Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Zarin, R. (2017). Faster. Stronger. Better?: designing for enhanced engagement of extreme sports. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faster. Stronger. Better?: designing for enhanced engagement of extreme sports
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The human body is capable of very rich and complex movements and gestures which we use in everyday life to manipulate, navigate and negotiate the world around us—it is our interface for human experience. However, as technology advances it simultaneously shrinks, moving closer to our bodies, intertwining with the many facets of our lives and positions itself between our experiences of the physical environments around us. When utilizing these technological systems in the context of intense sporting activities this competition for our focus leads to problematic scenarios—in the best case altering the aesthetic qualities of physical activity and in the worst case leaving us vulnerable to perilous situations. 

This constructive design research thesis aims to understand how design may be used in relation to the body as part of an informative research approach to generate knowledge about how people actively engage with technology. This is deemed increasingly important as the advancements in technological connectivity and its corresponding trend in miniaturization create a pervasive effect that beckons closer examination and attention as these elements influence how we move. This is achieved by investigations conducted through studies in the area of extreme sports—specifically mountain biking and climbing activities— with the purpose of deepening understanding about human engagement with digital technologies situated within particular contexts. This research explores how the body’s movements can be considered a material to be worked with, designed and assessed in order to influence performance behaviour.

Overall, the thesis undertakes a mixed methods approach to addressing interaction design issues within the context of movement. By advocating making as a generative activity, this research produces a series of artifacts drawing from notions of embodiment that is used to ‘tease out’ knowledge, which is then reflected upon and iterated. These corresponding artifacts embody and imbue designerly intention, subsequently raising pertinent questions of what it means to be connected in an ever evolving digital world, and how we can distinguish, address and begin to design for/with information realities relating to the natural and artificial.

Ultimately the thesis offers three main contributions to designers and researchers: (1) the Stages of Performativity framework that serves to increase awareness of the temporal aspects when designing for activities (2) A proposed model of the makers prototyping process and its corresponding seduction loop phenomenon (3) a series of non-prescriptive artifacts intended to be aspirational such as the Blackbox, Heel hook, Morpheel, Griptile and Climbing Sleeve prototypes. These contributions could be of particular interest to those intent on utilizing a maker driven prototyping practice by primarily proposing a comprehensive account of the transactions occurred during my prototyping process that is conducive to heightening awareness and cognition towards athletes engaged in extreme sports. The hope is to inspire an active role in designing experiences that enhance or support physical activities rather than impeding them.

In addition, this research approach advocates the unpacking or engagement with technological materials as a means for extending understanding and defining their functions in for the sake of employing them for thought provoking, prototyping endeavors to challenge complex and seemingly established systems while simultaneously providing a discourse in regards to the advancements of connected technologies towards a more humanizing experience.  

Finally, it is suggested that the probing of alternate realities by means of constructive design exploration is an essential step towards sketching meaningful engagement when considering the role that we desire technology to play in our lives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2017. p. 291
Series
Umeå Institute of Design Research Publications ; 005
Keywords
constructive design research, design prototypes, prototypes, design research, research through design, embodiment, sports, interaction, technology, user experience, human computer interaction, tactile, feedback
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131924 (URN)978-91-7601-670-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-03-21, Project Studio, Designhögskolan, Östra Strandgatan 30, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , FFL09-0103
Available from: 2017-02-28 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R. (2014). The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Musical Instrument.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Musical Instrument
2014 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

The Voice Harvester is an exploratory interactive installation that embodies human voice in physical materials. Sound input is amplified and transmitted through audio drivers connected to a thin, flexible membrane that agitates the material on it. The title “Voice Harvester” was derived from the fact that the installation create was able to elicit nonlinguistic, expressive, and naturalistic human vocal sounds to explore the full range of capability of the human voice through use of a novel, playful, and embodied interaction.

This design exploration took place by a team at Interactive Institute Umeå under the guidance of Artist and Composer Anders Lind. The concepts of human engagement, involvement, and embodiment as well as the creation of a physical tangible thing were central to this design exploration.

The object elicits curiosity and subsequent interaction utilizing the unusual appearance and leveraging tacit knowledge within users of the purpose of microphones. When a user speaks (or makes any sound) into the microphone they will see the materials in the acrylic tubes animate with the physical embodiment of their voice. The intent was that once this happens users will continue to engage and interact with the Voice Harvester to see the different ways in which they are able to manipulate the materials into action.

The Voice Harvester is built as part of a series of interactive installations to be shown in Umeå, Sweden as part of the Umeå 2014 Capital of Culture and has already been exhibited at the MADE festival 2013.

Co-created with Anders Lind, Music Composer and Rouien Zarin

National Category
Design Music
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118580 (URN)
Projects
Voices of Umeå
Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2021-02-12Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., True, N., Papworth, N., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2013). Be Green: Implementing an Interactive, Cylindrical Display in the Real World. In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays: . Paper presented at PerDis '13, Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, Mountain View, California, June 4-5, 2013 (pp. 55-60). New York, NY: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Be Green: Implementing an Interactive, Cylindrical Display in the Real World
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013, p. 55-60Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many studies in Human-Computer Interaction and related fields, such as pervasive displays, have historically centered around user evaluation and knowledge production, focusing on usability issues and on creating a more efficient user experience. As the trajectory of HCI moves toward the so-called ‘third wave’, new values are being emphasized and explored. These include concepts such as embodiment and engagement, complementing usability as the primary metric of evaluation. This paper explores the ideation, iteration, design, and real-world deployment of such a ‘third wave’ interactive pervasive installation in the form of an interactive, large cylindrical display. The purpose was to display the air quality data in a manner that would inspire elevated environmental consciousness and discussion among Umeå citizens, especially with regard to the environmental impact of different methods of transportation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design-oriented HCI, Public installation, Pervasive display, Cylindrical display
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81667 (URN)10.1145/2491568.2491581 (DOI)978-1-4503-2096-2 (ISBN)
Conference
PerDis '13, Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, Mountain View, California, June 4-5, 2013
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., True, N., Papworth, N., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2013). Be Green: implementing an Interactive,Cylindrical Display in the Real World. In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays (PerDis '13): . Paper presented at PerDis '13, June 04 - 05 2013, Mountain View, California, USA (pp. 55-60). ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Be Green: implementing an Interactive,Cylindrical Display in the Real World
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Symposium on Pervasive Displays (PerDis '13): , ACM Press, 2013, p. 55-60Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many studies in Human-Computer Interaction and related fields,such as pervasive displays, have historically centered around userevaluation and knowledge production, focusing on usability issuesand on creating a more efficient user experience. As the trajectoryof HCI moves toward the so-called ‘third wave’, new values arebeing emphasized and explored. These include concepts such asembodiment and engagement, complementing usability as theprimary metric of evaluation. This paper explores the ideation,iteration, design, and real-world deployment of such a ‘thirdwave’ interactive pervasive installation in the form of aninteractive, large cylindrical display. The purpose was to displaythe air quality data in a manner that would inspire elevatedenvironmental consciousness and discussion among Umeåcitizens, especially with regard to the environmental impact ofdifferent methods of transportation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design-Oriented HCI, Public installation, Pervasive Display, Cylindrical Display
National Category
Interaction Technologies Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110253 (URN)978-1-4503-2096-2 (ISBN)
Conference
PerDis '13, June 04 - 05 2013, Mountain View, California, USA
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
True, N., Papworth, N., Zarin, R., Peeters, J., Nilbrink, F., Lindbergh, K., . . . Lind, A. (2013). The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Installation. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts: . Paper presented at 13th Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Paris, France — April 27 - May 02, 2013 (pp. 3003-3006). New York, NY: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Installation
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013, p. 3003-3006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Voice Harvester is an exploratory interactive installation that embodies human voice in physical materials. Sound input is processed, amplified and transmitted through audio drivers connected to a thin, flexible membrane that agitates the material on it. The title “Voice Harvester” is derived from the original design brief, which called for an object able to elicit non-linguistic, expressive, and naturalistic human vocal sounds to explore the full range of capability of the human voice through use of a novel, playful, and embodied interaction. This paper describes the intention, design process, construction, technical details, interaction, and planned/potential uses of this design exploration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2013
Keywords
Design, Interaction Design, Design Exploration
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81664 (URN)10.1145/2468356.2479595 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034762437 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-1952-2 (ISBN)
Conference
13th Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Paris, France — April 27 - May 02, 2013
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2023-03-24Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2012). Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Sketching in Architecture. In: Proceeding of the 2012 Design Research Society International Conference: . Paper presented at DRS 2012, The 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, (July 1-4, 2012, Bangkok, Thailand).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Sketching in Architecture
2012 (English)In: Proceeding of the 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Widely acknowledged as an archetypal design activity, sketching is typically carried out using little more than pen and paper. Today’s designed artifacts however, are often given qualities that are hard to capture with traditional means of sketching. While pen and paper sketching catches the character of a building, it may not equally well capture how that building changes with the seasons, how people pass through it, how the light moves in between its rooms from sunrise to dawn, and how its façade subtly decays over centuries. Yet, it is often exactly these dynamic and interactive aspects that are emphasized in contemporary design work. So is there a way for designers to be able to sketch also these dynamic processes? Over several years and in different design disciplines, we have been exploring the potential of stop motion animation (SMA) to serve this purpose. SMA is a basic form of animation typically applied to make physical objects appear to be alive. The animator moves objects in small increments between individually photographed frames. When the photographs are combined and played back in continuous sequence, the illusion of movement is created. Although SMA has a long history in filmmaking, the animation technique has received scarce attention in most design fields including product design, architecture, and interaction design. This paper brings SMA into the area of sketching in architecture by reporting on the planning, conduct, result, and evaluation of a workshop course carried out with a group of 50 students at Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Sweden.

Keywords
Sketching; Stop Motion Animation; Design; Architecture; Technique; Workshop; Course
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110269 (URN)
Conference
DRS 2012, The 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, (July 1-4, 2012, Bangkok, Thailand)
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R., Lindbergh, K. & Fällman, D. (2012). Using Stop Motion Animation to Sketch in Architecture: A Practical Approach. Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, 7(3), 78-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Stop Motion Animation to Sketch in Architecture: A Practical Approach
2012 (English)In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Widely acknowledged as an archetypal design activity,sketching is typically carried out using little more than penand paper. Today’s designed artifacts however, are oftengiven qualities that are hard to capture with traditionalmeans of sketching. While pen and paper sketchingcatches the character of a building, it may not equally wellcapture how that building changes with the seasons, howpeople pass through it, how the light moves in betweenits rooms from sunrise to dawn, and how its façade subtlydecays over centuries. Yet, it is often exactly these dynamicand interactive aspects that are emphasised incontemporary design work. So is there a way for designersto be able to sketch also these dynamic processes?Over several years and in different design disciplines, wehave been exploring the potential of stop motionanimation (SMA) to serve this purpose. SMA is a basicform of animation typically applied to make physicalobjects appear to be alive. The animator moves objects insmall increments between individually photographedframes. When the photographs are combined and playedback in continuous sequence, the illusion of movement iscreated. Although SMA has a long history in filmmaking,the animation technique has received scarce attention inmost design fields including product design, architecture,and interaction design. This paper brings SMA into thearea of sketching in architecture by reporting on theplanning, conduct, result, and evaluation of a workshopcourse carried out with a group of 50 students at Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Design and Technology Association, 2012
Keywords
sketching, stop motion animation, design, architecture, Technique, workshop, course
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81663 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R. & Fällman, D. (2011). The Woodbot Pilots: Exploring No-hands Interaction for Interactive Public Installations. In: Norbert Roozenburg, Lin-Lin Chen, Pieter Jan Stappers (Ed.), IASDR 2011: Diversity and unity: Book of abstracts & programme. Paper presented at The 4th World Conference on Design Research, IASDR 2011 (Oct 31-Nov 4, Delft, Netherlands). the International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR) and Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Woodbot Pilots: Exploring No-hands Interaction for Interactive Public Installations
2011 (English)In: IASDR 2011: Diversity and unity: Book of abstracts & programme / [ed] Norbert Roozenburg, Lin-Lin Chen, Pieter Jan Stappers, the International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR) and Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present and discuss the Woodbot Pilots, an interactive experience in the form of a gesture-based game that runs on a large-scale interactive installation designed to be placed in an airport terminal and used by the general public. The background of the project is described, as well as the installation itself and a scenario of its use. To end the paper, we discuss some of the issues it raises in relation to public installations as well as some of the lessons we have learnt in conceiving, designing, implementing, and studying its use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
the International Association of Societies of Design Research (IASDR) and Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, 2011
Keywords
Installation, gestures, 3D camera
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81660 (URN)978-94-6190-719-6 (ISBN)
Conference
The 4th World Conference on Design Research, IASDR 2011 (Oct 31-Nov 4, Delft, Netherlands)
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R. & Fällman, D. (2011). The woodbot pilots: exploring no-handsinteraction for interactive public installations. In: N.F.M. Roozenburg, L.L. Chen & P.J. stappers (Ed.), Diversity and unity: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research. Paper presented at IASDR2011 Delft, Netherlands, October 31-November 4, 2011. IASDR
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The woodbot pilots: exploring no-handsinteraction for interactive public installations
2011 (English)In: Diversity and unity: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research / [ed] N.F.M. Roozenburg, L.L. Chen & P.J. stappers, IASDR , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We present and discuss the Woodbot Pilots, an interactive experience in the form of a gesture-based game that runs on a large-scale interactive installation designed to be placed in an airport terminal and used by the general public. The background of the project is described, as well as the installation itself and a scenario of its use. To end the paper, we discuss some of the issues it raises in relation to public installations as well as some of the lessons we have learnt in conceiving, designing, implementing, and studying its use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IASDR, 2011
Keywords
Installation, gestures, 3D camera
National Category
Design Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110267 (URN)
Conference
IASDR2011 Delft, Netherlands, October 31-November 4, 2011
Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Zarin, R. & Fällman, D. (2011). Through the Troll Forest: Exploring Tabletop Interaction Design for Children with Special Cognitive Needs. In: Proceeding ACM CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 3319-3322). New York: ACM Digital Library
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Through the Troll Forest: Exploring Tabletop Interaction Design for Children with Special Cognitive Needs
2011 (English)In: Proceeding ACM CHI '11 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2011, p. 3319-3322Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We describe the interaction design process of conceiving, designing, implementing, and testing Trollskogen, a purpose-built tabletop multitouch system featuring a range of small software applications, termed 'micro applications'. Each micro application is devised as a tool intended to improve or allow for exercise of social communication skills. Throughout the project, we have worked closely with a group of six children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Down's syndrome, all in the age range of 5-8. The system has been designed together with the users, their teachers, and various experts as a complement to the current curricula. In this paper, the three main phases of our design process are described and we conclude the paper by reporting on and discussing some preliminary findings and observations from a small user study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Digital Library, 2011
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81658 (URN)10.1145/1978942.1979434 (DOI)
Conference
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Available from: 2013-10-20 Created: 2013-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1591-7175

Search in DiVA

Show all publications