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Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Nordin, G. (2016). Familjelivet. In: Per Axelsson, Elisabeth Engberg, Patrik Lantto & Maria J. Wisselgren (Ed.), Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi (pp. 117-126). Sveriges släktforskarförbund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Familjelivet
2016 (Swedish)In: Samiska rötter: släktforska i svenska Sápmi / [ed] Per Axelsson, Elisabeth Engberg, Patrik Lantto & Maria J. Wisselgren, Sveriges släktforskarförbund , 2016, p. 117-126Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sveriges släktforskarförbund, 2016
Series
Sveriges släktforskarförbunds handböcker ; 12
Keywords
Släktforskning, Sápmi
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140197 (URN)9789188341037 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G. & Sköld, P. (2016). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden. Energy Research & Social Science, 16, 13-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 16, p. 13-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research has identified a series of human geography impacts of natural resource developments in sparsely populated areas like the Arctic. These impacts can be mapped to the 'resource cycle', and arise from periods of population growth and decline, changing patterns of human migration and mobility, changing patterns of settlement, and changes in the demographic 'balance' between males and females, young and old, Indigenous and non-Indigenous. This paper examines the applicability of the resource cycle model in the case of hydro energy development in the Jokkmokk municipality of Sweden. Using quantitative demographic data, media reports, and contemporary accounts of hydro development, the paper describes the human geography of Jokkmokk since the late 19th century. The paper concludes that changes in human geography in Jokkmokk mirror what has been observed in regions dependent on non-renewable resources, although it is difficult to distinguish many impacts from those that might have occurred under alternative development scenarios. The paper identifies a 'settlement cycle' with phases of integrated and separated habitation for populations specifically associated with the development. Settlement dynamics, and the impacts of hydro on Sami geography are areas for further research.

Keywords
hydropower, resource cycle, staples thesis, human geography, Arctic
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118369 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2016.03.003 (DOI)000379436100003 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
Mistra Arctic Sustainable Development (www.mistraarctic.se)
Note

Ett corrigendum har publicerats för den här artikeln: / A corrigendum for this article has been published:

Carson, D. B., Carson, D. A., Nordin, G., & Skold, P. (2017). Lessons from the Arctic past: The resource cycle, hydro energy development, and the human geography of Jokkmokk, Sweden (vol 16, pg 13, 2016). Energy Research & Social Science, 28, 109-109. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.05.021

Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Sköld, P. & Nordin, G. (2015). Metodologiska utmaningar vid studier av urfolk i en nordisk kontext. In: Paul Pedersen & Torill Nyseth (Ed.), City-Saami: Same i byen eller bysame? Skandinaviske byer i et samisk perspektiv (pp. 31-57). Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metodologiska utmaningar vid studier av urfolk i en nordisk kontext
2015 (Swedish)In: City-Saami: Same i byen eller bysame? Skandinaviske byer i et samisk perspektiv / [ed] Paul Pedersen & Torill Nyseth, Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas , 2015, p. 31-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kárášjohka: ČálliidLágádusas, 2015
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117008 (URN)978-82-8263-181-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Allard, C., Axelsson, P., Brännlund, I., Cocq, C., Hjortfors, L.-M., Jacobsson, L., . . . Össbo, Å. (2015). Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby. Dagens Nyheter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby
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2015 (Swedish)In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Statens hantering av forskningsresultat i rättsprocessen med Girjas sameby utgör ett hot mot Sverige som rättsstat och kunskapsnation. Åratal av svensk och internationell forskning underkänns och man använder ett språkbruk som skulle kunna vara hämtat från rasbiologins tid. Nu måste staten ta sitt ansvar och börja agera som en demokratisk rättsstat, skriver 59 forskare.

Keywords
girjas, samer, rasbiologi, urfolk, diskriminering
National Category
History Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111276 (URN)
Note

Publicerad: 2015-06-11

Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-11 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. & Sköld, P. (2014). The complex fertility of indigenous Sami and non-reindeer-herding settlers in Jokkmokk 1815–1895. Polar Geography, 37(2), 157-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The complex fertility of indigenous Sami and non-reindeer-herding settlers in Jokkmokk 1815–1895
2014 (English)In: Polar Geography, ISSN 1088-937X, E-ISSN 1939-0513, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 157-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though contemporary fertility shows a steady decrease among indigenous populations in the circumpolar area during the twentieth century, they display a far higher fertility compared to the rest of the population's respective countries. In the absence of Swedish modern data on ethnicity, this study concentrates on fertility in historical times to improve our knowledge on Sami fecundity. Using digitized parish records we aim to study nineteenth century fertility among the Sami and non-Sami in an ethnically mixed parish in the Northern Sweden. The sources also enable an intra-ethnic perspective; thus, the study includes comparisons between forest and mountain Sami. The data revealed a Sami fertility deviating not only from their non-Sami neighbors, but also to a Swedish average. Both Sami and non-Sami women had very low birth rates among young women; nevertheless, Sami women gave birth to fewer children than the non-Sami. Toward the end of the nineteenth century non-Sami women showed crude birth rates well above both Sami and a Swedish average. The fertility pattern among the forest and the mountain Sami revealed both social and economic differences within the Sami group.

National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117007 (URN)10.1080/1088937X.2013.763865 (DOI)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. & Sköld, P. (2012). True or false?: Nineteenth-century Sápmi fertility in qualitative vs. demographic sources. The History of the Family, 17(2), 157-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>True or false?: Nineteenth-century Sápmi fertility in qualitative vs. demographic sources
2012 (English)In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 157-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is limited knowledge about childbirth and childcare among Arctic indigenous peoples in historical times, and the Swedish Sami are no exception. The main aim of the present study is to investigate whether the Sami experienced fertility trends parallel to those of the rest of the population in the area and in Sweden as a whole. Digitized parish records offer a unique possibility to include comparisons from ethnic, cultural, geographical and long-term perspectives. The present study compares the statements about fertility and childcare provided by qualitative sources with data from quantitative demographic investigations. This comparison reveals a contrasting picture, from which it is evident that contemporary observers' impressions of the Sami and their childbirths were somewhat inaccurate. Opposite to what the qualitative sources claimed Sami fertility was higher than the national average rates. Moreover, crude birth rates were high and the average number of children in families exceeded what was generally claimed. We can conclude that the statements made by clergy, physicians and travelers concerning childbirth among the Sami did not correspond particularly well with the demographic reality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2012
Keywords
fertility, family, indigenous population, demography, infant mortality, Sweden
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61239 (URN)10.1080/1081602X.2012.687831 (DOI)000309285100004 ()2-s2.0-84874308554 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-11-07 Created: 2012-11-07 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. (2010). A New Net-based Masters Programme at Umeå University: Indigenous Studies. In: : . Paper presented at “From Cultural Capital to Culture Capital: Understanding the impact of changes to our cultural climate”, University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus, October 4-5, 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Net-based Masters Programme at Umeå University: Indigenous Studies
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47992 (URN)
Conference
“From Cultural Capital to Culture Capital: Understanding the impact of changes to our cultural climate”, University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus, October 4-5, 2010
Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. (2010). Adopting or Rejecting a New Culture?. In: : . Paper presented at 35th Annual Social Science History Association (SSHA) meeting Chicago, 18-21 November 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adopting or Rejecting a New Culture?
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47993 (URN)
Conference
35th Annual Social Science History Association (SSHA) meeting Chicago, 18-21 November 2010
Note

Paper-presentation, session: Indigenous Demography

Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. (2010). Adopting or Rejecting a New Culture?: Marriage patterns among settled Sami under impact of the colonization process in 19th Century Northern Sweden.. In: : . Paper presented at 21st International Congress of Historical Sciences (ICHS), Amsterdam August 22-28 2010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adopting or Rejecting a New Culture?: Marriage patterns among settled Sami under impact of the colonization process in 19th Century Northern Sweden.
2010 (English)In: , 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The predominant inhabitants in the northern Sweden were until the beginning of 19th century the Sami people, indigenous and often nomadic reindeer breeders. As the colonization process of the northern part of the country progressed, it led to increasing contacts between Sami people and Swedes. To some extent there were also Sami people who settled down, chiefly from the forest Sami group, but the majority of the settlers where newcomers. Although previous historical research has focused on the nomadic Sami people, those settled have so far attracted less attention about their demographic behaviour. Knowing their marriage pattern helps illuminate what happens when people from different cultures meet; did the cultural and social grounds shift? And further, did the marriage behaviour among Sami people change when they settled down? Did the Sami people who settled down adopt Swedish cultural grounds or were they more inclined to follow their old traditions and marry within their own group? The main purpose of this paper is thus to explore whether a settled life affected the way Sami people chose to make decisions of decisive importance, in this paper represented by the way people chose whom and when to marry? To meet the aim of this analysis world unique parish registers stored at the Demographic Data Base (DDB), Umeå University are utilized. 

National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47989 (URN)
Conference
21st International Congress of Historical Sciences (ICHS), Amsterdam August 22-28 2010
Note

Session: Inheritance Systems in Comparative Perspective III

Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordin, G. (2009). Äktenskap i Sápmi: Giftermålsmönster och etnisk komplexitet i kolonisationens tidevarv, 1722-1895. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Äktenskap i Sápmi: Giftermålsmönster och etnisk komplexitet i kolonisationens tidevarv, 1722-1895
2009 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Alternative title[en]
Sápmi marriages : Marriage Patterns and Ethnic Complexity During the Era of Colonisation
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores a period in Northern Sweden when contacts between Sami and non-Sami became more frequent as the colonisation progressed. The investigated period is 1722-1895 and eight parishes in northern Sweden are under study. Both the northern as well as the southern Sami area are represented. The main purpose of the thesis is thus to see whether the cultural meeting between Sami and non-Sami affected the way people chose to make significant decisions. In this study these cultural meetings are represented by the way people married.

     To understand the consequences of cultural contacts, where individuals from different backgrounds meet, concepts developed within the field of acculturation theories are used. The marriage patterns among the inhabitants are viewed with regard to three key variables founded by Ruth Dixon, as these help to explain changes or continuations in the individuals’ marital behaviour.

     The southern Sami area seamed to be rather unaffected by the colonisation process, at least according to the marriage pattern. The analysis revealed limited economic openings for marriage as well as cemented marriage traditions, and these prevailed throughout the investigated period. During the 18th and 19th centuries it was evident that the northern Sami areas were significantly affected by the in-migrated newcomers.  Even though the gender distribution in each parish seemed to matter, analysing the overall marriage pattern illuminated chiefly economic reasons for changes that occurred during the colonisation process. As the in-migration of non-Sami progressed, the age at first marriage increased particularly among Sami women. Furthermore, the results indicates that even though settled Sami probably interacted with non-Sami on a daily basis, and were integrated in their lifestyle, Sami settlers continuously estranged themselves from a complete assimilation and stuck to their Sami culture and traditions. Thus, language and cultural expressions seemed to have mattered when it came to marriage. 

     The thesis concludes that according to the marriage pattern, economic prerequisites for preferentially the Sami, changed dramatically through the colonisation process. Most affected by the changes were thus the Sami women, who experienced an unfavourable marriage market as the colonisation progressed. Towards the end of the nineteenth century the preferable form of coexistence was still the legal marriage in the area, and the marriage as an institution was of considerable importance, which is also evident since the marriage to some extent still seemed to be a family affair. The study also showed that Sami people in the southern Sami area interacted with non-Sami to a less degree than was the case in the north. However, in the north, the more ethnic complex parishes revealed an integrating population, rather than assimilating. The more ethnically homogenous parishes instead pointed towards an assimilated state among the newcomers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2009. p. 193
Series
Report from the Demographic Data Base, ISSN 0349-5132 ; 31Skrifter från Centrum för samisk forskning, ISSN 1651-5455 ; 12
Keywords
äktenskap, giftermålsmönster, nuptialitet, Sápmi, norrland, kolonisation, samer, etnicitet, ackulturation, 1700-tal, 1800-tal, Sverige, Karesuando, Jukkasjärvi, Jokkmokk, Gällivare, lappförsamlingar
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22093 (URN)978-91-7264-757-2 (ISBN)
Distributor:
Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, 901 87, Umeå
Public defence
2009-05-20, Hörsal E, Humanisthuset, 901 87 Umeå universitet, Umeå, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-04-29 Created: 2009-04-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6789-8511

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