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Petersen, Solveig
Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Högberg, B., Strandh, M., Petersen, S. & Johansson, K. (2019). Education system stratification and health complaints among school-aged children. Social Science and Medicine, 220, 159-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education system stratification and health complaints among school-aged children
2019 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 220, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research shows that the school environment is an important social determinant of health among children and adolescents. However, we know virtually nothing of the health consequences of national education systems and policies, for example the stratification of pupils by academic ability. This study aimed to investigate if education system stratification is related to self-reported psychological and somatic health complaints of pupils aged 11 to 15, and social inequalities in such health complaints.

Survey data from the Health Behaviors of School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, covering 33 countries and more than 180 000 pupils in primary and lower secondary school, were used. Multilevel models showed that education system stratification was not associated with the average levels of health complaints of pupils, but cross-level interaction effects showed that stratification moderated the relationship between social background and health complaints, such that inequalities in health complaints were smaller in countries with more stratified systems. Moreover, this moderating effect was mediated by the school learning environmentand social relations in school. Specifically, social inequalities in school pressure, academic self-concept, school climate, and school satisfaction were smaller in more stratified education systems, which in turn accounted for smaller inequalities in health complaints in these countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Health complaints, Health inequalities, Education systems, Schools Children, Adolescents, Multilevel, Comparative research
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155320 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.11.007 (DOI)000456222400017 ()30445341 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00048Swedish Research Council, 2018-03870_3
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Baroudi, M., Petersen, S., Namatovu, F., Annelie, C., Ivarsson, A. & Norström, F. (2019). Preteen children’s health related quality of life in Sweden: changes over time and disparities between different sociodemographic groups. BMC Public Health, 19, Article ID 139.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preteen children’s health related quality of life in Sweden: changes over time and disparities between different sociodemographic groups
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2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Assessing disparities in health-related quality of Life (HRQoL) is important as a part of health-related disparities in the society. The aim of this study was to explore HRQoL among 12-year-olds in Sweden in terms of differences between years 2005 and 2009 and disparities related to sociodemographic background.

Methods: During the school years 2005 and 2009, a total of 18,325 sixth grade students in Sweden were invited to a celiac disease screening study; 13,279 agreed to participate. Jointly with the celiac screening, the children answered a questionnaire that included EuroQol 5 Dimensions-youth (EQ-5D-Y) and their parents responded to separate questionnaires about their own and their child’s country of birth, family structure, their employment status, occupation, and education. In total 11,009 child-parent questionnaires were collected. Logistic regression was used to study differences in HRQoL between 2005 and 2009, and between various sociodemographic subgroups.

Results: Compared with 2005, children in 2009 reported more pain (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.1–1.3) and more mood problems (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.2–1.5). In general, girls reported more pain and mood problems and had more disparities than boys. There were no significant differences based on parents’ occupation, however, children of parents with low or medium education levels reported less “mood problems” than those of parents with high education levels (OR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92) and (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.73–0.96), respectively. A slight variation was seen in HRQoL between children with different migration background. Girls living in small municipalities reported more pain (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.14–2.01), and problems performing usual activities (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 2.08–6.84), compared to girls living in large municipalities. In addition, children living with two parents had less mood problems than children living in other family constellations.

Conclusion: More children reported pain and mood problems in 2009 compared with 2005. To study future trends, health outcomes among children in Sweden should continue to be reported periodically. More efforts should be invested to increase the awareness of health-related disparities as highlighted in this study especially for girls living in small municipalities and children of parents with high education level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Preteen children health, Health inequity, Quality of life, HRQoL, Sociodemographic disparities
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155944 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-6429-6 (DOI)000457471800001 ()30704442 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2004-7093Swedish Research Council, 521-2007-2953Swedish Research Council Formas, 222-2004-1918Swedish Research Council Formas, 222-2007-1394
Available from: 2019-02-01 Created: 2019-02-01 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Ragnarsson, S., Myléus, A., Hurtig, A.-K., Sjöberg, G., Rosvall, P.-Å. & Petersen, S. (2019). Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review. Journal of School Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review
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2019 (English)In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Recurrent pain and school failures are common problems in children visiting the school nurses office. The overall aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between recurrent pain and academic achievement in school-aged children. Literature was searched in seven electronic databases and in relevant bibliographies. Study selection, data extraction, and study and evidence quality assessments were performed systematically with standardized tools. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and 13 verified an association between recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, and musculoskeletal pain) and negative academic achievement. Two longitudinal studies indicated a likely causal effect of pain on academic achievement. All studies had substantial methodological drawbacks and the overall quality of the evidence for the identified associations was low. Thus, children’s lack of success in school may be partly attributed to recurrent pain problems. However, more highquality studies are needed, including on the direction of the association and its moderators and mediators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
recurrent pain, school-aged children, school failure, school nursing
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157030 (URN)10.1177/1059840519828057 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2019-04-03
Malakellis, M., Hoare, E., Sanigorski, A., Crooks, N., Allender, S., Nichols, M., . . . Millar, L. (2018). Authors' response to Letter to the Editor: ANZJPH-2017-220 [Letter to the editor]. Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 42(2), 215-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Authors' response to Letter to the Editor: ANZJPH-2017-220
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2018 (English)In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 215-215Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145748 (URN)10.1111/1753-6405.12767 (DOI)000429410700018 ()29281167 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Löfgren, H. O., Petersen, S., Nilsson, K., Padyab, M., Ghazinour, M. & Hägglöf, B. (2017). Effects of Parent Training Programs on Parental Stress in a General Swedish Population Sample. Psychology, 8(5), 700-716, Article ID 75044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Parent Training Programs on Parental Stress in a General Swedish Population Sample
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2017 (English)In: Psychology, ISSN 2152-7180, E-ISSN 2152-7199, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 700-716, article id 75044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is a confirmatory study that assessed the effects of parent training programs on parental stress in a general population. There is a need to repeat and confirm earlier findings to acquire solid knowledge for policy stakeholders. In a quasi-experimental design, self-reported data were gathered at three occasions from 83 parents of children between the ages from one to ten years. These parents had responded to advertisements of parent training programs, and were matched to a comparison group of 83 parents chosen from a governmental database. Parent training program based upon behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, Adlerian and family system-theories. Parental stress due to incompetence, role restriction, social isolation, spousal relationship problems, and health problems were measured by the Swedish Parenthood Stress Ques- tionnaire that is based on the Parent Stress Index Scale. The data indicated a reduction of stress in the sub-scale of health problems among parents in the intervention group with an effect size of 0.33, however, no other subscale showed the intervention as a significant variable when controlling for confounding variables. This study adds on the accumulated knowledge of supporting interventions for parents. We conclude that parent training programs have a significant effect on the stress components of parental health when implemented in real-life settings. 

Keywords
Parental Training Program, Parental Stress, Universal Prevention, SPSQ
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133099 (URN)10.4236/psych.2017.85045 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Löfgren, H. O., Padyab, M., Ghazinour, M., Nilsson, K., Petersen, S. & Hägglöf, B. (2017). Healthier Parents: Effects of Parent Training Programs on Mental Health. International Journal of Social Work and Human Services Practice, 5(2), 70-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthier Parents: Effects of Parent Training Programs on Mental Health
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Social Work and Human Services Practice, ISSN 2332-6832, E-ISSN 2332-6840, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 70-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aims to investigate the effects of Parent Training Programs on the mental health of parents with children aged between 1 and 17 in a universal preventive setting. The intervention group included 279 parents who were assigned to five professionally administered interventions, which included 5–10 two-hour sessions; they were then compared to 702 parents in the comparison group without intervention. The improvement in general mental health was statistically significant in the intervention group compared to the comparison group. The findings suggest that evidence-based parent training programs enhance well-being in parents without indicated problems. However further exploration of preventive training programs for parents are needed.

Keywords
Parental Training Program, Universal Interventions, General Mental Health, GHQ
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136134 (URN)10.13189/ijrh.2017.050204 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Malakellis, M., Hoare, E., Sanigorski, A., Crooks, N., Allender, S., Nichols, M., . . . Millar, L. (2017). School-based systems change for obesity prevention in adolescents: outcomes of the Australian Capital Territory "It's Your Move!'. Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, 41(5), 490-496
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School-based systems change for obesity prevention in adolescents: outcomes of the Australian Capital Territory "It's Your Move!'
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2017 (English)In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 490-496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The Australian Capital Territory It's Your Move!' (ACT-IYM) was a three-year (2012-2014) systems intervention to prevent obesity among adolescents. Methods: The ACT-IYM project involved three intervention schools and three comparison schools and targeted secondary students aged 12-16 years. The intervention consisted of multiple initiatives at individual, community, and school policy level to support healthier nutrition and physical activity. Intervention school-specific objectives related to increasing active transport, increasing time spent physically active at school, and supporting mental wellbeing. Data were collected in 2012 and 2014 from 656 students. Anthropometric data were objectively measured and behavioural data self-reported. Results: Proportions of overweight or obesity were similar over time within the intervention (24.5% baseline and 22.8% follow-up) and comparison groups (31.8% baseline and 30.6% follow-up). Within schools, two of three the intervention schools showed a significant decrease in the prevalence of overweight and obesity (p<0.05). Conclusions: There was some evidence of effectiveness of the systems approach to preventing obesity among adolescents. Implications for public health: The incorporation of systems thinking has been touted as the next stage in obesity prevention and public health more broadly. These findings demonstrate that the use of systems methods can be effective on a small scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
Adolescence, systems intervention, obesity, weight status, schools, health promotion
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140883 (URN)10.1111/1753-6405.12696 (DOI)000412292500008 ()28749562 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stenmark, H., Bergström, E., Hägglöf, B., Öhman, A. & Petersen, S. (2016). Mental problems and their socio-demographic determinants in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a country with high gender and income equality. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(1), 18-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental problems and their socio-demographic determinants in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a country with high gender and income equality
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2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: Mental problems and their potential socio-demographic determinants were investigated in young schoolchildren in Sweden, a high-income country in the top of income- and gender-equality rankings.

METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 1465 schoolchildren in grades 3 and 6. Mental health was measured by the Child Behavior Checklist and the Youth Self Report (Total problems and 14 specific problem areas). Potential socio-demographic determinants were sex, parental education and occupation, family structure, and immigrant status.

RESULTS: Mental problems were present in 14% of the sixth graders and in 7% of the third graders. In grade 3, the mean total problem score was lower in girls than in boys, but the prevalence of problems at a subclinical/clinical level did not differ by sex. Furthermore, in nine to 13 of the 14 specific problem areas, problems were equally distributed by sex, parental education, parental occupation, immigrant status, and family structure. In grade 6, both the total mean score and the overall odds of subclinical/clinical problems were similar in girls and boys. Likewise, in all the specific problem areas, problems were evenly distributed by parental education and occupation, and only independently associated with immigrant status and family structure in one problem area. In five specific problem areas, boys had higher odds of problems than girls.

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that also in a relatively wealthy and equal country such as Sweden, mental problems are a significant child public health issue. The association between socio-demographic background and mental problems seems to be rather weak, but differ dependent on the type of mental problem in focus.

Keywords
adolescent, anxiety, aggression, attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, child, conduct disorder, depression, mental disorders, prevalence, socio-demographic factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110310 (URN)10.1177/1403494815603544 (DOI)000369969000005 ()26392422 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-20 Created: 2015-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waenerlund, A.-K., Stenmark, H., Bergström, E., Hägglöf, B., Öhman, A. & Petersen, S. (2016). School experiences may be important determinants of mental health problems in middle childhood: a Swedish longitudinal population-based study. Acta Paediatrica, 105(4), 407-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School experiences may be important determinants of mental health problems in middle childhood: a Swedish longitudinal population-based study
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2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimLittle is known about the association between school experiences and mental health in young schoolchildren. This study explored the cross-sectional and prospective associations between children's school experiences and mental health in middle childhood. MethodsWe gathered comprehensive population-based data on the school experiences and mental health of 592 schoolchildren attending grades three and six in Sweden (ages approximately nine and 12 years). The KIDSCREEN questionnaire was used to measure school experiences in both age groups while the Child Behavior Checklist and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire measured mental health in grades three and six, respectively. ResultsChildren with problematic school experiences in grade three had an approximately two times higher odds for concurrent total, internalised, externalised, attention-hyperactivity and social problems. They also had a 1.5-2.5 higher odds for these mental health problems three years later. Likewise, there was an association between problematic school experiences in grade three and lower levels of prosocial behaviour three years later. These associations were shown in both boys and girls, but were particularly pronounced in girls. ConclusionThis study indicated that school experiences in young schoolchildren may be important determinants of concurrent and later mental health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Child, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychosocial factors, Schools
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119061 (URN)10.1111/apa.13326 (DOI)000371892200022 ()26742093 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Omma, L. & Petersen, S. (2015). Health-related quality of life in indigenous Sami schoolchildren in Sweden. Acta Paediatrica, 104, 75-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life in indigenous Sami schoolchildren in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, p. 75-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in indigenous Sami schoolchildren in Sweden and its associations with sex, age, enculturation and ethnicity-related negative treatment.

METHODS: The study population was comprised of all children in grades 6-12 (ages 12-18 years) who attended specific Sami school programmes in Sweden. HRQOL was measured by the Kidscreen-52 self-report form, which was filled in at school (n = 121).

RESULTS: The indigenous Sami children in Sweden experienced lower HRQOL than Swedish children in general, with regard to their school situation, financial resources, parents' relations, physical well-being and social support from peers. In Sami children, functioning and well-being generally decreased by older age group and girls reported lower physical well-being, more negative feelings and more negative self-perception than boys. Finally, more than half of the Sami children had experienced ethnicity-related negative treatment, and these children reported a robustly lower functioning and well-being compared with those without this experience.

CONCLUSION: In some aspects of HRQOL, indigenous Sami schoolchildren with an explicit ethnic identity experienced less favourable functioning and well-being than Swedish children in general, which is worrisome. A high degree of ethnicity-related negative treatment may partly explain this lower HRQOL in Sami children.

Keywords
adolescent, discrimination, indigenous, Sami, well-being
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97346 (URN)10.1111/apa.12786 (DOI)000346987300023 ()25169118 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2014-12-16 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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