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Spoerry, Christian
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Spoerry, C. (2017). Streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading enzymes of the IdeS and IgdE family. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading enzymes of the IdeS and IgdE family
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Bacteria of the genus Streptococcus are common asymptomatic colonisers of humans and animals. As opportunistic pathogens they can however, depending on their host’s immune status and other circumstances, cause mild to very severe infections. Streptococci are highly intertwined with specific host species, but can also cause zoonosis or anthroponosis in more uncommon hosts. Prolonged and reoccurring infections require immune evasion strategies to circumvent detection and eradication by the host’s immune defence. A substantial part of the immune defence against bacterial pathogens is mediated by immunoglobulins. This thesis is based on work to identify and characterise immunoglobulin degrading enzymes secreted by different Streptococcus species as a means to sabotage and evade antibody-mediated immune responses.

Stoichiometric and kinetic analysis of the IgG degrading enzyme IdeS from the important human pathogen S. pyogenes revealed that IdeS cleaves IgG, opposed to previous publications, as a monomer following classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

The IdeS homologue of S. suis, IdeSsuis, did however not cleave IgG, but was highly specific fo rporcine IgM. S. suis was found to possess yet another protease, IgdE, capable of cleaving porcine IgG. Both of these proteases were shown to promote increased bacterial survival in porcine blood during certain conditions.

IgdE is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family (C113). Novel streptococcal members of this protease family were shown to specifically degrade certain IgG subtypes of the respective Streptococcus species’ main host. The observed substrate specificity of IgdE family proteases reflects the host tropism of these Streptococcus species, thereby giving insights into host-pathogen co-evolution.

The abundance of immunoglobulin degrading enzymes among Streptococcus species indicates the importance of evasion from the antibody mediated immune responses for streptococci. These novel identified immunoglobulin degrading enzymes of the IdeS and IgdE protease families are potential valid vaccine targets and could also be of biotechnological use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2017. p. 61
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1892
Keywords
Streptococcus, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. suis, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus, S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus, protease, immunoglobulin, immune evasion, IdeS, IgdE
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134552 (URN)9789176016985 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-01, Major Groove, Byggnad 6L, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-05-11 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Spoerry, C., Seele, J., Valentin-Weigand, P., Baums, C. G. & von Pawel-Rammingen, U. (2016). Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG.. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 291(15), 7915-7925
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification and Characterization of IgdE, a Novel IgG-degrading Protease of Streptococcus suis with Unique Specificity for Porcine IgG.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 15, p. 7915-7925Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus suis is a major endemic pathogen of pigs causing meningitis, arthritis, and other diseases. Zoonotic S. suis infections are emerging in humans causing similar pathologies as well as severe conditions such as toxic shock-like syndrome. Recently, we discovered an IdeS family protease of S. suis that exclusively cleaves porcine IgM and represents the first virulence factor described, linking S. suis to pigs as their natural host. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel, unrelated protease of S. suis that exclusively targets porcine IgG. This enzyme, designated IgdE for immunoglobulin G-degrading enzyme of S. suis, is a cysteine protease distinct from previous characterized streptococcal immunoglobulin degrading proteases of the IdeS family and mediates efficient cleavage of the hinge region of porcine IgG with a high degree of specificity. The findings that all S. suis strains investigated possess the IgG proteolytic activity and that piglet serum samples contain specific antibodies against IgdE strongly indicate that the protease is expressed in vivo during infection and represents a novel and putative important bacterial virulence/colonization determinant, and a thus potential therapeutic target.

Keywords
antibody, cysteine protease, immunoglobulin G (IgG), proteolytic enzyme, Streptococcus, substrate specificity
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Other Veterinary Science Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118732 (URN)10.1074/jbc.M115.711440 (DOI)000374056700014 ()26861873 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Spoerry, C., Hessle, P., Lewis, M. J., Paton, L., Woof, J. M. & von Pawel-Rammingen, U. (2016). Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.. PLoS ONE, 11(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129369 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0164809 (DOI)000386202300031 ()27749921 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Seele, J., Singpiel, A., Spoerry, C., von Pawel-Rammingen, U., Valentin-Weigand, P. & Baums, C. G. (2013). Identification of a novel host-specific IgM protease in Streptococcus suis. Paper presented at 65th Annual Meeting of the German-Society-for-Hygiene-and-Microbiology (DGHM) e V / Annual Meeting of the German-Society-for-Infectious-Diseases (DGI) e V, SEP 22-25, 2013, Rostock, GERMANY. International Journal of Medical Microbiology, 303(Suppl. 1, MPP35), 58-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of a novel host-specific IgM protease in Streptococcus suis
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 1438-4221, E-ISSN 1618-0607, Vol. 303, no Suppl. 1, MPP35, p. 58-58Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus (S.) suis is an important invasive, extracellular pathogen in pigs, which causes meningitis, arthritis, serositis and other diseases. Furthermore, it is also an emerging zoonotic agent. This study was initiated by the finding that IgM degradation products are released after opsonization of S. suis with porcine serum. The objective of this work was to identify and characterize the factor responsible for IgM cleavage. The results showed that a protein of S. suis with high homology to the well characterized IgG endopeptidase of S. pyogenes IdeS (or Mac1) [1, 2], designated IdeSsuis, degrades immunoglobulins (Ig) of the isotype M, but not IgG, IgA or other proteins present in porcine cerebrospinal fluid, joint fluid or serum. Western Blot analysis revealed that IdeSsuis is host-specific as it exclusively cleaves porcine IgM but not IgM from six other species. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that this protein modulates binding of IgM to the bacterial surface. Furthermore the isogenic ideSsuis deletion mutant is significantly attenuated in survival in porcine blood [3]. IdeSsuis is the first prokaryotic IgM-specific protease described indicating a novel host-pathogen interaction at an early stage of the host immune response. Furthermore cleavage of porcine IgM by IdeSsuis is the first identified phenotype reflecting functional adaptation of S. suis to pigs as the main host.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87426 (URN)10.1016/j.ijmm.2013.08.004 (DOI)000331497600197 ()
Conference
65th Annual Meeting of the German-Society-for-Hygiene-and-Microbiology (DGHM) e V / Annual Meeting of the German-Society-for-Infectious-Diseases (DGI) e V, SEP 22-25, 2013, Rostock, GERMANY
Available from: 2014-04-02 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Seele, J., Singpiel, A., Spoerry, C., von Pawel-Rammingen, U., Valentin-Weigand, P. & Baums, C. G. (2013). Identification of a Novel Host-Specific IgM Protease in Streptococcus suis. Journal of Bacteriology, 195(5), 930-940
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of a Novel Host-Specific IgM Protease in Streptococcus suis
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 195, no 5, p. 930-940Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is a highly invasive, extracellular pathogen in pigs with the capacity to cause severe infections in humans. This study was initiated by the finding that IgM degradation products are released after opsonization of S. suis. The objective of this work was to identify the bacterial factor responsible for IgM degradation. The results of this study showed that a member of the IdeS family, designated Ide(Ssuis) (Immunoglobulin M-degrading enzyme of S. suis), is responsible and sufficient for IgM cleavage. Recombinant Ide(Ssuis) was found to degrade only IgM but neither IgG nor IgA. Interestingly, Western blot analysis revealed that Ide(Ssuis) is host specific, as it exclusively cleaves porcine IgM but not IgM from six other species, including a closely related member of the Suidae family. As demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy, Ide(Ssuis) modulates binding of IgM to the bacterial surface. Ide(Ssuis) is the first prokaryotic IgM-specific protease described, indicating that this enzyme is involved in a so-far-unknown mechanism of host-pathogen interaction at an early stage of the host immune response. Furthermore, cleavage of porcine IgM by Ide(Ssuis) is the first identified phenotype reflecting functional adaptation of S. suis to pigs as the main host.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: American society of microbiology, 2013
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-70155 (URN)10.1128/JB.01875-12 (DOI)000316961400003 ()
Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Vindebro, R., Spoerry, C. & von Pawel-Rammingen, U. (2013). Rapid IgG heavy chain cleavage by the streptococcal IgG endopeptidase IdeS is mediated by IdeS monomers and is not due to enzyme dimerization. FEBS Letters, 587(12), 1818-1822
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid IgG heavy chain cleavage by the streptococcal IgG endopeptidase IdeS is mediated by IdeS monomers and is not due to enzyme dimerization
2013 (English)In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 587, no 12, p. 1818-1822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus pyogenes employs an IgG specific endopeptidase, IdeS, to counteract the effector functions of specific IgG. The physiological significant step in disarming specific IgG is the cleavage of one IgG heavy chain. So far, characterizations of IdeS enzymatic activity have employed techniques that failed to differentiate between the first and the second cleavage step. The present data demonstrate that IdeS is active as a monomer and that IdeS activity follows classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics arguing against the previously proposed formation of a functional IdeS dimer. Our results show that IdeS inactivates IgG 100-fold faster than previously reported. (C) 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
IgG, Cysteine protease, Monomer/dimer, GAS, Virulence factor, Streptococcus pyogenes
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-78961 (URN)10.1016/j.febslet.2013.04.039 (DOI)000320427400020 ()
Available from: 2013-07-29 Created: 2013-07-29 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Berggren, K., Vindebro, R., Bergström, C., Spoerry, C., Persson, H., Fex, T., . . . Luthman, K. (2012). 3-aminopiperidine-based peptide analogues as the first selective noncovalent inhibitors of the bacterial cysteine protease IdeS. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 55(6), 2549-2560
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3-aminopiperidine-based peptide analogues as the first selective noncovalent inhibitors of the bacterial cysteine protease IdeS
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 2549-2560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A series of eight peptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of the hinge region of IgG and 17 newly synthesized peptide analogues containing a piperidine moiety as a replacement of a glycine residue were tested as potential inhibitors of the bacterial IgG degrading enzyme of Streptococcus pyogenes, IdeS. None of the peptides showed any inhibitory activity of IdeS, but several piperidine-based analogues were identified as inhibitors. Two different analysis methods were used: an SDS-PAGE based assay to detect IgG cleavage products and a surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy based assay to quantify the degree of inhibition. To investigate the selectivity of the inhibitors for IdeS, all compounds were screened against two other related cysteine proteases (SpeB and papain). The selectivity results show that larger analogues that are active inhibitors of IdeS are even more potent as inhibitors of papain, whereas smaller analogues that are active inhibitors of IdeS inhibit neither SpeB nor papain. Two compounds were identified that exhibit high selectivity against IdeS and will be used for further studies.

National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55368 (URN)10.1021/jm201517a (DOI)000301767000004 ()
Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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