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BETA
Saveman, Britt-IngerORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3716-6445
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Publications (10 of 79) Show all publications
Stenberg, M., Stålnacke, B.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2019). Family Illness Trajectory During Seven Years After A Severe Traumatic Brain Injury-Family Interviews. Paper presented at The International Brain Injury Association’s 13th World Congress on Brain Injury, Toronto, Canada, 13−16 March, 2019. Brain Injury, 33, 147-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Illness Trajectory During Seven Years After A Severe Traumatic Brain Injury-Family Interviews
2019 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 33, p. 147-147Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Severe traumatic brain injury, long-term perspective, family interviews
National Category
Neurology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159384 (URN)10.1080/02699052.2019.1608749 (DOI)000466897000307 ()
Conference
The International Brain Injury Association’s 13th World Congress on Brain Injury, Toronto, Canada, 13−16 March, 2019
Note

Supplement: 1

Meeting abstract: 0413

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, M., Stålnacke, B.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2019). Long-Term Follow-Up Observation Study 7 Years after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Northern Sweden. Brain Injury, 33, 161-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Follow-Up Observation Study 7 Years after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Northern Sweden
2019 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 33, p. 161-161Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Neurology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159383 (URN)10.1080/02699052.2019.1608749 (DOI)000466897000333 ()
Note

Supplement: 1

Meeting abstract: 0442

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Stålnacke, B.-M., Saveman, B.-I. & Stenberg, M. (2019). Long-Term Follow-Up of Disability, Cognitive, and Emotional Impairments after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. Behavioural Neurology, 2019, Article ID 9216931.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Follow-Up of Disability, Cognitive, and Emotional Impairments after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
2019 (English)In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, Vol. 2019, article id 9216931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To assess the clinical course of disability, cognitive, and emotional impairments in patients with severe TBI (s-TBI) from 3 months to up to 7 years post trauma. Methods. A prospective cohort study of s-TBI in northern Sweden was conducted. Patients aged 18-65 years with acute Glasgow Coma Scale 3-8 were assessed with the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Barrow Neurological Institute Screen for Higher Cerebral Functions (BNIS) at 3 months, 1 year, and 7 years after the injury. Results. The scores on both GOSE and BNIS improved significantly from 3 months (GOSE mean: 4.4 +/- 2.3, BNIS mean: 31.5 +/- 7.0) to 1 year (GOSE mean: 5.5 +/- 2.7, p=0.003, BNIS mean: 33.2 +/- 6.3, p=0.04), but no significant improvement was found from 1 year to 7 years (GOSE mean: 4.7 +/- 2.8, p=0.13, BNIS mean: 33.5 +/- 3.9, p=0.424) after the injury. The BNIS subscale "speech/language" at 1 year was significantly associated with favourable outcomes on the GOSE at 7 years (OR=2.115, CI: 1.004-4.456, p=0.049). Conclusions. These findings indicate that disability and cognition seem to improve over time after s-TBI and appear to be relatively stable from 1 year to 7 years. Since cognitive function on some of the BNIS subscales was associated with outcome on the GOSE, these results indicate that both screening and follow-up of cognitive function could be of importance for the rehabilitation of persons with s-TBI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164648 (URN)10.1155/2019/9216931 (DOI)000485989300001 ()31534558 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072378106 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Hylander, J., Saveman, B.-I., Björnstig, U. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2019). Prehospital management provided by medical on-scene commanders in tunnel incidents in Oslo, Norway: an interview study. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 27(1), Article ID 78.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital management provided by medical on-scene commanders in tunnel incidents in Oslo, Norway: an interview study
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High demands are placed on the emergency medical services to handle rescue operations in challenging environments such as tunnels. In Oslo, Norway a specialised management function within the emergency medical services, the medical on-scene commander, in line with the command structure within the police and fire brigade, might support or take over command and control from the ambulance incident officer arriving as the first ambulance personnel on scene. The aim was to shed light on the emergency medical service experiences from real tunnel incidents described by the Oslo medical on-scene commanders.

Methods: Interviews were conducted with six of the seven medical on-scene commander in Oslo, Norway. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

Results: The overall theme was "A need for mutual understanding of a tunnel incident". The medical on-scene commander provided tactical support, using their special knowledge of risk objects and resources in the local area. They established operation plans with other emergency services (the police and fire brigade) in a structured and trustful way, thus creating a fluent and coordinated mission. Also, less time was spent arguing at the incident site. By socialising also outside ordinary working hours, a strong foundation of reliance was built between the different parties. A challenge in recent years has been the increasing ordinary workload, giving less opportunity for training and exchange of experiences between the three emergency services.

Conclusions: The enthusiastic pioneers within the three emergency services have created a sense of familiarity and trust. A specially trained medical on-scene commander at a tunnel incident is regarded to improve the medical management. To improve efficiency, this might be worth studying for other emergency medical services with similar conditions, i.e. tunnels in densely populated areas.

Keywords
Medical on-scene commander, Prehospital emergency care, Tunnel incidents
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163681 (URN)10.1186/s13049-019-0649-8 (DOI)000483063100001 ()31429788 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Pedersen, I., Enarsson, E., Saveman, B.-I. & Bölenius, K. (2019). The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’. Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 17(2), 146-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’
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2019 (English)In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous blood specimen collection is an important practical task that results in an analysis response that often leads to a clinical decision. Errors due to inaccurate venous blood specimen collection are frequently reported and can jeopardize patient safety because inaccurate specimens may result in a delayed or incorrect diagnosis and treatment. However, few healthcare personnel have written an error report regarding venous blood specimen collection practices. The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of healthcare personnel with incident reporting of venous blood specimen collection practices in primary health care. Our study is based on 30 individual interviews with healthcare personnel from 10 primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Personnel experiences of incident reporting were summarized in three categories; Uncertainties in the planning and organization, High workload and low priority and, A need for support and guidance. More specifically, barriers hinder personnel in reporting mistakes. An interpretation based on the results is that surrounding circumstances within the organization influence whether personnel report mistakes or not. The result indicates a need for parallel systems, to identify and report errors or near-misses to prevent mistakes. Processed incidents should be returned promptly to the personnel to use as a learning experience. Having a valid questionnaire and a key person to write an incident report, might reduce the burden on the health care staff and increase the numbers of incident reports and patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Health care, incident reporting, patient safety, venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163716 (URN)10.1080/14773996.2019.1640963 (DOI)000489739800005 ()
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Saveman, B.-I. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2019). The medical perspective on mining incidents: Interviews with emergency medical service (EMS) personnel. International Journal of Emergency Services, 8(3), 236-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The medical perspective on mining incidents: Interviews with emergency medical service (EMS) personnel
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Emergency Services, ISSN 2047-0894, E-ISSN 2047-0908, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine emergency medical service (EMS) personnel’s perceptions and experiences of managing underground mining injury incidents.

Design/methodology/approach: In total, 13 EMS personnel were interviewed according to a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings: An underground mining environment was described as unfamiliar and unsafe and, with no guidelines for operational actions in an extreme environment, such as underground mines, the EMS personnel were uncertain of their role. They therefore became passive and relied on the rescue service and mining company during a major incident. However, the medical care was not considered to be different from any other prehospital care, although a mining environment would make the situation more difficult and it would take longer for the mine workers to be placed under definitive care.

Originality/value: This study complements earlier studies by examining the EMS personnel’s perceptions and experiences of major incidents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2019
Keywords
Preparedness, Emergency medical services, Major incident, Mines
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165262 (URN)10.1108/IJES-02-2019-0006 (DOI)000493804300002 ()
Available from: 2019-11-18 Created: 2019-11-18 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Sundin, K., Pusa, S., Jonsson, C., Saveman, B.-I. & Östlund, U. (2018). Envisioning the future as expressed within family health conversations by families of persons suffering from stroke. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(2), 707-714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Envisioning the future as expressed within family health conversations by families of persons suffering from stroke
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 707-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The whole family is affected when a person suffers from stroke, but few studies have focused on families' expectations following the stroke.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to illuminate what persons with stroke and their family members talk about in Family Health Conversations (FamHCs) with focus on the future and how nurses leading these conversations apprehended the families' future shown in closing letters based on these conversations.

METHOD: In this study, seven families with a member ≤65 years who had suffered a stroke participated in FamHC in their homes after the person with stroke had been discharged from the rehabilitation clinic. The FamHC comprised a series of three conversations conducted every other week and a closing letter sent by the nurses to the family to conclude the series. In this study, the third conversations were recorded and they and the closing letters were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULT: The family members including the persons with stroke were found to be able to tell their stories and express their feelings, worries, losses, hopes and wishes for the future within the context of the Family Health Conversations. Support within the family was highlighted as essential to the satisfactory management of future situations.

CONCLUSION: The persons with stroke and their belonging family members' vision of the future was reflected over in the light of theories about beliefs, possible selves, hope and suffering, and the findings highlight the need for broader use of family conversations to support persons with stroke and their families to manage the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
cerebrovascular disorder, closing letters, family health conversations, family nursing, future, relatives, stroke, suffering
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139878 (URN)10.1111/scs.12501 (DOI)000436254800027 ()28851069 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Sjödin Eriksson, E., Lindh, V. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Family Health Conversations at a pediatric oncology center: a way for families to rebalance the situation. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 38, e59-e65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Health Conversations at a pediatric oncology center: a way for families to rebalance the situation
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 38, p. e59-e65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The study aimed to describe and understand adult family members' experiences of participating in a Family Health Conversation (FamHC) when a child is diagnosed with cancer.

Design and Methods: Twelve individual interviews were performed with adult family members who had participated in a FamHC. During the interviews each interviewee was a spokesman for his or her respective family. Thereby the family was included as a system. The interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic approach.

Results: The analysis resulted in four themes: "To unburden the burden," "Seeing things in a new light," "To be seen the way you are," and "Talking to someone who is both within and alongside." Finally an overarching theme evolved, " To rebalance the situation" revealing the meaning of taking part in the FamHC.

Conclusion: All participants considered the FamHC to be valuable. It was surprising that such a relatively small investment of two family conversations and a closing letter could have such significance for the families in their difficult situation.

Practice Implications: With training, clinical nurses can use a well-established structured interview process such as the Family Health Conversation to help family members to gain insight into each other's experiences, which increase their ability to cope and regain control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Family Health Conversation, FamHC, Family Systems Nursing, hermeneutic analysis, pediatric oncology nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144854 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2017.10.004 (DOI)000423035000012 ()29037772 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Rolfsman, E., Frånberg, G.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices. Education 3-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices
2018 (English)In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Approximately 36,000 Swedish children seek medical care annually because of injuries during school time. The purpose of this field study is to investigate risky outdoor play at the school yard and to describe teachers’ perceptions of risk and safety in relation to learning and development. The study includes observations of children (6–12 years old) during outdoor activities as part of the school’s activities and includes focus-group interviews with teachers and children. Children were seen climbing high in play facilities, speeding down slides, or competing with sticks in the woods. Different views of risk and safety among the participants influence outdoor play activities. Teachers’ knowledge of risk seems to be derived from common sense and personal experiences rather than from a professional perspective. A joint approach of educational and medicine disciplines is desirable when it comes to children’s health and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Outdoor play, injury prevention, risk, safety, social representation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Pedagogy Pedagogical Work Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153899 (URN)10.1080/03004279.2018.1551912 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-04-30
Engström, K. G., Angrén, J., Björnstig, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Mass casualty incidents in the underground mining industry: applying the Haddon Matrix on an integrative literature review. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 12(1), 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass casualty incidents in the underground mining industry: applying the Haddon Matrix on an integrative literature review
2018 (English)In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, E-ISSN 1938-744X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Underground mining is associated with obvious risks that can lead to mass casualty incidents. Information about such incidents was analyzed in an integrated literature review.

METHODS: A literature search (1980-2015) identified 564 modern-era underground mining reports from countries sharing similar occupational health legislation. These reports were condensed to 31 reports after consideration of quality grading and appropriateness to the aim. The Haddon matrix was used for structure, separating human factors from technical and environmental details, and timing.

RESULTS: Most of the reports were descriptive regarding injury-creating technical and environmental factors. The influence of rock characteristics was an important pre-event environmental factor. The organic nature of coal adds risks not shared in hard-rock mines. A sequence of mechanisms is commonly described, often initiated by a human factor in interaction with technology and step-wise escalation to involve environmental circumstances. Socioeconomic factors introduce heterogeneity. In the Haddon matrix, emergency medical services are mainly a post-event environmental issue, which were not well described in the available literature. The US Quecreek Coal Mine incident of 2002 stands out as a well-planned rescue mission.

CONCLUSION: Evaluation of the preparedness to handle underground mining incidents deserves further scientific attention. Preparedness must include the medical aspects of rescue operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
mass casualty incident, medical emergency, preparedness, rescue, underground mining
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137579 (URN)10.1017/dmp.2017.31 (DOI)000428215300023 ()28592339 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-05 Created: 2017-07-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
The network for health promoting conversations with families experiencing chronic illness [2010-07080_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3716-6445

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