, emotions of stress-shame were recognized, a phenomena we call the stress-shame cycle. In the struggle to prevent rejection and to become accepted, the girls strived to boost their social attractiveness by impression management.

Keywords
girls, Grounded Theory, health, qualitative, shame, status, stress, teenagers, well-being
National Category
Other Social Sciences Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95883 (URN)10.1177/1103308814534043 (DOI)000342825600005 ()
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Joffer, J., Burell, G., Bergström, E., Stenlund, H., Sjörs, L. & Jerdén, L. (2014). Predictors of smoking among Swedish adolescents. BMC Public Health, 14, 1296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of smoking among Swedish adolescents
Show others...
2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. 1296-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Smoking most often starts in adolescence, implying that understanding of predicting factors for smoking initiation during this time period is essential for successful smoking prevention. The aim of this study was to examine predicting factors in early adolescence for smoking in late adolescence.

METHODS: Longitudinal cohort study, involving 649 Swedish adolescents from lower secondary school (12-13 years old) to upper secondary school (17-18 years old). Tobacco habits, behavioural, intra- and interpersonal factors and socio-demographic variables were assessed through questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify predicting factors.

RESULTS: Smoking prevalence increased from 3.3% among 12-13 year olds to 25.1% among 17-18 year olds. Possible predictors of smoking were: female sex, lower parental education, poorer family mood, poorer self-rated health, poorer self-esteem, less negative attitude towards smoking, binge drinking, snus use and smoking. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, female sex (OR 1.64, CI 1.08-2.49), medium and low self-esteem (medium: OR 1.57, CI 1.03-2.38, low: 2.79, CI 1.46-5.33), less negative attitude towards smoking (OR 2.81, CI 1.70-4.66) and ever using snus (OR 3.43, CI 1.78-6.62) remained significant independent predicting factors.

CONCLUSIONS: The study stresses the importance of strengthening adolescents' self-esteem, promoting anti-smoking attitudes in early adolescence, as well as avoidance of early initiation of snus. Such measures should be joint efforts involving parents, schools, youth associations, and legislating authorities.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98496 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-14-1296 (DOI)000347855900001 ()25518992 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Fors, R., Persson, M., Bergström, E., Stenlund, H., Stymne, B. & Stenberg, B. (2012). Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 92(6), 664-668
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of life-style practices in adolescents and their association with nickel allergy. Upper secondary school pupils (n = 4,376; 15-23 years) were patch-tested for nickel aller-gy, follow-ing completion of a questionnaire (answered by 6,095). Almost 86% girls and 21% of boys reported piercing. More girls (6%) than boys (3%) had a tattoo. Twenty-six percent of the girls and 18% of the boys were regular smokers. Vegetarian/vegan diets were reported by 20% of girls and by 6% of boys. Piercing, female gender, and vocational programme increased the risk of nickel allergy, whereas orthodontic appliance treat-ment prior to piercing reduced the risk of nickel allergy. Pupils in vocational programmes had the highest prevalence of nickel allergy. Lifestyle behaviours are interconnected and cluster in subgroups of adolescents. Female sex, piercing and choice of educational programme are prominent lifestyle markers. A trend shift is observed, where more girls than boys report tattooing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for the Publication of Acta Dermato - Venereologica, 2012
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57100 (URN)10.2340/00015555-1305 (DOI)22278701 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-07-05 Created: 2012-07-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nygren, K., Bergström, E., Janlert, U. & Nygren, L. (2012). Parents matter: but relations to parents do not explain gender differences in self-reported health in adolescents. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 26(4), 643-653
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents matter: but relations to parents do not explain gender differences in self-reported health in adolescents
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 643-653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to explore whether parent-adolescent relations are associated to self-reported health of adolescents. Logistic regression analyses were performed on a cross-sectional data set consisting of 5060 adolescents, grades 7-9, from six municipalities in the northern part of Sweden. The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Umeå, Sweden. Results showed that, in both boys and girls, experiencing low parental demands as well as perceiving the relationship quality and the communication with parents as poor were significantly associated with having poor general health, somatic complaints and feelings of stress. In general, girls scored lower on self-reported health than boys, but our findings indicate that these gender differences could not be explained by relations to parents. In conclusion, relations to parents play an important role for self-reported health of adolescents. Although no causal-effect statements can be determined in this study, it is implied that there is a need for health professionals, such as school nurses, school welfare officers, etc., to pay special attention to parent-adolescent relations in their work with adolescents.

National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-53100 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.00973.x (DOI)
Available from: 2012-03-29 Created: 2012-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications