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Stenling, Andreas
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Tafvelin, S., Stenling, A., Lundmark, R. & Westerberg, K. (2019). Aligning job redesign with leadership training to improve supervisor support: a quasi-experimental study of the integration of HR practices. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 28(1), 74-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aligning job redesign with leadership training to improve supervisor support: a quasi-experimental study of the integration of HR practices
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 74-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this quasi-experimental study, we examine the alignment of a job redesign initiative with leadership training aimed at increasing supervisors' opportunities for providing support to employees. In addition, we examine intervention-mediated effects on climate for innovation through increases in perceived supervisor support. To test the hypothesized process, we used employee ratings (N = 524) of perceived supervisor support and climate for innovation collected at three time points over 2 years in the home help services in seven Swedish municipalities. Results of latent growth curve analyses showed that employees in the intervention group had a stronger and positive slope of perceived supervisor support relative to the comparison group. Further, the growth trajectories of perceived supervisor support were positively associated with climate for innovation at the 24-month follow-up. The study contributes to the human resource management literature by showing that alignment of employment practices such as training with work practices such as job redesign may be a promising strategy for achieving positive outcomes at multiple levels in organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
HR practices, job redesign, leadership training, supervisor support, intervention mediated effects
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156602 (URN)10.1080/1359432X.2018.1541887 (DOI)000456815300005 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-073
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Sánchez-Oliva, D., Kinnafick, F.-E., Smith, N. & Stenling, A. (2018). Assessing perceived need support and need satisfaction in physical education: adaptation and validation with English students. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 22(4), 332-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing perceived need support and need satisfaction in physical education: adaptation and validation with English students
2018 (English)In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 332-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to validate an English version of Basic Psychological Needs Support Questionnaire (BPNSQ) and the Basic Psychological Needs in Physical Education Scale (BPN-PE) in the physical education context. Participants included 453 students aged between 12 and 17 years. For the BPNSQ, the hypothesized three-factor solution displayed high interfactor correlations (rs > 1), and a follow-up analysis indicated that the items were represented by a single need-support factor. For the BPN-PE, hypothesized three-factor solution was supported. Both scales were found invariant across gender, and the nomological validity was also demonstrated through the associations between factors of both scales. This study provides initial support for the use of the BPN-PE to assess psychological need satisfaction within the physical education context among English-speaking adolescents. The hypothesized three-factor structure of the BPNSQ was not supported and more research is needed to evaluate the English version in the physical education context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Validation, psychological need support, psychological need satisfaction, self-determination theory, physical education
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152285 (URN)10.1080/1091367X.2018.1461627 (DOI)000444732900006 ()
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Davis, P. A. & Stenling, A. (2018). Examining associations between affective states and physiological responses before, during, and after competitive cycling time trials. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), 40, S86-S86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining associations between affective states and physiological responses before, during, and after competitive cycling time trials
2018 (English)In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 40, p. S86-S86Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152416 (URN)000444556400296 ()
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Clement, D., Ivarsson, A., Tranaeus, U., Johnson, U. & Stenling, A. (2018). Investigating the influence of intraindividual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 28(4), 1461-1466
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating the influence of intraindividual changes in perceived stress symptoms on injury risk in soccer
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1461-1466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that high levels of stress and stress responsivity can increase the risk of injuries. However, most of the research that has supported this notion has focused on between-person relationships, ignoring the relationships at the within-person level. As a result, the objective of this study was to investigate if within-person changes in perceived stress symptoms over a 1-month time period could predict injury rates during the subsequent 3months. A prospective design with two measurement points (Time 1at the beginning of the season and Time 21month into the season) was utilized. A total of 121 competitive soccer players (85 males and 36 females; M-age=18.39, SD=3.08) from Sweden and the United States completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (KPDS) and a demographic sheet at Time 1. The KPDS was also completed at Time 2, and all acute injuries that occurred during the subsequent 3-month period were recorded. A Bayesian latent change scores model was used to determine whether within-person changes in stress symptoms could predict the risk of injury. Results revealed that there was a credible positive effect of changes in stress symptoms on injury rates, indicating that an increase in reported stress symptoms was related to an increased risk for injury. This finding highlights the importance of creating caring and supportive sporting environments and relationships and teaching stress management techniques, especially during the earlier portion of competitive seasons, to possibly reduce the occurrence of injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
athletes, psychological predictors, sport injury, stress management
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146197 (URN)10.1111/sms.13048 (DOI)000427140700016 ()29283451 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, R., Schwarz, U. v., Hasson, H., Stenling, A. & Tafvelin, S. (2018). Making it fit: Associations of line managers' behaviours with the outcomes of an organizational-level intervention. Stress and Health, 34(1), 163-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making it fit: Associations of line managers' behaviours with the outcomes of an organizational-level intervention
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2018 (English)In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Line managers' behaviours are important during implementation of occupational health interventions. Still, little is known about how these behaviours are related to intervention outcomes. This study explored the relationship between line managers' intervention-specific transformational leadership (IsTL), intervention fit (the match between the intervention, persons involved, and the surrounding environment), and change in intrinsic motivation and vigour. Both direct and indirect relationships between IsTL and change in intrinsic motivation and vigour were tested. Ninety employees participating in an organizational-level occupational health intervention provided questionnaire ratings at baseline and after 6months. The results showed IsTL to be related to intervention fit and intervention fit to be related to intrinsic motivation. Using intervention fit as a mediator, the total effects (direct and indirect combined) of IsTL on change in intrinsic motivation and vigour were significant. In addition, IsTL had a specific indirect effect on intrinsic motivation. This study is the first to use IsTL as a measure line managers' behaviours. It is also the first to empirically evaluate the association between intervention fit and intervention outcomes. By including these measures in evaluations of organizational-level occupational health interventions, we can provide more informative answers as to what can make interventions successful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
intervention fit, intervention process, line managers, occupational health, process evaluation, ansformational leadership
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145151 (URN)10.1002/smi.2770 (DOI)000424664900016 ()28681480 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, H., Carlin, M., Podlog, L., Stenling, A. & Lindwall, M. (2018). Motivational profiles and burnout in elite athletes: A person-centered approach. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 35, 118-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motivational profiles and burnout in elite athletes: A person-centered approach
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2018 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 35, p. 118-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to assess the link between elite athletes' motivational profiles and burnout using a person-centered approach. Participants were 391 Spanish elite athletes (201 males and 190 females), aged 16-30 years who completed questionnaires measuring demographic information, self-determined motivation, and athlete burnout. Latent profile analysis resulted in a five profile solution labeled: amotivation (Class 1), low motivation (Class 2), moderately autonomous motivation (Class 3), amotivated and moderately controlled motivation (Class 4), and highly motivated (Class 5). While no significant differences were found in emotional/physical exhaustion, Class 4 (amotivated and moderately controlled motivation) scored higher than classes 2 (low motivation), 3 (moderately autonomous motivation), and 5 (highly motivated) on a Reduced sense of Accomplishment and Sport Devaluation. Findings are discussed in relation to Self-Determination Theory, suggesting that the quality of one's motivation may be equally, if not more important than the quantity of motivation in determining subsequent health, well-being, and performance outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Burnout, Self-determination, Elite athletes, Latent analysis
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146154 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.11.009 (DOI)000426331600014 ()
Available from: 2018-05-15 Created: 2018-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Li, C., Ivarsson, A., Stenling, A. & Wu, Y. (2018). The dynamic interplay between burnout and sleep among elite blind soccer players. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 37, 164-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The dynamic interplay between burnout and sleep among elite blind soccer players
2018 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 37, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dynamic pattern between burnout and sleep among athletes is unknown. This longitudinal survey examined the interplay between burnout and sleep among blind elite soccer players. China national blind soccer team players (n = 10) completed measures on burnout and sleep quality through interview at baseline (month 1), and followed at months 2, 3, 4, and 5. The results of dynamic p-technique analysis, using Bayesian estimation, showed a credible relationship between burnout and sleep quality. Also, burnout had a credible lagged effect on subsequent sleep quality whereas sleep quality did not have a credible lagged effect on burnout. The results suggest that burnout and sleep are not reciprocally related and burnout may be a risk factor of sleep problems among athletes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Bayesian estimation, Disability sport, p-technique analysis, Sleep quality
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150734 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2017.08.008 (DOI)000438478800019 ()2-s2.0-85028377538 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Quested, E., Ntoumanis, N., Stenling, A., Thogersen-Ntoumani, C. & Hancox, J. E. (2018). The need-relevant instructor behaviors scale: development and initial validation. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), 40(5), 259-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The need-relevant instructor behaviors scale: development and initial validation
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 259-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This article outlines the development and validation of the Need-Relevant Instructor Behaviors Scale (NIBS). Drawing from self-determination theory, the NIBS is the first observation tool designed to code the frequency and the intensity of autonomy-, competence-, and relatedness-relevant behaviors of exercise instructors. The scale also captures the frequency of need-indifferent behaviors.

Methods: The behaviors of 27 exercise instructors were coded by trained raters on two occasions, before and after they received training in adaptive motivational communication.

Results: Findings supported the structural validity and reliability of the scale. The scale's sensitivity to detect changes in frequency and intensity of need-relevant behaviors was also evidenced. Conclusions: The NIBS is a new tool that offers a unique, tripartite assessment of need-relevant behaviors of leaders in the physical activity domain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
Keywords
exercise, motivation, need support, need thwarting, observation, self-determination theory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154082 (URN)10.1123/jsep.2018-0043 (DOI)000450600700004 ()30404573 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Hjelte, J., Stenling, A. & Westerberg, K. (2018). Youth jobs: young peoples' experiences of changes in motivation regarding engagement in occupations in the Swedish public sector. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, 23(1), 36-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Youth jobs: young peoples' experiences of changes in motivation regarding engagement in occupations in the Swedish public sector
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, ISSN 0267-3843, E-ISSN 2164-4527, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 36-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article focuses on the influence of a programme with the purpose of increasing young people’s motivation to engage in professions with labour shortages in the Swedish public sector. The data collection methods used were qualitative and quantitative. The study shows that employment quality (skills, learning opportunities and social interaction) is essential to young people in relation to labour market interventions targeted at professions with labour shortages in the public sector. There appears to be heterogeneity in how young people value different factors. In addition, the motivational profile of young people seems to be an evolving process, but also in what way participation in a programme with focus on professions with labour shortages may contribute to such changes. The results indicate that, when planning a programme aimed at young people, individual differences should be taken into account in order to motivate them to work in professions with labour shortages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
youth jobs, motivation, professions, public sector
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132262 (URN)10.1080/02673843.2016.1269653 (DOI)000431086100004 ()
Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. B. T., Stenling, A., Sjöström, E., Neely, G., Lindner, P., Hassmén, P., . . . Carlbring, P. (2017). Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Affective Disorders, 215, 85-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments.

Method/results: Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges gav treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale.

Limitations: The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed.

Conclusions: The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes.

Keywords
Depression, Physical activity, Behavioral activation, Treatment, RCT, Growth curve modeling
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136322 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.018 (DOI)000401213300012 ()28319696 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FORTE 2011-0477
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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