umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 71) Show all publications
Edvinsson, S. & Broström, G. (2017). Life course and long-term perspectives of social inequality in mortality among elderly and adults in Northern Sweden 1801–2013. In: : . Paper presented at IUSSP XXVIII, 2017 International Population Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 29 October – 4 November 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life course and long-term perspectives of social inequality in mortality among elderly and adults in Northern Sweden 1801–2013
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We investigate the development of social inequality in Swedish mortality over the life course in the elderly and adult population during the mortality transition. The study focuses on two main questions, the first relate to the long-term change in social differences in mortality. The second question is whether socio-economic position have less impact on the elderly population compared to population in working age and if the age pattern of social inequalities has changed from the 19th century to the present. Furthermore, in this study we consider possible gender-specific patterns in this process. The development of mortality in different social classes is analysed according to both total mortality and major cause-of-death categories. For the later periods, we also compare the results from the class-based analysis with other measures of social position, in this case income and education. Focus is on mortality in the Skellefteå and Umeå regions in northern Sweden 1851-2013. The study is based on the historical population data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University and modern population register data from Statistics Sweden.

Keywords
Adult mortality, old age mortality, social inequality, northern Sweden
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Population studies; Historical Demography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141173 (URN)
Conference
IUSSP XXVIII, 2017 International Population Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, 29 October – 4 November 2017
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2008-6592Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-892
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2018-09-03Bibliographically approved
Westberg, A., Engberg, E. & Edvinsson, S. (2016). A Unique Source for Innovative Longitudinal Research: the POPLINK Database. Historical Life Course Studies, 3, 20-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Unique Source for Innovative Longitudinal Research: the POPLINK Database
2016 (English)In: Historical Life Course Studies, ISSN 1570-1522, E-ISSN 2352-6343, ISSN e-ISSN: 2352-6343, Vol. 3, p. 20-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the longitudinal database POPLINK, which has been developed at the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, Sweden. Based on digitized Swedish population registers between c. 1700-1950, the database contains micro-data that covers the agrarian society through industrialization and further on to the Swedish welfare state and contemporary society. It is now possible to study the profound processes of the second demographic transition using individual level data with a proper size population. POPLINK allows for a large array of longitudinal studies, such as social mobility, migration, fertility, mortality, civil status, kinship relations, diseases, disability and causes of death. International standards of occupations (HISCO) and diseases (ICD-10) have been applied, facilitating comparability. POPLINK covers two large regions in Northern Sweden and is built on complete registrations. It is one of the world’s most information-dense historical population databases, covering up to 15 generations and 350,000 individuals described by 300 variables, allowing the ability to monitor populations over time. POPLINK has been built to allow linkage to modern registries, clinical data and medical biobanks, which enables the study of transgenerational effects, heredity and genetic transfers in disease incidence of the population today. DDB serves as an infrastructure for research and is open to researchers of any nationality. 

Keywords
Longitudinal research, Micro-data, Sweden, Historical population database
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118448 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Junkka, J. & Edvinsson, S. (2016). Gender and fertility within the free churches in the Sundsvall region, Sweden, 1860–1921. The History of the Family, 21(2), 243-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and fertility within the free churches in the Sundsvall region, Sweden, 1860–1921
2016 (English)In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 243-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of secularization in the European fertility decline has been of interest to demographers, who often explore the relationship on a macro-level or by identifying religious affiliation by proxy. However, the relationship has not been thoroughly studied on an individual level utilizing indicators of personal religious conviction and affiliation. The aim of the present article is to examine reproductive practices by religious affiliation in order to understand the impact of secularization on fertility decline. This is accomplished using event history analysis of longitudinal parish register data from Sundsvall (1860–1921) where religious affiliation is identified on a family level. Reproductive practices are analysed using cohort TFR, descriptive statistics and Cox proportional hazard regressions. Free-church affiliates had, overall, a higher probability of having another child than did affiliates to the state church. However, these differences decreased over time, and as fertility dropped throughout society free-church affiliates showed the strongest significant reduction in probability of another birth. This indicates that over time, within the free churches, ideas about respectability and restraint came to mean that birth control, in the form of abstinence within marriage, became an important practice in the formation of gendered religious identities - leading to a relatively early decrease in fertility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
fertility decline, religion, gender, secularization, fertilitetsnedgång, religion, genus, sekularisering
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105082 (URN)10.1080/1081602X.2015.1043929 (DOI)000377774100006 ()
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Åström, D. O., Edvinsson, S., Hondula, D., Rocklöv, J. & Schumann, B. (2016). On the association between weather variability and total and cause-specific mortality before and during industrialization in Sweden. Demographic Research, 35, 991-1009
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the association between weather variability and total and cause-specific mortality before and during industrialization in Sweden
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 35, p. 991-1009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: While there is ample evidence for health risks associated with heat and other extreme weather events today, little is known about the impact of weather patterns on population health in preindustrial societies.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of weather patterns on population health in Sweden before and during industrialization.

METHODS: We obtained records of monthly mortality and of monthly mean temperatures and precipitation for Skelleftea parish, northern Sweden, for the period 1800-1950. The associations between monthly total mortality, as well as monthly mortality due to infectious and cardiovascular diseases, and monthly mean temperature and cumulative precipitation were modelled using a time series approach for three separate periods, 1800-1859, 1860-1909, and 1910-1950.

RESULTS: We found higher temperatures and higher amounts of precipitation to be associated with lower mortality both in the medium term (same month and two-months lag) and in the long run (lag of six months up to a year). Similar patterns were found for mortality due to infectious and cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, the effect of temperature and precipitation decreased over time.

CONCLUSIONS: Higher temperature and precipitation amounts were associated with reduced death counts with a lag of up to 12 months. The decreased effect over time may be due to improvements in nutritional status, decreased infant deaths, and other changes in society that occurred in the course of the demographic and epidemiological transition.

CONTRIBUTION: The study contributes to a better understanding of the complex relationship between weather and mortality and, in particular, historical weather-related mortality.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127048 (URN)10.4054/DemRes.2016.35.33 (DOI)000384716400001 ()
Available from: 2016-10-27 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. & Arvidsson, A. (2016). Sweden: demography and ethnology in the north. In: Mats-Olov Olsson, Fredrick Backman, Alexey Golubev, Björn Norlin, Lars Ohlsson (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Barents region: vol. 2, N-Y (pp. 351-356). Oslo: Pax Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden: demography and ethnology in the north
2016 (English)In: Encyclopedia of the Barents region: vol. 2, N-Y / [ed] Mats-Olov Olsson, Fredrick Backman, Alexey Golubev, Björn Norlin, Lars Ohlsson, Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016, p. 351-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oslo: Pax Forlag, 2016
National Category
Ethnology
Research subject
Ethnology; Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-128026 (URN)9788253038575 (ISBN)9788253038599 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, S. (2015). Hälsoreformer, livsmedelskontroll och hälsoutveckling i svenska städer 1850-1930 (1ed.). In: Per Eriksson (Ed.), Mot ett modernt livsmedelssystem: Livsmedelshygien och livsmedelskontroll i Sverige och Norden 1850-1930 (pp. 65-81). Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hälsoreformer, livsmedelskontroll och hälsoutveckling i svenska städer 1850-1930
2015 (Swedish)In: Mot ett modernt livsmedelssystem: Livsmedelshygien och livsmedelskontroll i Sverige och Norden 1850-1930 / [ed] Per Eriksson, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien, 2015, 1, p. 65-81Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien, 2015 Edition: 1
Series
Skogs- och lantbrukshistoriska meddelanden, ISSN 1402-0386 ; 66
Keywords
Hälsa, livsmedelskontroll, sanitära reformer, Svenska städer
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112306 (URN)978-91-86573-58-4 (ISBN)
Note

Boken utgör Supplement till Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 1402-0386

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rocklöv, J., Edvinsson, S., Arnqvist, P., Sjöstedt de Luna, S. & Schumann, B. (2014). Association of seasonal climate variability and age-specific mortality in northern Sweden before the onset of industrialization. Paper presented at ISEE, ISES and ISIAQ Conference 2013. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(7), 6940-6954
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of seasonal climate variability and age-specific mortality in northern Sweden before the onset of industrialization
Show others...
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 6940-6954Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Little is known about health impacts of climate in pre-industrial societies. We used historical data to investigate the association of temperature and precipitation with total and age-specific mortality in Skellefteå, northern Sweden, between 1749 and 1859.

METHODS: We retrieved digitized aggregated population data of the Skellefteå parish, and monthly temperature and precipitation measures. A generalized linear model was established for year to year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal average temperature and cumulative precipitation using a negative binomial function, accounting for long-term trends in population size. The final full model included temperature and precipitation of all four seasons simultaneously. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for total, sex- and age-specific mortality.

RESULTS: In the full model, only autumn precipitation proved statistically significant (RR 1.02; CI 1.00-1.03, per 1cm increase of autumn precipitation), while winter temperature (RR 0.98; CI 0.95-1.00, per 1 °C increase in temperature) and spring precipitation (RR 0.98; CI 0.97-1.00 per 1 cm increase in precipitation) approached significance. Similar effects were observed for men and women. The impact of climate variability on mortality was strongest in children aged 3-9, and partly also in older children. Infants, on the other hand, appeared to be less affected by unfavourable climate conditions.

CONCLUSIONS: In this pre-industrial rural region in northern Sweden, higher levels of rain during the autumn increased the annual number of deaths. Harvest quality might be one critical factor in the causal pathway, affecting nutritional status and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Autumn rain probably also contributed to the spread of air-borne diseases in crowded living conditions. Children beyond infancy appeared most vulnerable to climate impacts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel, Switzerland: MDPI AG, 2014
Keywords
climate variability, seasonal climate variability, mortality, age-specific mortality, pre-industrial societies, Sweden
National Category
Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91936 (URN)10.3390/ijerph110706940 (DOI)000339989500022 ()25003551 (PubMedID)
Conference
ISEE, ISES and ISIAQ Conference 2013
Note

This article belongs to the Special Issue Environment and Health - Bridging South, North, East and West: Proceedings from the ISEE, ISES and ISIAQ Conference 2013

Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bygren, L. O., Tinghög, P., Carstensen, J., Edvinsson, S., Kaati, G., Pembrey, M. E. & Sjöström, M. (2014). Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren. BMC Genetics, 15, 12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren
Show others...
2014 (English)In: BMC Genetics, ISSN 1471-2156, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 15, p. 12-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This study investigated whether large fluctuations in food availability during grandparents' early development influenced grandchildren's cardiovascular mortality. We reported earlier that changes in availability of food - from good to poor or from poor to good - during intrauterine development was followed by a double risk of sudden death as an adult, and that mortality rate can be associated with ancestors' childhood availability of food. We have now studied transgenerational responses (TGR) to sharp differences of harvest between two consecutive years' for ancestors of 317 people in Overkalix, Sweden. Results: The confidence intervals were very wide but we found a striking TGR. There was no response in cardiovascular mortality in the grandchild from sharp changes of early exposure, experienced by three of the four grandparents (maternal grandparents and paternal grandfathers). If, however, the paternal grandmother up to puberty lived through a sharp change in food supply from one year to next, her sons' daughters had an excess risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.05-6.92). Selection or learning and imitation are unlikely explanations. X-linked epigenetic inheritance via spermatozoa seemed to be plausible, with the transmission, limited to being through the father, possibly explained by the sex differences in meiosis. Conclusion: The shock of change in food availability seems to give specific transgenerational responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Epidemiology, Food change, Environmental shock, Human transgenerational response, Cardiovascular mortality, Overkalix
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88969 (URN)10.1186/1471-2156-15-12 (DOI)000334611200001 ()
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wisselgren, M. J., Edvinsson, S., Berggren, M. & Larsson, M. (2014). Testing Methods of Record Linkage on Swedish Censuses. Historical Methods, 47(3), 138-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing Methods of Record Linkage on Swedish Censuses
2014 (English)In: Historical Methods, ISSN 0161-5440, E-ISSN 1940-1906, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 138-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research benefits a great deal when different kinds of registers can be combined. Record linkage is an important tool for connecting sources to create longitudinal databases of individual data. In this article, researchers test and evaluate different methods of record linkage used when linking two censuses. By comparing the results of the census linkage with other continuous Swedish parish registers, they find that applying constructed name variables and household links considerably increases the success rate without the risk of introducing bias. Missing links are mainly related to name problems, and appear most frequently among children and when the family structure has changed between the censuses. Faulty links are very few and must be regarded as only a marginal problem for analysis. The study underlines the importance of adapting the linkage process to the special characteristics of the sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014
Keywords
censuses, historical demography, historical population databases, name standardization, record linkage, folkräkningar, historisk demografi, historiska befolkningsdatabaser, namnstandardisering, länka historiska data
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92819 (URN)10.1080/01615440.2014.913967 (DOI)000340192000003 ()
Available from: 2014-09-04 Created: 2014-09-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Broström, G. & Edvinsson, S. (2013). A parametric model for old age mortality in mediation analysis. In: : . Paper presented at The XXVII International Population Conference, Busan, Korea, August 26-31, 2013. International Union for the Scientific Study of Population
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A parametric model for old age mortality in mediation analysis
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109971 (URN)
Conference
The XXVII International Population Conference, Busan, Korea, August 26-31, 2013
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2008-6592
Note

This paper is addressing the modelling of old age mortality and its dependence of factors earlier in life. We argue for alternatives to the widely used proportional hazards (PH) model, especially Cox regression. There are several reasons for this. First, it is well known that old age mortality very often is well described by the Gompertz distribution. Second, accelerated failure time (AFT) models can be expressed as linear models, which is important when interest lies in the analysis of mediating effects in the analysis of the impact of early-life factors on old-age mortality. Third, the results of an AFT model fit is easier and more intuitive to interpret in tems of years lost or gained, compared to the PH model fit which reports relative risks. Fourth, contrary to "common knowledge", the family of Gompertz distributions is both a collection of PH families and a collection of AFT families, which we demonstrate in the paper. For instance, Kleinbaum and Klein (2005), in their text book on survival analysis, writes: "The Gompertz model is a parametric PH model but not an AFT model". This mistake is reiterated by other authors.

Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7439-002x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications