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Lindh Waterworth, Eva
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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Waterworth, J., Waterworth, E., Álvarez, P., Gutiérrez, J., Carús, J. L. & Garcia, S. (2016). What do elderly users want and need from fitness technologies?: Findings from the ELF@Home project. In: Daniela Villani, Pietro Cipresso, Andrea Gaggioli, Giuseppe Riva (Ed.), Integrating technology in positive psychology practice: (pp. 104-126). Hershey, USA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do elderly users want and need from fitness technologies?: Findings from the ELF@Home project
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2016 (English)In: Integrating technology in positive psychology practice / [ed] Daniela Villani, Pietro Cipresso, Andrea Gaggioli, Giuseppe Riva, Hershey, USA: IGI Global, 2016, p. 104-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is well known that physical exercise has a significant beneficial effect on mental and physical health, and elderly fitness programs are a good and widely accepted approach to prevent frailty. In this chapter, we examine what elderly people actually want and need when it comes to technologies designed to support and encourage their physical fitness. We present the ELF@Home project as a case study, and report design insights and other results from user involvement in the project. User involvement is a key component of the approach and uses methods such as interviews, focus group meetings, early component and prototype tests with users, as well as inputs from medical experts. ELF@Home is a clear example of a "Positive Technology’" approach exemplifying the scientific and applied use of technology for improving the quality of personal experience through its structuring (by using a goal, rules, and a feedback system) and personal augmentation (to achieve multimodal and mixed experiences). The project proposes the adoption of new technology in everyday life from the perspective of positive psychology, approaching this aim by designing devices and systems that are actually usable and desirable in supporting extended healthy living for this target population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey, USA: IGI Global, 2016
Series
Advances in psychology, mental health, and behavioral studies
Keywords
Elderly, Fitness, Physical Exercise, Sensor Technology, Personal Trainer, Successful Aging, User Involvement
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Media and Communications
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap; människa-dator interaktion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109186 (URN)9781466699861 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Riva, G., Mantovani, F., Lindh Waterworth, E. & Waterworth, J. A. (2015). Intention, action, self and other: an evolutionary model of presence. In: Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz (Ed.), Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology (pp. 73-99). New York: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intention, action, self and other: an evolutionary model of presence
2015 (English)In: Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology / [ed] Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz, New York: Springer, 2015, p. 73-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The term "presence" entered in the wide scientific debate in 1992 when Sheridan and Furness used it in the title of a new journal dedicated to the study of virtual reality systems and teleoperations: Presence, Teleoperators and Virtual Environments. Following this approach, the term "presence" has been used to describe a widely re-ported sensation experienced during the use of virtual reality. The main limitation of this vision is what is not said. What is presence for? Is it a specific cognitive process? To answer to these questions, a second group of researchers considers presence as a broad psychological phenomenon, not necessarily linked to the experience of a medium, whose goal is the control of the individual and social activity. In this chapter we support this second vision, starting from the following broad statements: (a) the psychology of presence is related to human action and its organization in the environment; (b) the psychology of presence is related to the body and to the embodiment process; (c) presence is an evolved process related to the understanding and management of the causal texture of both the physical and social worlds. In the following paragraphs we will justify these claims and underline their relevance for the design and usage of interactive technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2015
Keywords
evolutionary psychology, active theory, presence, action, intentionality, self, consciousness
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97706 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10190-3_5 (DOI)978-3-319-10189-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-10190-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, J., Lindh Waterworth, E., Riva, G. & Mantovani, F. (2015). Presence: form, content and consciousness. In: Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz (Ed.), Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology (pp. 35-58). Springer-Verlag New York
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence: form, content and consciousness
2015 (English)In: Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology / [ed] Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 35-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2015
Keywords
Evolution, consciousness, embodiment, self, psychology, psychotherapy, synesthesia, measurement, action, brain, imagination, imagery, form, content, attention, augmented reality, communication & technology, human-computer interaction (HCI), teleprescence, virtual reality
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97705 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-10190-3_3 (DOI)978-3-319-10189-7 (ISBN)978-3-319-10190-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-06 Created: 2015-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, J. & Waterworth, E. (2014). Altered, expanded and distributed embodiment: the three stages of interactive presence (1ed.). In: Riva, G, Waterworth, J. A. & Murray, D. (Ed.), Interacting with Presence: HCI and the Sense of Presence in Computer Mediated Environments (pp. 32-45). Walter de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered, expanded and distributed embodiment: the three stages of interactive presence
2014 (English)In: Interacting with Presence: HCI and the Sense of Presence in Computer Mediated Environments / [ed] Riva, G, Waterworth, J. A. & Murray, D., Walter de Gruyter, 2014, 1, p. 32-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This conceptual chapter outlines three stages in the development of interactive presence, and outlines some possibilities and challenges raised by each, and by their combination. The first stage, presence via altered embodiment, refers to the way technology allows us to experience the world with modified or enhanced senses. The second stage, via expanded embodiment, refers to technology pushing the envelope of the mental body in which one feels present, out beyond the physical body. Finally, distributed embodiment refers to how the sense of being present in the world can be separated from that of ownership of a particular body, through the development of new approaches to deploying the technologies of virtual realization. We suggest that presence is the yardstick of embodiment from an experiential perspective. If you cannot feel presence, you are not embodied in the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2014 Edition: 1
Keywords
Embodiment, Perception, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Non-mediation
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86796 (URN)10.2478/9783110409697.2 (DOI)978-3-11-040969-7 (ISBN)978-3-11-040967-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-11 Created: 2014-03-11 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, J. & Waterworth, E. (2014). Distributed embodiment: real presence in virtual bodies. In: Mark Grimshaw (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of virtuality: (pp. 589-601). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributed embodiment: real presence in virtual bodies
2014 (English)In: The Oxford handbook of virtuality / [ed] Mark Grimshaw, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 589-601Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter discusses the notion of mediated presence, the feeling of being experientially present in a virtual or mixed reality, and describes how this form of virtuality is developing into "distributed embodiment". When we experience strong mediated presence, our experience is that the technology has become part of the self. Distributed embodiment describes how our sense of being present in the world is becoming separated from our sense of ownership of a particular body, through the development of new approaches to deploying the technologies of virtualization that give rise to what is known as "mediated presence", or "telepresence". The possibility for distributed embodiment comes from the physical-virtual nature of familiar, first-person embodiment. We move from a sense of presence in the physical world, though a mediated sense of presence in virtuality, to the mediated sense of being in the physical-virtual world in another body than our own.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014
Keywords
mediated presence, telepresence, virtual reality, mixed reality, distributed embodiment, self
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83122 (URN)10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199826162.013.024 (DOI)978-0-19-982616-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-11-18 Created: 2013-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, E. (2014). Kan tekniken bidra till det goda äldrelivet?. In: : . Paper presented at SWEDAGE 2014. Umeå
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kan tekniken bidra till det goda äldrelivet?
2014 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94032 (URN)
Conference
SWEDAGE 2014
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-10-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Winge, M. & Waterworth, E. (2014). Scenario for a patient at home in health and social care. Journal of Healthcare Leadership (6), 51-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scenario for a patient at home in health and social care
2014 (English)In: Journal of Healthcare Leadership, ISSN 1179-3201, E-ISSN 1179-3201, no 6, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes and discusses the situation for a typical patient with multiple illnesses and how his case would benefit from improved coordination, communication, and collaboration among all involved care providers. The paper is built around a patient case presented in a current scenario. The authors identified that for a single patient with several problems and diagnoses and the involvement of several care actors, the common issues concern lack of collaboration, lack of coordination, and awareness of what others have done to assess, plan, perform, and evaluate care. This presumably leads to a lack of care quality and a lack of effective use of care resources. The scenario and the findings are based on a patient-oriented perspective, on an analysis expressed in focus groups, and on interviews with key actors in health and social care. The paper also discusses the fact that an increasing number of patients are treated in their homes by a variety of organizations, and how this fact raises new and more intense demands on the various stakeholders forming the care staff to collaborate and coordinate care. We point to the need for managers in and between organizations to agree on the ways of collaborating at the operational level. Most importantly, by taking a basic set of issues as the starting point for reasoning, we derived a set of related problems and suggest solutions to deal with these. The literature currently lacks scenario descriptions that put the patient's situation into focus with respect to collaboration between health and social care. Finally, the paper presents a future case for collaboration including support by new e-services.

Keywords
multisectorial collaboration, coordination, communication, patient-centered care, home care, health and social care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Social Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94029 (URN)10.2147/JHL.S68167 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-10-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Waterworth, E. (2014). Varför du som senior har nytta av den digitala tekniken?. In: : . Paper presented at Digidelnätverket. Lycksele bibliotek
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Varför du som senior har nytta av den digitala tekniken?
2014 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lycksele bibliotek: , 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94037 (URN)
Conference
Digidelnätverket
Available from: 2014-10-02 Created: 2014-10-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Peter, C., Kreiner, A., Schröter, M., Kim, H., Beiber, G., Öhberg, F., . . . Ballesteros, S. (2013). AGNES: connecting people in a multimodal way. Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, 7(3), 229-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AGNES: connecting people in a multimodal way
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2013 (English)In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 229-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Western societies are confronted with a number of challenges caused by the increasing number of older citizens. One important aspect is the need and wish of older people to live as long as possible in their own home and maintain an independent life. As people grew older, their social networks disperse, with friends and families moving to other parts of town, other cities or even countries. Additionally, people become less mobile with age, leading to less active participation in societal life. Combined, this normal, age-related development leads to increased loneliness and social isolation of older people, with negative effects on mental and physical health of those people. In the AGNES project, a home-based system has been developed that allows connecting elderly with their families, friends and other significant people over the Internet. As most older people have limited experience with computers and often special requirements on technology, one focus of AGNES was to develop with the users novel technological means for interacting with their social network. The resulting system uses ambient displays, tangible interfaces and wearable devices providing ubiquitous options for interaction with the network, and secondary sensors for additionally generating carefully chosen information on the person to be relayed to significant persons. Evaluations show that the chosen modalities for interaction are well adopted by the users. Further it was found that use of the AGNES system had positive effects on the mental state of the users, compared to the control group without the technology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
Keywords
Ambient assistance, Tangible interaction, Wearable devices, Aging; Wellbeing, Social network
National Category
Engineering and Technology Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-70202 (URN)10.1007/s12193-013-0118-z (DOI)000327382500006 ()
Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, A. & Waterworth, E. (2013). Boken om AGNES: erfarenheter av ett projekt om äldre och IT (1ed.). Umeå: Umeå University Department of Informatics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boken om AGNES: erfarenheter av ett projekt om äldre och IT
2013 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Hur kan vi utveckla informationsteknik som passar äldre? Är sådan teknikspeciell, och i så fall hur och varför? Vad innebär det att vara äldre och delta iett sådant forskningsprojekt? Och när projektet är användardrivet och deäldre betraktas som de allra viktigaste deltagarna, vad innebär egentligendet?Det här är några exempel på de frågor som har lyfts i forskningsprojektetAGNES. Boken visar dels på erfarenheter av att skapa och driva ett projektmed syfte att bedriva användardriven teknikutveckling tillsammans medseniorer och representanter från näringsliv, kommun och universitetet. Delsvisar den på de äldres perspektiv på att ha deltagit i utveckling av nyinformationsteknik.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University Department of Informatics, 2013. p. 39 Edition: 1
Keywords
ageing, ICT, äldre, IT
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71042 (URN)978-91-7459-601-4 (ISBN)978-91-7459-602-1 (ISBN)
Projects
AGNES
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2013-05-16 Created: 2013-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations

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