umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Wall, Stig
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 96) Show all publications
Byass, P., Ng, N. & Wall, S. (2019). Nurturing Global Health Action through its first decade. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1569847.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurturing Global Health Action through its first decade
2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1569847Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158193 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1569847 (DOI)000457989300001 ()30727852 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-24Bibliographically approved
Schröders, J., Wall, S., Hakimi, M., Dewi, F. S., Weinehall, L., Nichter, M., . . . Ng, N. (2017). How is Indonesia coping with its epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases?: A systematic review with meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 12(6), Article ID e0179186.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How is Indonesia coping with its epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases?: A systematic review with meta-analysis
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, article id e0179186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have emerged as a huge global health problem in low- and middle-income countries. The magnitude of the rise of NCDs is particularly visible in Southeast Asia where limited resources have been used to address this rising epidemic, as in the case of Indonesia. Robust evidence to measure growing NCD-related burdens at national and local levels and to aid national discussion on social determinants of health and intra-country inequalities is needed. The aim of this review is (i) to illustrate the burden of risk factors, morbidity, disability, and mortality related to NCDs; (ii) to identify existing policy and community interventions, including disease prevention and management strategies; and (iii) to investigate how and why an inequitable distribution of this burden can be explained in terms of the social determinants of health.

METHODS: Our review followed the PRISMA guidelines for identifying, screening, and checking the eligibility and quality of relevant literature. We systematically searched electronic databases and gray literature for English- and Indonesian-language studies published between Jan 1, 2000 and October 1, 2015. We synthesized included studies in the form of a narrative synthesis and where possible meta-analyzed their data.

RESULTS: On the basis of deductive qualitative content analysis, 130 included citations were grouped into seven topic areas: risk factors; morbidity; disability; mortality; disease management; interventions and prevention; and social determinants of health. A quantitative synthesis meta-analyzed a subset of studies related to the risk factors smoking, obesity, and hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings echo the urgent need to expand routine risk factor surveillance and outcome monitoring and to integrate these into one national health information system. There is a stringent necessity to reorient and enhance health system responses to offer effective, realistic, and affordable ways to prevent and control NCDs through cost-effective interventions and a more structured approach to the delivery of high-quality primary care and equitable prevention and treatment strategies. Research on social determinants of health and policy-relevant research need to be expanded and strengthened to the extent that a reduction of the total NCD burden and inequalities therein should be treated as related and mutually reinforcing priorities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library Science, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137238 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0179186 (DOI)000404046100012 ()28632767 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-28 Created: 2017-06-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Dalmar, A. A., Hussein, A. S., Walhad, S. A., Ibrahim, A. O., Abdi, A. A., Ali, M. K., . . . Wall, S. (2017). Rebuilding research capacity in fragile states: the case of a Somali-Swedish global health initiative. Global Health Action, 10(1), Article ID 1348693.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rebuilding research capacity in fragile states: the case of a Somali-Swedish global health initiative
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1348693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an initiative to revive the previous Somali-Swedish Research Cooperation, which started in 1981 and was cut short by the civil war in Somalia. A programme focusing on research capacity building in the health sector is currently underway through the work of an alliance of three partner groups: six new Somali universities, five Swedish universities, and Somali diaspora professionals. Somali ownership is key to the sustainability of the programme, as is close collaboration with Somali health ministries. The programme aims to develop a model for working collaboratively across regions and cultural barriers within fragile states, with the goal of creating hope and energy. It is based on the conviction that health research has a key role in rebuilding national health services and trusted institutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Diaspora, Somalia, fragile states, health research training, health systems
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138141 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2017.1348693 (DOI)000407952800001 ()28799463 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, A., Kinsman, J., Johansson, K., Mohamud, K. B., Weinehall, L., Freij, L., . . . Omar, S. (2015). Healing the health system after civil unrest. Global Health Action, 8, 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healing the health system after civil unrest
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 8, p. 1-4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Diaspora, action, health systems, research collaboration, war and conflicts
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103570 (URN)10.3402/gha.v8.27381 (DOI)000352006300001 ()25828070 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-25 Created: 2015-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Blomstedt, Y., Norberg, M., Stenlund, H., Nyström, L., Lönnberg, G., Boman, K., . . . Weinehall, L. (2015). Impact of a combined community and primary care prevention strategy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a cohort analysis based on 1 million person-years of follow-up in Västerbotten County, Sweden, during 1990-2006. BMJ Open, 5(12), Article ID e009651.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of a combined community and primary care prevention strategy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: a cohort analysis based on 1 million person-years of follow-up in Västerbotten County, Sweden, during 1990-2006
Show others...
2015 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 12, article id e009651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) by comparing all eligible individuals (target group impact) according to the intention-to-treat principle and VIP participants with the general Swedish population.

DESIGN: Dynamic cohort study.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 40, 50 or 60 years, residing in Västerbotten County, Sweden, between 1990 and 2006 (N=101 918) were followed from their first opportunity to participate in the VIP until age 75, study end point or prior death.

INTERVENTION: The VIP is a systematic, long-term, county-wide cardiovascular disease (CVD) intervention that is performed within the primary healthcare setting and combines individual and population approaches. The core component is a health dialogue based on a physical examination and a comprehensive questionnaire at the ages of 40, 50 and 60 years.

PRIMARY OUTCOMES: All-cause and CVD mortality.

RESULTS: For the target group, there were 5646 deaths observed over 1 054 607 person-years. Compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 90.6% (95% CI 88.2% to 93.0%): for women 87.9% (95% CI 84.1% to 91.7%) and for men 92.2% (95% CI 89.2% to 95.3%). For CVD, the ratio was 95.0% (95% CI 90.7% to 99.4%): for women 90.4% (95% CI 82.6% to 98.7%) and for men 96.8% (95% CI 91.7 to 102.0). For participants, subject to further impact as well as selection, when compared to Sweden at large, the standardised all-cause mortality ratio was 66.3% (95% CI 63.7% to 69.0%), whereas the CVD ratio was 68.9% (95% CI 64.2% to 73.9%). For the target group as well as for the participants, standardised mortality ratios for all-cause mortality were reduced within all educational strata.

CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that the VIP model of CVD prevention is able to impact on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when evaluated according to the intention-to-treat principle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2015
Keywords
Primary care, Epidemiology, Public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113605 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009651 (DOI)000368839100125 ()26685034 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-21 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Schröders, J., Wall, S., Kusnanto, H. & Ng, N. (2015). Millennium Development Goal Four and Child Health Inequities in Indonesia: A Systematic Review of the Literature. PLoS ONE, 10(5), Article ID e0123629.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Millennium Development Goal Four and Child Health Inequities in Indonesia: A Systematic Review of the Literature
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0123629Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 calls for reducing mortality of children under-five years by two-thirds by 2015. Indonesia is on track to officially meet the MDG 4 targets by 2015 but progress has been far from universal. It has been argued that national level statistics, on which MDG 4 relies, obscure persistent health inequities within the country. Particularly inequities in child health are a major global public health challenge both for achieving MDG 4 in 2015 and beyond. This review aims to map out the situation of MDG 4 with respect to disadvantaged populations in Indonesia applying the Social Determinants of Health (SDH) framework. The specific objectives are to answer: Who are the disadvantaged populations? Where do they live? And why and how is the inequitable distribution of health explained in terms of the SDH framework?

Methods and Findings We retrieved studies through a systematic review of peer-reviewed and gray literature published in 1995-2014. The PRISMA-Equity 2012 statement was adapted to guide the methods of this review. The dependent variables were MDG 4-related indicators; the independent variable "disadvantaged populations" was defined by different categories of social differentiation using PROGRESS. Included texts were analyzed following the guidelines for deductive content analysis operationalized on the basis of the SDH framework. We identified 83 studies establishing evidence on more than 40 different determinants hindering an equitable distribution of child health in Indonesia. The most prominent determinants arise from the shortcomings within the rural health care system, the repercussions of food poverty coupled with low health literacy among parents, the impact of low household decision-making power of mothers, and the consequences of high persistent use of traditional birth attendants among ethnic minorities.

Conclusion This review calls for enhanced understanding of the determinants and pathways that create, detain, and overcome inequities in child health in resource constraint settings like Indonesia and the promotion of actionable health policy recommendations and tailored investments.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106275 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0123629 (DOI)000353943400006 ()25942491 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-07-10 Created: 2015-07-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Daar, A. S., Jacobs, M., Wall, S., Groenewald, J., Eaton, J., Patel, V., . . . Ndetei, D. (2014). Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation. Global Health Action, 7, Article ID 24589.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, article id 24589Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps). There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years.

Keywords
Africa, mental health, WHO action plan, roadmap, basic services, policy, implementation, stigma, human rights, post-2015 Agenda, UN General Assembly
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91962 (URN)10.3402/gha.v7.24589 (DOI)000338435900001 ()24931476 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-19 Created: 2014-08-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hirve, S., Verdes, E., Lele, P., Juvekar, S., Blomstedt, Y., Tollman, S., . . . Ng, N. (2014). Evaluating Reporting Heterogeneity in Self-Rated Health Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Above in India: An Anchoring Vignettes Analytic Approach. Journal of Aging and Health, 26(6), 1015-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating Reporting Heterogeneity in Self-Rated Health Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Above in India: An Anchoring Vignettes Analytic Approach
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1015-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To use anchoring vignettes to evaluate reporting heterogeneity (RH) in self-rated mobility and cognition in older adults. Method: We analyzed vignettes and self-rated mobility and cognition in 2,558 individuals aged 50 years and above. We tested for assumptions of vignette equivalence (VE) and response consistency (RC). We used a joint hierarchical ordered probit (HOPIT) model to evaluate self-rating responses for RH. Results: The assumption of VE was met except for "learning" vignettes. Higher socioeconomic status (SES) and education significantly lowered thresholds for cognition ratings. After correction for RH, women, lower SES, and older respondents were significantly more likely to report greater difficulty in mobility. The influence of age, SES, and education on thresholds was less apparent for cognition. Discussion: Our study provides strong evidence of RH in self-rated mobility and cognition. We highlight the need to formally test basic assumptions before using vignettes to adjust self-rating responses for RH.

Keywords
reporting heterogeneity; differential item functioning; mobility; cognition; self-rating; anchoring vignettes; India
National Category
Geriatrics Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-90527 (URN)10.1177/0898264314535634 (DOI)000340728600007 ()24925690 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-24 Created: 2014-06-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Horton, R., Beaglehole, R., Bonita, R., Raeburn, J., McKee, M. & Wall, S. (2014). From public to planetary health: a manifesto. The Lancet, 383(9920), 847-847
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From public to planetary health: a manifesto
Show others...
2014 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9920, p. 847-847Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87629 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60409-8 (DOI)000332399500004 ()
Available from: 2014-04-10 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Olff, M. & Wall, S. (2014). Intimate partner violence and mental health-remarks from two Chief Editors on a joint publishing venture. Global Health Action, 7(1-3), Article ID 25711.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intimate partner violence and mental health-remarks from two Chief Editors on a joint publishing venture
2014 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, no 1-3, article id 25711Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98499 (URN)10.3402/gha.v7.25711 (DOI)000341767500001 ()25226423 (PubMedID)
Note

This article is being published simultaneously in European Journal of Psychotraumatology and Global Health Action.

Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications