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Pálsson, Gísli
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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Júlíusson, Á. D., Lárusdottir, B., Lucas, G. & Pálsson, G. (2019). Episcopal Economics: Property and Power in Post-Reformation Iceland. Scandinavian Journal of History
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Episcopal Economics: Property and Power in Post-Reformation Iceland
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

It has been common to view the Icelandic economy either from the perspective of the individual farm in terms of its productivity or at the national scale in terms of trade and the role of imports/exports. Given the fact that the economy was largely a tenant-based system with a small number of landowners, there is an important middle ground between the household economics of individual farms and the state-sanctioned trade structures that needs to be explored. The objective of this paper is to examine this middle ground and the way the economy was structured in relation to property ownership and tenancy using the case study of the bishopric of Skálholt during the 17th and 18th centuries. Adopting a modified system of provision approach, three scales of analysis are adopted: the settlement itself, the immediate environs and finally the wider regional property network. Tracing the connections outward at successive scales reveals the complex nature of the economic infrastructure behind one of the largest landowners in Iceland at this time.

Keywords
property, power, Iceland
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164759 (URN)10.1080/03468755.2019.1625436 (DOI)000472278600001 ()
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-31
Pálsson, G. (2019). Storied lines: using historical documentation to characterize archaeological connectivity. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storied lines: using historical documentation to characterize archaeological connectivity
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As the title suggests, this thesis applies historical documentation as a connective tissue to link together the main conceptual classes in Iceland’s largest SMR, Ísleif. These are the roughly 6000 historic farmsteads used as a classification scheme in Johnsen’s 1847 land census Jarðatal Johnsens. This thesis has three main components. It is primarily an infrastructural work, and most of the time spent on the thesis went into building the underlying database, made in a way to be accessible to a wide audience and integrated with related research infrastructures already in place and in development. Secondly, it is a methodological work, as the highly detailed inter-site relationships encoded in the infrastructure allowed me to model highly contextual networks, which in turn enabled me to develop new methods for modelling archaeo-historical networks by using the computational ontology CIDOC-CRM. Finally, the historiographical component of the thesis investigates the role of networks of interactions between farmsteads in early 18th century Iceland, and more specifically the role of resource claim networks in land use during the post-Reformation and earlier periods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2019. p. 54
Series
Archaeology and environment, ISSN 0281-5877 ; 32
Keywords
archaeology, iceland, history, 18th century, network analysis, postgis, cidoc-crm, assemblage theory, archaeoinformatics, network
National Category
Archaeology History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164761 (URN)978-91-7855-132-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-11-22, S104, Samhällsvetarhuset, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-11-01 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Palsson, G. (2018). Storied Lines: Network Perspectives on Land Use in Early Modern Iceland. Norwegian Archaeological Review, 51(1-2), 112-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storied Lines: Network Perspectives on Land Use in Early Modern Iceland
2018 (English)In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 51, no 1-2, p. 112-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is a truism nowadays to say that an archaeological site is embedded in extensive networks of relations. Connectivity has played a role in archaeological thinking for a considerable amount of time, and the adoption by archaeologists of both theoretical and methodological frameworks centring connectivity has become widespread. One such example is network analysis, which has seen a significant surge in interest within the field over the past two decades. Archaeological network analysis is far from a mature science, however, and the character of the archaeological record tends to yield networks with richly contextualised nodes connected by ties that, in stark contrast, are often based on very limited evidence for connectivity. Furthermore, archaeological networks are often accompanied by limited discussion about the implications for a connection between two sites interpreted through a commonality in material culture. In particular, the use of historical records to contextualise the interactions between sites remains somewhat uncommon. This paper takes an archaeo-historical network perspective by characterising land-use practices in early modern Iceland by mapping property records describing relations of ownership, resource claims and social obligations alongside comprehensive field archaeological surveys as extensive networks of interdependence between the known farmstead sites occupied at the time. This approach shows that these vibrant networks, documented both spatially and historically, regularly show signs of emergent properties. As these intersite relations begin to exert their own agency, the networks are cut, and the network lines begin to bundle up in knots and entanglements. The study, therefore, does not aim to quantify the presented networks using formal network analysis, but to use the networks as a starting point to investigate the properties that emerge as people aim to enact and materialise networks of property rights, resource claims and exchange.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155254 (URN)10.1080/00293652.2018.1468355 (DOI)000454447800014 ()
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Buckland, P. I., Nyqvist, R., Alexander, B., Palsson, G. & Eriksson, S. (2018). The Swedish Transport Administration’s Toolbox and its Potential in Archaeological and Cultural Heritage Survey: Including a brief review of remote sensing, prospection and geodata analysis methods for archaeology and cultural heritage. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Transport Administration’s Toolbox and its Potential in Archaeological and Cultural Heritage Survey: Including a brief review of remote sensing, prospection and geodata analysis methods for archaeology and cultural heritage
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2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report provides an overview of the main remote sensing methods and geodata types used in archaeological prospection and cultural heritage survey. Based on a literature review, it provides an initial survey of the state of the art nationally and internationally, followed by details on the potential usage of different methods in a Swedish context. The details include pros and cons of methods as well as information on considerations that should be taken into account when applying the methods in different situations. Examples are provided where relevant to explain specific details or illustrate important points. Particular attention has been paid to laser scanning (LiDAR) data due to its increasing prevalence and prominence in landscape and archaeological surveys.

The report continues with a preliminary evaluation of the possibilities for using data provided by Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket), obtained for other stages of the planning process, in archaeological and cultural heritage work. Specifically, the report looks at a number of geodata types obtained from The Geological Survey of Sweden (Sveriges geologiska undersökning/SGU), a nature conservation survey in report form, a ground penetrating radar technical report, terrain laser scanning (LiDAR) and orthophotos (geometrically corrected aerial photographs). The SGU geodata consist of a number of Geographical Information System (GIS) layers describing bedrock and soil types, and the nature conservation survey included accompanying, but incomplete, GIS data. This section consists of concise descriptions of the potential of each group of GIS layers or data, and is complemented by brief, bullet point summaries along with additional technical information in Appendix 1. Comments have been made where additional, related, data sources would be useful. Swedish terms are included in parenthesis where the term differs significantly from the English equivalent.

A final summary provides a compact overview of the main points of the report before providing some conclusions and ideas for further work. This is in turn followed by a list of ideas for enhancing the efficiency with which the types of data discussed can be used in infrastructure projects which have a potential to impact on archaeology/cultural heritage.

References are provided to support important or potentially contentious points or where further reading or research would be advised for a more comprehensive understanding of relevant issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2018. p. 65
Series
Environmental Archaeology Laboratory Reports
Keywords
Remote sensing, cultural heritage, Swedish Transport Administration, archaeology, contract archaeology, consultancy, GIS, geodata
National Category
History and Archaeology Archaeology Remote Sensing Physical Geography Geophysics Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
environmental archaeology; Archaeology; Historical Geology and Paleontology; History; Quarternary Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145563 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Transport Administration
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
Buckland, P. I., Nicolo, D. & Palsson, G. (2018). To tree, or not to tree? On the Empirical Basis for Having Past Landscapes to Experience. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 12(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To tree, or not to tree? On the Empirical Basis for Having Past Landscapes to Experience
2018 (English)In: Digital Humanities Quarterly, ISSN 1938-4122, E-ISSN 1938-4122, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Our intention with this point of view paper is to help refocus an increasingly abstract and theoretically orientated Digital Humanities (DH). We will present a critical perspective on some of the problems and potentials relating to the visualisation of past (primarily non-urban) landscapes, with particular emphasis on the use of empirical evidence, from a combined environmental and archaeological point of view. We will outline some of the major challenges associated with reconstructing past landscapes from data, and give some examples of recent attempts to create platforms for addressing some of these issues. We will also briefly discuss the importance of landscape visualisation in the context of heritage management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO), 2018
Keywords
Landscapes, reconstruction, palaeoecology, visualization, 3D, cultural heritage
National Category
Archaeology Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Archaeology; environmental archaeology; Quarternary Geology; digital humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154912 (URN)
Projects
SEAD
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Aldred, O. & Palsson, G. (2017). Archaeological Imprints: We Follow Lines and Trace Them. Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, 4(2), 163-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological Imprints: We Follow Lines and Trace Them
2017 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Equinox Publishing, 2017
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152151 (URN)000434439100006 ()
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Pálsson, G. (2017). Domination, Subsistence, and Interdependence: Tracing Resource Claim Networks across Iceland's Post-Reformation Landscape. Human Ecology, 47, 619-636
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Domination, Subsistence, and Interdependence: Tracing Resource Claim Networks across Iceland's Post-Reformation Landscape
2017 (English)In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 47, p. 619-636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Landscape archaeology, Historical archaeology, Network analysis, Land use, Resource access, Iceland
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeology; environmental archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163632 (URN)10.1007/s10745-019-00092-w (DOI)000483754800012 ()2-s2.0-85069812976 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-10-30Bibliographically approved
Strawhacker, C., Buckland, P. I., Palsson, G., Fridrikkson, A., Lethbridge, E., Brin, A., . . . Dawson, T. (2015). Building Cyberinfrastructure from the Ground Up for the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization: Introducing the cyberNABO Project. In: Gabriele Guidi, Roberto Scopigno, Juan Carlos Torres, Holger Graf et al. (Ed.), 2015 Digital Heritage: Volume 2: . Paper presented at Digital Heritage International Congress, SEP 28-OCT 02, 2015, Granada, Spain (pp. 457-460). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2, Article ID 7419547.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building Cyberinfrastructure from the Ground Up for the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization: Introducing the cyberNABO Project
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2015 (English)In: 2015 Digital Heritage: Volume 2 / [ed] Gabriele Guidi, Roberto Scopigno, Juan Carlos Torres, Holger Graf et al., Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, Vol. 2, p. 457-460, article id 7419547Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The cyberNABO Project is designed to solidify a developing multidisciplinary community through the development of cyberinfrastructure (CI) to study the long-term human ecodynamics of North Atlantic, a region that is especially vulnerable to ongoing climate and environmental change. It builds build upon prior sustained field and laboratory research, rich and diverse datasets, and a strong involvement by local communities and institutions. cyberNABO is currently hosting a series of workshops aimed at taking these collaborators and stakeholder communities to a new level of integration and to develop capacity for building CI and visualizations in subsequent funding cycles. Research on the long-term sustainability in the Arctic requires compiling data from over thousands of square miles, hundreds of years, and multiple disciplines, from climatology to archaeology to folklore. The complexity of datasets of this scale presents a unique challenge to create a CI system that results in interoperability and accessibility of data – a task that needs an explicit plan and extensive expertise from a variety of fields. Investing in a comprehensive CI system provides the opportunity to integrate collaborators and data from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities, thus providing the opportunity for a holistic approach to long-term human ecodynamics in the context of rapid social and environmental change and for the creation of digital tools for expanded northern community involvement in global change research. In order to address questions of this scale, however, this collaborative group needs to integrate multiple sources, types, and formats of data to address multidisciplinary questions and provide effective support for visualization and modeling efforts that can connect knowledge systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015
Series
Digital Heritage
Keywords
archaeology, data discovery and visualization, long-term human ecodynamics, North Atlantic
National Category
Archaeology Computer and Information Sciences Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Specific Literatures
Research subject
Archaeology; Historical Geology and Paleontology; History; Literature; computer and systems sciences; Quarternary Geology; sustainability; environmental archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118631 (URN)10.1109/DigitalHeritage.2015.7419547 (DOI)000386557900096 ()2-s2.0-84965180555 (Scopus ID)978-1-5090-0048-7 (ISBN)
Conference
Digital Heritage International Congress, SEP 28-OCT 02, 2015, Granada, Spain
Projects
BCC Building Cyberinfrastructure for Transdisciplinary Research and Visualization of the Long-Term Human Ecodynamics of the North AtlanticSEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database
Note

Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), USA

Available from: 2016-03-26 Created: 2016-03-26 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
Palsson, G. Cutting the network, knotting the line.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cutting the network, knotting the line
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164760 (URN)
Available from: 2019-10-30 Created: 2019-10-30 Last updated: 2019-10-31
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