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BETA
Saveman, Britt-IngerORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3716-6445
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Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Stenberg, M., Stålnacke, B.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2019). Family Illness Trajectory During Seven Years After A Severe Traumatic Brain Injury-Family Interviews. Paper presented at The International Brain Injury Association’s 13th World Congress on Brain Injury, Toronto, Canada, 13−16 March, 2019. Brain Injury, 33, 147-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Illness Trajectory During Seven Years After A Severe Traumatic Brain Injury-Family Interviews
2019 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 33, p. 147-147Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Severe traumatic brain injury, long-term perspective, family interviews
National Category
Neurology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159384 (URN)10.1080/02699052.2019.1608749 (DOI)000466897000307 ()
Conference
The International Brain Injury Association’s 13th World Congress on Brain Injury, Toronto, Canada, 13−16 March, 2019
Note

Supplement: 1

Meeting abstract: 0413

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Stenberg, M., Stålnacke, B.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2019). Long-Term Follow-Up Observation Study 7 Years after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Northern Sweden. Brain Injury, 33, 161-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Follow-Up Observation Study 7 Years after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Northern Sweden
2019 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 33, p. 161-161Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Neurology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159383 (URN)10.1080/02699052.2019.1608749 (DOI)000466897000333 ()
Note

Supplement: 1

Meeting abstract: 0442

Available from: 2019-06-10 Created: 2019-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Pedersen, I., Enarsson, E., Saveman, B.-I. & Bölenius, K. (2019). The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’. Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 17(2), 146-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’
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2019 (English)In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous blood specimen collection is an important practical task that results in an analysis response that often leads to a clinical decision. Errors due to inaccurate venous blood specimen collection are frequently reported and can jeopardize patient safety because inaccurate specimens may result in a delayed or incorrect diagnosis and treatment. However, few healthcare personnel have written an error report regarding venous blood specimen collection practices. The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of healthcare personnel with incident reporting of venous blood specimen collection practices in primary health care. Our study is based on 30 individual interviews with healthcare personnel from 10 primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Personnel experiences of incident reporting were summarized in three categories; Uncertainties in the planning and organization, High workload and low priority and, A need for support and guidance. More specifically, barriers hinder personnel in reporting mistakes. An interpretation based on the results is that surrounding circumstances within the organization influence whether personnel report mistakes or not. The result indicates a need for parallel systems, to identify and report errors or near-misses to prevent mistakes. Processed incidents should be returned promptly to the personnel to use as a learning experience. Having a valid questionnaire and a key person to write an incident report, might reduce the burden on the health care staff and increase the numbers of incident reports and patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Health care, incident reporting, patient safety, venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163716 (URN)10.1080/14773996.2019.1640963 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Sundin, K., Pusa, S., Jonsson, C., Saveman, B.-I. & Östlund, U. (2018). Envisioning the future as expressed within family health conversations by families of persons suffering from stroke. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(2), 707-714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Envisioning the future as expressed within family health conversations by families of persons suffering from stroke
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 707-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The whole family is affected when a person suffers from stroke, but few studies have focused on families' expectations following the stroke.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to illuminate what persons with stroke and their family members talk about in Family Health Conversations (FamHCs) with focus on the future and how nurses leading these conversations apprehended the families' future shown in closing letters based on these conversations.

METHOD: In this study, seven families with a member ≤65 years who had suffered a stroke participated in FamHC in their homes after the person with stroke had been discharged from the rehabilitation clinic. The FamHC comprised a series of three conversations conducted every other week and a closing letter sent by the nurses to the family to conclude the series. In this study, the third conversations were recorded and they and the closing letters were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULT: The family members including the persons with stroke were found to be able to tell their stories and express their feelings, worries, losses, hopes and wishes for the future within the context of the Family Health Conversations. Support within the family was highlighted as essential to the satisfactory management of future situations.

CONCLUSION: The persons with stroke and their belonging family members' vision of the future was reflected over in the light of theories about beliefs, possible selves, hope and suffering, and the findings highlight the need for broader use of family conversations to support persons with stroke and their families to manage the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
cerebrovascular disorder, closing letters, family health conversations, family nursing, future, relatives, stroke, suffering
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139878 (URN)10.1111/scs.12501 (DOI)000436254800027 ()28851069 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-25 Created: 2017-09-25 Last updated: 2019-05-07Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Sjödin Eriksson, E., Lindh, V. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Family Health Conversations at a pediatric oncology center: a way for families to rebalance the situation. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 38, e59-e65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Health Conversations at a pediatric oncology center: a way for families to rebalance the situation
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 38, p. e59-e65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The study aimed to describe and understand adult family members' experiences of participating in a Family Health Conversation (FamHC) when a child is diagnosed with cancer.

Design and Methods: Twelve individual interviews were performed with adult family members who had participated in a FamHC. During the interviews each interviewee was a spokesman for his or her respective family. Thereby the family was included as a system. The interviews were analyzed using a hermeneutic approach.

Results: The analysis resulted in four themes: "To unburden the burden," "Seeing things in a new light," "To be seen the way you are," and "Talking to someone who is both within and alongside." Finally an overarching theme evolved, " To rebalance the situation" revealing the meaning of taking part in the FamHC.

Conclusion: All participants considered the FamHC to be valuable. It was surprising that such a relatively small investment of two family conversations and a closing letter could have such significance for the families in their difficult situation.

Practice Implications: With training, clinical nurses can use a well-established structured interview process such as the Family Health Conversation to help family members to gain insight into each other's experiences, which increase their ability to cope and regain control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Family Health Conversation, FamHC, Family Systems Nursing, hermeneutic analysis, pediatric oncology nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144854 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2017.10.004 (DOI)000423035000012 ()29037772 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Rolfsman, E., Frånberg, G.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices. Education 3-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices
2018 (English)In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Approximately 36,000 Swedish children seek medical care annually because of injuries during school time. The purpose of this field study is to investigate risky outdoor play at the school yard and to describe teachers’ perceptions of risk and safety in relation to learning and development. The study includes observations of children (6–12 years old) during outdoor activities as part of the school’s activities and includes focus-group interviews with teachers and children. Children were seen climbing high in play facilities, speeding down slides, or competing with sticks in the woods. Different views of risk and safety among the participants influence outdoor play activities. Teachers’ knowledge of risk seems to be derived from common sense and personal experiences rather than from a professional perspective. A joint approach of educational and medicine disciplines is desirable when it comes to children’s health and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Outdoor play, injury prevention, risk, safety, social representation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Pedagogy Pedagogical Work Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153899 (URN)10.1080/03004279.2018.1551912 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-04-30
Engström, K. G., Angrén, J., Björnstig, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Mass casualty incidents in the underground mining industry: applying the Haddon Matrix on an integrative literature review. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 12(1), 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass casualty incidents in the underground mining industry: applying the Haddon Matrix on an integrative literature review
2018 (English)In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, E-ISSN 1938-744X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Underground mining is associated with obvious risks that can lead to mass casualty incidents. Information about such incidents was analyzed in an integrated literature review.

METHODS: A literature search (1980-2015) identified 564 modern-era underground mining reports from countries sharing similar occupational health legislation. These reports were condensed to 31 reports after consideration of quality grading and appropriateness to the aim. The Haddon matrix was used for structure, separating human factors from technical and environmental details, and timing.

RESULTS: Most of the reports were descriptive regarding injury-creating technical and environmental factors. The influence of rock characteristics was an important pre-event environmental factor. The organic nature of coal adds risks not shared in hard-rock mines. A sequence of mechanisms is commonly described, often initiated by a human factor in interaction with technology and step-wise escalation to involve environmental circumstances. Socioeconomic factors introduce heterogeneity. In the Haddon matrix, emergency medical services are mainly a post-event environmental issue, which were not well described in the available literature. The US Quecreek Coal Mine incident of 2002 stands out as a well-planned rescue mission.

CONCLUSION: Evaluation of the preparedness to handle underground mining incidents deserves further scientific attention. Preparedness must include the medical aspects of rescue operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
mass casualty incident, medical emergency, preparedness, rescue, underground mining
National Category
Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137579 (URN)10.1017/dmp.2017.31 (DOI)000428215300023 ()28592339 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-05 Created: 2017-07-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lukumay, G. G., Ndile, M. L., Outwater, A. H., Mkoka, D. A., Padyab, M., Saveman, B.-I. & Backteman-Erlandsson, S. (2018). Provision of post-crash first aid by traffic police in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: a cross-sectional survey. BMC Emergency Medicine, 18, Article ID 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Provision of post-crash first aid by traffic police in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: a cross-sectional survey
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2018 (English)In: BMC Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1471-227X, E-ISSN 1471-227X, Vol. 18, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The availability of prehospital trauma care is an important means of reducing serious injuries and fatalities associated with road traffic injuries (RTIs). Lay responders such as traffic police play an important role in the provision of prehospital trauma care to RTI victims, especially where there is no established prehospital care system. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate knowledge, self-reported practice, and attitudes toward post-crash first aid among traffic police officers in Tanzania.

Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania between July-September 2017 to investigate knowledge, self-reported practice and attitude among traffic police officers during provision of post-crash care. We used simple random technique to recruit 340 traffic police officers, self -administered questionnaires were used to collect data. The researchers used descriptive statistics and Pearson's chi-square tests to analyze the data.

Results: A total of 340 traffic police officers were surveyed. Nearly two thirds (65.3%) reported having had post-crash first aid on-the job training; a slightly larger proportion (70.9%) reported that they had cared for RTI victims in the previous year. The survey responses showed that, generally, traffic police officers' level of knowledge about post-crash first aid to RTI victims was low-about 3% of the surveyed officers possessed knowledge at a level considered good. Also, there was a statistically significant correlation between higher educational attainment and greater knowledgeability (p = 0.015). Almost all of the officers (96%) had a positive attitude toward providing post-crash first aid to RTI victims.

Conclusions: Improved training of Tanzania traffic police officers, by means of an updated post-crash first aid curriculum and updated resources is recommended. Also, user-friendly post-crash first aid leaflets should be provided to traffic police for their reference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Traffic police, Post-crash care, Road traffic injury
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154350 (URN)10.1186/s12873-018-0199-9 (DOI)000451397600002 ()30458715 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Doohan, I. M., Gyllencreutz, L., Björnstig, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Survivors' experiences of consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(3), 1179-1187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survivors' experiences of consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1179-1187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale: There is a lack of long-term follow-up studies focused on injured and uninjured survivors’ experiences of the recovery process after major traffic crashes.

Aim/objective: To explore survivors’ experiences of long-term physical and psychological consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash.

Methodological design and justification: A qualitative design was used to explore experiences in a 5-year follow-up study.

Research methods: Participants were 54 survivors of a bus crash with 56 survivors and six fatalities. Telephone interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The theme overarching the categories is “visible and existential marks in everyday life” and it represents the range of the crash’s influence in the survivors’ lives. The first category, “health consequences in daily life,” has four subcategories covering quick recovery, suffering in daily life, distress in traffic situations, and long-term pain. Described reasons for quick recovery among survivors were previous crisis experiences, traveling alone, being uninjured, and not being exposed to traumatic impressions. For the other survivors, being reminded of the crash caused disturbing reactions, such as sweating, anxiety, and flashbacks. Survivors avoided going by bus if they could. A group of the injured survivors were still suffering from limiting and painful injuries. The second category, “oneself and social connection,” has three subcategories that include self-awareness, impact on relationships, and connectedness. Survivors developed a stronger bond to their significant other or separated from their partner within the first couple of years. Friendships and a sense of connectedness among survivors were sources of long-lasting comfort and support.

Conclusion: There is a need for more information about disruptive long-lasting consequences, such as travel anxiety, and available treatments. Initially, health-promoting connectedness can be facilitated by treating survivors as a group of people who belong together, from the day of the crash and throughout the recovery process. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
Busskrasch, överlevande, upplevelser, erfarenheter, trafikskadehändelser, återhämtning, långtidsuppföljning
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences; health services research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140190 (URN)10.1111/scs.12563 (DOI)000445450800020 ()29436007 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Doohan, I., Björnstig, U., Östtlund, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2017). Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study. Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, 32(2), 165-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study
2017 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective The aim of this study was to explore physical and mental consequences and injury mechanisms among bus crash survivors to identify aspects that influence recovery. Methods The study participants were the total population of survivors (N=56) from a bus crash in Sweden. The study had a mixed-methods design that provided quantitative and qualitative data on injuries, mental well-being, and experiences. Results from descriptive statistics and qualitative thematic analysis were interpreted and integrated in a mixed-methods analysis. Results Among the survivors, 11 passengers (20%) sustained moderate to severe injuries, and the remaining 45 (80%) had minor or no physical injuries. Two-thirds of the survivors screened for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) risk were assessed, during the period of one to three months after the bus crash, as not being at-risk, and the remaining one-third were at-risk. The thematic analysis resulted in themes covering the consequences and varying aspects that affected the survivors' recoveries. The integrated findings are in the form of four core cases of survivors who represent a combination of characteristics: injury severity, mental well-being, social context, and other aspects hindering and facilitating recovery. Core case Avery represents a survivor who had minor or no injuries and who demonstrated a successful mental recovery. Core case Blair represents a survivor with moderate to severe injuries who experienced a successful mental recovery. Core case Casey represents a survivor who sustained minor injuries or no injuries in the crash but who was at-risk of developing PTSD. Core case Daryl represents a survivor who was at-risk of developing PTSD and who also sustained moderate to severe injuries in the crash. Conclusion The present study provides a multi-faceted understanding of mass-casualty incident (MCI) survivors (ie, having minor injuries does not always correspond to minimal risk for PTSD and moderate to severe injuries do not always correspond to increased risk for PTSD). Injury mitigation measures (eg, safer roadside material and anti-lacerative windows) would reduce the consequences of bus crashes. A well-educated rescue team and a compassionate and competent social environment will facilitate recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2017
Keywords
Emergency Medical Services, injuries, mass-casualty incident, survivors
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134251 (URN)10.1017/S1049023X16001485 (DOI)000398228600007 ()28132665 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Projects
The network for health promoting conversations with families experiencing chronic illness [2010-07080_VR]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3716-6445

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