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Littbrand, Håkan
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Öhlin, J., Ahlgren, A., Folkesson, R., Gustafson, Y., Littbrand, H., Olofsson, B. & Toots, A. (2020). The association between cognition and gait in a representative sample of very old people - the influence of dementia and walking aid use. BMC Geriatrics, 20, Article ID 34.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between cognition and gait in a representative sample of very old people - the influence of dementia and walking aid use
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2020 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 20, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cognition has been related with gait speed in older adults; however, studies involving the oldest age group, where many have mobility disability and cognitive impairment, are few. The aim was to investigate the association between global cognitive function and gait speed in a representative sample of very old people, and whether the association was affected by dementia, and walking aid use.

Method: This cross-sectional study included 1317 participants, mean age 89.4 years, and 68% women, from the Umeå85+/Gerontological Regional Database. Self-paced gait speed was measured over 2.4 m, with or without walking aids, and global cognitive function with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The association between cognition and gait speed was analyzed using multiple linear regression and stratified according to dementia. The influence of missing gait speed values was explored using multiple imputation. An interaction analysis was performed to investigate the influence of walking aid use.

Results: In comprehensively adjusted analyses, MMSE associated with gait speed (unstandardized β (β) 0.011 m/s, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.009, 0.013, p < 0.001) in the total sample. No association was found in people with dementia (β 0.003 m/s, 95%CI = 0.000, 0.006, p = 0.058), until missing gait speed values were compensated for by multiple imputation (β 0.007 m/s, 95% [CI] = 0.002, 0.011, p = 0.002). In interaction analysis the use of walking aids attenuated the association between cognition and gait speed (β − 0.019 m/s, 95%CI = − 0.024, − 0.013, p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Global cognitive function appears to associate with gait speed in very old people. However, in people with dementia selection bias was indicated since unless missing gait speed values were accounted for no association was observed. Walking aid use attenuated cognitive load, which may not apply to walking in daily activities, and requires further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Gait speed, Cognition, Walking aids, Dementia, Aged 80 and over
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168829 (URN)10.1186/s12877-020-1433-3 (DOI)000513522000003 ()32005103 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Sondell, A., Littbrand, H., Holmberg, H., Lindelöf, N. & Rosendahl, E. (2019). Is the Effect of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Functional Balance Influenced by Applicability and Motivation Among Older People with Dementia in Nursing Homes?. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 23(10), 1011-1020
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the Effect of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program on Functional Balance Influenced by Applicability and Motivation Among Older People with Dementia in Nursing Homes?
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2019 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1011-1020Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Objectives: Exercise can be an important way of maintaining balance function in people with dementia, but further investigation is needed to determine the optimal way of exercising. The objective was to evaluate whether exercise applicability (i.e., attendance, exercise intensity, and adverse events) and motivation were associated with the effect on functional balance of a high-intensity functional exercise program for older people with dementia in nursing homes.

Design, Setting and Participants: Exercise intervention participants (n = 81; 60 women, 21 men) from a randomized controlled trial (UMDEX) were included. Their mean age was 84 and mean Mini-Mental State Examination score was 15.

Intervention: Groups of 3–8 participants participated in the High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) Program, with 5 sessions per 2-week period, for 4 months (total, 40 sessions).

Measurements: Outcome was the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), assessed at baseline and follow up, and the score difference, dichotomized to classify participants into two groups: responders (≥5-point increase) and non-responders (<5-point increase). Target variables were measures of applicability and motivation. Associations between each target variable and the outcome were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Baseline characteristics and new medical conditions developing during the intervention period were compared between responders and non-responders and included in the analyses when p < 0.10.

Results: The BBS score was 28.6 ± 14.3 at baseline and 31.2 ± 15.3 at follow up, with the difference between follow-up and baseline scores ranging from −35 to 24. Twenty-nine (35.8%) participants were responders. The multivariable models showed no significant association between responders vs. non-responders and any target variable.

Conclusion: Participation in a 4-month high-intensity functional exercise program can improve balance in many individuals with dementia in nursing homes, despite the progressiveness of dementia disorders and several co-existing medical conditions. Predicting balance exercise response based on applicability and motivation seem not to be possible, which lends no support for excluding this group from functional exercise, even when exercise intensity or motivation is not high.

Keywords
Dementia, exercise, postural balance, residential facilities
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165681 (URN)10.1007/s12603-019-1269-8 (DOI)000489514700001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6
Available from: 2019-12-10 Created: 2019-12-10 Last updated: 2020-05-13Bibliographically approved
Sondell, A., Rosendahl, E., Gustafson, Y., Lindelöf, N. & Littbrand, H. (2019). The Applicability of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program among Older People with Dementia living in Nursing Homes. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, 42(4), E16-E24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Applicability of a High-Intensity Functional Exercise Program among Older People with Dementia living in Nursing Homes
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, ISSN 1539-8412, E-ISSN 2152-0895, Vol. 42, no 4, p. E16-E24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and Purpose: Exercise programs for people with dementia need to be optimized. We therefore evaluated the applicability of a high-intensity functional exercise program among people with dementia in nursing homes with regard to attendance, achieved exercise intensity, adverse events, a focus on dementia type, and whether symptoms of dementia or other medical conditions common in this population were associated with program applicability.

Methods: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden. Ninety-three people with dementia (mean [SD] Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15.4 [3.4]) were randomized to the exercise intervention. Thirty-four participants had Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 59 non-Alzheimer's dementia (non-AD). High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) program was conducted in groups of 3 to 8 participants. Two physiotherapists led 5 sessions (45 minutes each) per fortnight for 4 months (total 40 sessions).

Results: Median attendance rate was 82.5%. Lower limb strength exercises were performed at high or medium intensity at a median interquartile range of 94.7% (77.8%-100%) of attended sessions. Participants with non-AD performed more sessions with high intensity in strength exercises than participants with AD (median interquartile range, 53.8% [25.7%-80%] vs 34.9% [2.02%-62.9%]; P = .035). Balance exercises were performed at high intensity at a median interquartile range of 75% (33.3%-88.6%). Adverse events (all minor and temporary, mostly musculoskeletal) occurred during the exercise sessions in 16% of attended sessions. Low motivation was the most common barrier for attendance. Buildup period, low motivation, and pain were common barriers for achieving high intensity in balance and strength exercises, and fear was a barrier in balance exercises. Of medical conditions, only behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including apathy, were negatively associated with applicability.

Conclusion: A group-based, supervised, and individualized high-intensity functional exercise program seems to be applicable with regard to attendance, achieved intensity, and adverse events during the exercise sessions, in people with mild to moderate dementia in nursing homes. Effective strategies to enhance motivation to participate in exercise, as well as prevention and treatment of pain and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, are important when promoting exercise participation in this population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
dementia, exercise, long-term care, mobility limitation, rehabilitation
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153347 (URN)10.1519/JPT.0000000000000199 (DOI)000497704600003 ()29851748 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072946590 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVårdal FoundationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Toots, A., Wiklund, R., Littbrand, H., Nordin, E., Nordström, P., Lundin-Olsson, L., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2019). The Effects of Exercise on Falls in Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 20(7), 835-842
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Exercise on Falls in Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 835-842Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate exercise effects on falls in people with dementia living in nursing homes, and whether effects were dependent on sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. A further aim was to describe the occurrence of fall-related injuries.

DESIGN: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise study was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden and included 141 women and 45 men, a mean age of 85 years, and with a mean Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15.

INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to the high-intensity functional exercise program or a seated attention control activity; each conducted 2-3 times per week for 4 months.

MEASURES: Falls and fall-related injuries were followed for 12 months (after intervention completion) by blinded review of medical records. Injuries were classified according to severity.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 118(67%) of the participants fell 473 times in total. At the interim 6-month follow-up, the incidence rate was 2.7 and 2.8 falls per person-year in exercise and control group, respectively, and at 12-month follow-up 3.0 and 3.2 falls per person-year, respectively. Negative binomial regression analyses indicated no difference in fall rate between groups at 6 or 12 months (incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-1.7, P = .838 and incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6, P = .782, respectively). No differences in exercise effects were found according to sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. Participants in the exercise group were less likely to sustain moderate/serious fall-related injuries at 12-month follow-up (odds ratio 0.31, 95% CI 0.10-0.94, P = .039).

CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: In older people with dementia living in nursing homes, a high-intensity functional exercise program alone did not prevent falls when compared with an attention control group. In high-risk populations, in which multimorbidity and polypharmacy are common, a multifactorial fall-prevention approach may be required. Encouraging effects on fall-related injuries were observed, which merits future investigations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Alzheimer disease, Falls, dementia, exercise, fractures, residential facilitie
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159680 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2018.10.009 (DOI)000472596100008 ()30503589 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVårdal FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Sondell, A., Rosendahl, E., Nilsson Sommar, J., Littbrand, H., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Lindelöf, N. (2018). Motivation to participate in high-intensity functional exercise compared with a social activity in older people with dementia in nursing homes. PLoS ONE, 13(11), Article ID e0206899.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivation to participate in high-intensity functional exercise compared with a social activity in older people with dementia in nursing homes
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0206899Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Motivation to participate in exercise among people with dementia has not been well studied. The symptoms of dementia, including apathy, may lead to low motivation to participate in exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the motivation of older people with dementia to participate in a high-intensity exercise program compared with motivation of those participating in a social group activity.

Methods: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise Study (UMDEX) was a cluster-randomized controlled intervention trial including 186 people (mean age; 85, 75% female) with dementia in nursing homes. Participants were randomized to participate in the High-Intensity Functional Exercise (HIFE) Program (n = 93) or a seated social group activity (n = 93). The activities were conducted in groups of 3–8 participants for 45 minutes, five times per two-week period, for 4 months (40 sessions in total). Participants’ motivation to go to and during activity sessions were assessed by the activity leaders and nursing homes staff using a five-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed using cumulative link mixed models.

Results: Motivation was high or very high during 61.0% of attended sessions in the exercise group and 62.6% in the social activity group. No overall significant difference between groups was observed, but motivation increased over time in the exercise group and decreased in the social activity group (p < 0.05). Motivation during the sessions was significantly higher than motivation to go to the sessions, especially in the exercise group [OR 2.39 (95% CI 2.38–2.40) and 1.50 (95% CI 1.32–1.70), respectively].

Conclusions: Among older people with dementia in nursing homes, motivation to participate in a high-intensity functional exercise program seems to be high, comparable to motivation to participate in a social activity, and increase over time. Since motivation during activity sessions was higher than motivation to go to sessions the promotion of strategies to encourage people with dementia to join exercise groups is of great importance.

National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153346 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0206899 (DOI)000450138500071 ()30427894 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVårdal FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, H., Lundin-Olsson, L., Littbrand, H., Gustafson, Y., Rosendahl, E. & Toots, A. (2017). Cognitive function and walking velocity in people with dementia: a comparison of backward and forward walking. Gait & Posture, 58, 481-486
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive function and walking velocity in people with dementia: a comparison of backward and forward walking
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2017 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 58, p. 481-486Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How forward and backward walking, both central to everyday life, relate to cognition are relatively unexplored in people with dementia. This study aimed to investigate if forward and backward walking velocity respectively, associated with global cognition and executive function in people with dementia, and whether the association differed according to walking aid use or dementia type. Using a cross-sectional design, 161 participants (77% women), a mean Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, and mean age of 85.5 years and living in nursing homes were included. Self-paced forward walking (FW) and backward walking (BW) velocity over 2.4 m was measured. Global cognitive outcome measurements included MMSE and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog). Executive function was measured using Verbal Fluency (VF). In comprehensively adjusted multivariate linear regression analyses, FW was independently associated with VF (p = 0.001), but not MMSE (p = 0.126) or ADAS-Cog (p = 0.818). BW was independently associated with VF (p = 0.043) and MMSE (p = 0.022), but not ADAS-Cog (p = 0.519). Interaction analyses showed that the association between BW velocity and executive function were stronger in participants who walked without a walking aid. No associations differed according to dementia type. In conclusion, executive function appears important to walking velocity, both forward and backward, in people with dementia with mild to moderately severe cognitive impairment. Global cognitive function was associated with backward walking only, perhaps due to it being more challenging. The association between BW velocity and executive function differed according to use of walking aids, which appeared to attenuate the association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Cognition, Walking aids, Frail elderly, Dementia, Walking speed, Nursing homes
National Category
Neurology Orthopaedics Sport and Fitness Sciences Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142473 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.09.009 (DOI)000415234200080 ()28926815 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Toots, A., Littbrand, H., Boström, G., Hörnsten, C., Holmberg, H., Lundin-Olsson, L., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2017). Effects of exercise on cognitive function in older people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of alzheimers disease, 60(1), 323-332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of exercise on cognitive function in older people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: Journal of alzheimers disease, ISSN 1387-2877, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 323-332Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although physical exercise has been suggested to influence cognitive function, previous exercise studies show inconsistent results in people with dementia. Objectives: To investigate effects of exercise on cognitive function in people with dementia. Method: The Umea a Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study, a cluster-randomized controlled trial, was set in 16 nursing homes in Umea, Sweden. One hundred-and-forty-one women and 45 men with dementia; mean age of 85 y and mean MiniMental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15, were randomized to a High-Intensity Functional Exercise program or a seated attention control activity. Blinded assessors measured global cognitive function using the MMSE and the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale -Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), and executive function using Verbal fluency (VF) at baseline and 4 months (directly after intervention completion), and MMSE and VF at 7 months. Results: Linear mixed models showed no between-group effects in mean difference from baseline (95% confidence intervals, CI) at 4 months in MMSE (-0.27; 95% CI -1.4 to 0.87, p = 0.644), ADAS-Cog (-1.04, 95% CI -4 to 1.92, p = 0.491), or VF (-0.53, 95% CI -1.42 to 0.35, p = 0.241) or at 7 months in MMSE (-1.15, 95% CI -2.32 to 0.03, p = 0.056) or VF (-0.18, 95% CI -1.09 to 0.74, p = 0.707). Conclusion: A 4-month, high-intensity functional exercise program had no superior effects on global cognition or executive function in people with dementia living in nursing homes when compared with an attention control activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2017
Keywords
Cognition, dementia, exercise, residential facilities
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128727 (URN)10.3233/JAD-170014 (DOI)000408582800026 ()28800328 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally published in manuscript form with title [Effects of exercise on cognitive function in older people with dementia: a randomized controlled study]

Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Brännström, J., Boström, G., Rosendahl, E., Nordström, P., Littbrand, H., Lövheim, H. & Gustafson, Y. (2017). Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: investigating sex differences. BMC Pharmacology & Toxicology, 18, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: investigating sex differences
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2017 (English)In: BMC Pharmacology & Toxicology, E-ISSN 2050-6511, Vol. 18, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Psychotropic drugs are common among old people with dementia, and have been associated with increased mortality. Previous studies have not investigated sex differences in this risk. This study was conducted to analyse associations between the use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and benzodiazepines and 2-year mortality in old people with dementia, and to investigate sex differences therein.

Methods: In total, 1037 participants (74% women; mean age, 89 years) with dementia were included from four cohort studies and followed for 2 years. Data were collected through home visits and medical records. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyse associations between ongoing baseline drug use and mortality. Multiple possible confounders were evaluated and adjusted for.

Results: In fully adjusted models including data from the whole population, no association between baseline psychotropic drug use and increased 2-year mortality was seen. Significant sex differences were found in mortality associated with antidepressant use, which was protective in men, but not in women (hazard ratio [HR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40–0.92 and HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.87–1.38, respectively). The interaction term for sex was significant in analyses of benzodiazepine use, with a higher mortality risk among men than among women.

Conclusions: Among old people with dementia, ongoing psychotropic drug use at baseline was not associated with increased mortality in analyses adjusted for multiple confounders. Sex differences in mortality risk associated with antidepressant and benzodiazepine use were seen, highlighting the need for further investigation of the impact of sex.

Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, cohort study, dementia, gender, mortality, old age, psychotropic drugs, vascular dementia
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119011 (URN)10.1186/s40360-017-0142-9 (DOI)000402184000001 ()28545507 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally published in manuscript form with title "Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: a gender-sensitive analysis"

Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Toots, A., Littbrand, H., Holmberg, H., Nordström, P., Lundin-Olsson, L., Gustafson, Y. & Rosendahl, E. (2017). Walking aids moderate exercise effects on gait speed in people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 18(3), 227-233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Walking aids moderate exercise effects on gait speed in people with dementia: a randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of exercise on gait speed, when tested using walking aids and without, and whether effects differed according to amount of support in the test.

DESIGN: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise (UMDEX) study was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: One hundred forty-one women and 45 men (mean age 85 years) with dementia, of whom 145 (78%) habitually used walking aids.

INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to the high-intensity functional exercise program or a seated attention control activity.

MEASUREMENTS: Blinded assessors measured 4-m usual gait speed with walking aids if any gait speed (GS), and without walking aids and with minimum amount of support, at baseline, 4 months (on intervention completion), and 7 months.

RESULTS: Linear mixed models showed no between-group effect in either gait speed test at 4 or 7 months. In interaction analyses exercise effects differed significantly between participants who walked unsupported compared with when walking aids or minimum support was used. Positive between-group exercise effects on gait speed (m/s) were found in subgroups that walked unsupported at 4 and 7 months (GS: 0.07, P = .009 and 0.13, P < .001; and GS test without walking aids: 0.05, P = .011 and 0.07, P = .029, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: In people with dementia living in nursing homes exercise had positive effects on gait when tested unsupported compared with when walking aids or minimum support was used. The study suggests that the use of walking aids in gait speed tests may conceal exercise effects.

Keywords
mobility limitations, residential facilities, alzheimer disease, rehabilitation, frail elderly
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127495 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2016.09.003 (DOI)000398943400008 ()27810267 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-0775
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Boström, G., Hörnsten, C., Brännström, J., Conradsson, M., Nordström, P., Allard, P., . . . Littbrand, H. (2016). Antidepressant use and mortality in very old people. International psychogeriatrics, 28(7), 1201-1210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antidepressant use and mortality in very old people
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2016 (English)In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 1201-1210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Antidepressant treatment may increase the risk of death. The association between antidepressants and mortality has been evaluated in community-dwelling older people, but not in representative samples of very old people, among whom dementia, multimorbidity, and disability are common.

METHODS: Umeå 85+/GERDA study participants (n = 992) aged 85, 90, and ≥95 years were followed for up to five years. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze mortality risk associated with baseline antidepressant treatment, adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS: Mean age was 89 years; 27% of participants had dementia, 20% had stroke histories, 29% had heart failure, and 16% used antidepressants. In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, antidepressant use was associated with a 76% increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41-2.19). Adding adjustment for Geriatric Depression Scale score, HR was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.29-2.03). The association was not significant when adjusting for additional confounding factors (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 0.85-1.38). Interaction analyses in the fully adjusted model revealed a significant interaction between sex and antidepressant use (HR: 1.76; 95% CI, 1.05-2.94). Among male and female antidepressant users, the HRs for death were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.47-1.24) and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.97-1.70), respectively.

CONCLUSION: Among very old people, baseline antidepressant treatment does not seem to be independently associated with increased mortality risk. However, the risk may be different in men and women. This difference and the potential risk of initial treatment require further investigation in future cohort studies of very old people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016
Keywords
depression, antidepressants, age 80 and over, dementia, residential facilities, frail elderly, epidemiology, mortality
National Category
Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-119010 (URN)10.1017/S104161021600048X (DOI)000382387500016 ()26987958 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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