umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Wang, J., Ding, J., Tan, B., Robinson, K. M., Michelson, I. H., Johansson, A., . . . Ingvarsson, P. K. (2018). A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant. Genome Biology, 19, Article ID 72.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 19, article id 72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The initiation of growth cessation and dormancy represent critical life history trade offs between survival and growth and have important fitness effects in perennial plants Such adaptive life history traits often show strong local adaptation along environmental gradients but, despite then importance, the genetic architecture of these traits remains poorly understood.

Results: We integrate whole genome re sequencing with environmental and phenotypic data from common garden experiments to investigate the genomic basis of local adaptation across a latitudinal gradient in European aspen (Populus tremula). A single genomic region containing the PtFT2 gene mediates local adaptation in the timing of bud set and explains 65% of the observed genetic variation in bud set This locus is the likely target of a recent selective sweep that originated right before or during colonization of northern Scandinavia following the last glaciation Field and greenhouse experiments confirm that variation in PtFT2 gene expression affects the phenotypic variation in bud set that we observe in wild natural populations.

Conclusions: Our results reveal a major effect locus that determines the timing of bud set and that has facilitated rapid adaptation to shorter growing seasons and colder climates in European aspen. The discovery of a single locus explaining a substantial fraction of the variation in a key life-history trait is remarkable, given that such traits are generally considered to be highly polygenic. These findings provide a dramatic illustration of how loci of large effect for adaptive traits can arise and be maintained over large geographical scales in natural populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Populus tremula, Local adaptation, Genomic basis, PtFT2, Adaptive traits, Selective sweep
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150175 (URN)10.1186/s13059-018-1444-y (DOI)000434210500001 ()29866176 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-07-18 Created: 2018-07-18 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Ratke, C., Terebieniec, B. K., Winestrand, S., Derba-Maceluch, M., Grahn, T., Schiffthaler, B., . . . Mellerowicz, E. J. (2018). Downregulating aspen xylan biosynthetic GT43 genes in developing wood stimulates growth via reprograming of the transcriptome. New Phytologist, 219(1), 230-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Downregulating aspen xylan biosynthetic GT43 genes in developing wood stimulates growth via reprograming of the transcriptome
Show others...
2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, Vol. 219, no 1, p. 230-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Xylan is one of the main compounds determining wood properties in hardwood species. The xylan backbone is thought to be synthesized by a synthase complex comprising two members of the GT43 family. We downregulated all GT43 genes in hybrid aspen (Populus tremulaxtremuloides) to understand their involvement in xylan biosynthesis.

All three clades of the GT43 family were targeted for downregulation using RNA interference individually or in different combinations, either constitutively or specifically in developing wood.

Simultaneous downregulation in developing wood of the B (IRX9) and C (IRX14) clades resulted in reduced xylan Xyl content relative to reducing end sequence, supporting their role in xylan backbone biosynthesis. This was accompanied by a higher lignocellulose saccharification efficiency. Unexpectedly, GT43 suppression in developing wood led to an overall growth stimulation, xylem cell wall thinning and a shift in cellulose orientation. Transcriptome profiling of these transgenic lines indicated that cell cycling was stimulated and secondary wall biosynthesis was repressed. We suggest that the reduced xylan elongation is sensed by the cell wall integrity surveying mechanism in developing wood.

Our results show that wood-specific suppression of xylan-biosynthetic GT43 genes activates signaling responses, leading to increased growth and improved lignocellulose saccharification.

Keywords
cellulose microfibril angle, GT43, Populus, saccharification, secondary wall, wood development, xylan biosynthesis
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150384 (URN)10.1111/nph.15160 (DOI)000434153200026 ()29708593 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046148362 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
Lin, Y.-C., Wang, J., Delhomme, N., Schiffthaler, B., Sundström, G., Zuccolo, A., . . . Street, N. R. (2018). Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(46), E10970-E10978
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional and evolutionary genomic inferences in Populus through genome and population sequencing of American and European aspen
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 46, p. E10970-E10978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Populus genus is one of the major plant model systems, but genomic resources have thus far primarily been available for poplar species, and primarily Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray), which was the first tree with a whole-genome assembly. To further advance evolutionary and functional genomic analyses in Populus, we produced genome assemblies and population genetics resources of two aspen species, Populus tremula L. and Populus tremuloides Michx. The two aspen species have distributions spanning the Northern Hemisphere, where they are keystone species supporting a wide variety of dependent communities and produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites. Our analyses show that the two aspens share a similar genome structure and a highly conserved gene content with P. trichocarpa but display substantially higher levels of heterozygosity. Based on population resequencing data, we observed widespread positive and negative selection acting on both coding and noncoding regions. Furthermore, patterns of genetic diversity and molecular evolution in aspen are influenced by a number of features, such as expression level, coexpression network connectivity, and regulatory variation. To maximize the community utility of these resources, we have integrated all presented data within the PopGenIE web resource (PopGenIE.org).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATL ACAD SCIENCES, 2018
Keywords
genome assembly, natural selection, coexpression, population genetics, Populus
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154950 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1801437115 (DOI)000449934400020 ()30373829 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056516875 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Akhter, S., Kretzschmar, W. W., Nordal, V., Delhomme, N., Street, N., Nilsson, O., . . . Sundström, J. F. (2018). Integrative analysis of three RNA sequencing methods identifies mutually exclusive exons of MADS-box isoforms during early bud development in Picea abies. Frontiers in Plant Science, 9, Article ID 1625.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrative analysis of three RNA sequencing methods identifies mutually exclusive exons of MADS-box isoforms during early bud development in Picea abies
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 1625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent efforts to sequence the genomes and transcriptomes of several gymnosperm species have revealed an increased complexity in certain gene families in gymnosperms as compared to angiosperms. One example of this is the gymnosperm sister Glade to angiosperm TM3-like MADS-box genes, which at least in the conifer lineage has expanded in number of genes. We have previously identified a member of this subclade, the conifer gene DEFICIENS AGAMOUS LIKE 19 (DAL19), as being specifically upregulated in cone-setting shoots. Here, we show through Sanger sequencing of mRNA-derived cDNA and mapping to assembled conifer genomic sequences that DAL19 produces six mature mRNA splice variants in Picea abies. These splice variants use alternate first and last exons, while their four central exons constitute a core region present in all six transcripts. Thus, they are likely to be transcript isoforms. Quantitative Real-Time PCR revealed that two mutually exclusive first DAL19 exons are differentially expressed across meristems that will form either male or female cones, or vegetative shoots. Furthermore, mRNA in situ hybridization revealed that two mutually exclusive last DAL19 exons were expressed in a cell-specific pattern within bud meristems. Based on these findings in DAL19, we developed a sensitive approach to transcript isoform assembly from short-read sequencing of mRNA. We applied this method to 42 putative MADS-box core regions in P abies, from which we assembled 1084 putative transcripts. We manually curated these transcripts to arrive at 933 assembled transcript isoforms of 38 putative MADS-box genes. 152 of these isoforms, which we assign to 28 putative MADS-box genes, were differentially expressed across eight female, male, and vegetative buds. We further provide evidence of the expression of 16 out of the 38 putative MADS-box genes by mapping PacBio Iso-Seq circular consensus reads derived from pooled sample sequencing to assembled transcripts. In summary, our analyses reveal the use of mutually exclusive exons of MADS-box gene isoforms during early bud development in P. abies, and we find that the large number of identified MADS-box transcripts in P. abies results not only from expansion of the gene family through gene duplication events but also from the generation of numerous splice variants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
Picea abies, MADS-box genes, cone development, De Bruijn assembly, transcript isoforms, RNA sequencing, DAL19
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153638 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2018.01625 (DOI)000449948700001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council Formas, 239-2013-650
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Haas, J. C., Street, N. R., Sjödin, A., Lee, N. M., Högberg, M. N., Näsholm, T. & Hurry, V. (2018). Microbial community response to growing season and plant nutrient optimisation in a boreal Norway spruce forest. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 125, 197-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial community response to growing season and plant nutrient optimisation in a boreal Norway spruce forest
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 125, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactions between Norway spruce trees and bacteria and fungi in nutrient limited boreal forests can be beneficial for tree growth and fitness. Tree-level effects of anthropogenic nutrient addition have been well studied, however understanding of the long-term effects on the associated microbiota is limited. Here, we report on the sensitivity of microbial community composition to the growing season and nutrient additions. Highthroughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal ITS1 region was used to characterise changes in the microbial community after application of a complete mineral nutrient mixture for five and 25 years. The experiment was conducted using the Flakaliden forest research site in northern boreal Sweden and included naturally low nutrient control plots. Needle and fine root samples of Norway spruce were sampled in addition to bulk soil during one growing season to provide comprehensive insight into phyllosphere and belowground microbiota community changes. The phyllosphere microbiota was compositionally distinct from the belowground communities and phyllosphere diversity increased significantly over the growing season but was not influenced by the improved nutrient status of the trees. In both root and soil samples, alpha diversity of fungal, in particular ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), and bacterial communities increased after long-term nutrient optimisation, and with increasing years of treatment the composition of the fungal and bacterial communities changed toward a community with a higher relative abundance of nitrophilic EMF and bacterial species but did not cause complete loss of nitrophobic species from the ecosystem. From this, we conclude that 25 years of continuous nutrient addition to a boreal spruce stand increased phylotype richness and diversity of the microbiota in the soil, and at the root-soil interface, suggesting that long-term anthropogenic nutrient inputs can have positive effects on belowground biodiversity that may enhance ecosystem robustness. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of these changes to the microbiota on ecosystem carbon storage and nitrogen cycling in boreal forests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Boreal forest, Ectomycorrhiza, Microbial community composition, Norway spruce, Balanced nutrient addition, Illumina MiSeq
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151103 (URN)10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.07.005 (DOI)000444660400020 ()
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Grimberg, Å., Lager, I., Street, N., Robinson, K. M., Marttila, S., Mähler, N., . . . Bhalerao, R. P. (2018). Storage lipid accumulation is controlled by photoperiodic signal acting via regulators of growth cessation and dormancy in hybrid aspen. New Phytologist, 219(2), 619-630
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storage lipid accumulation is controlled by photoperiodic signal acting via regulators of growth cessation and dormancy in hybrid aspen
Show others...
2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 219, no 2, p. 619-630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The signalling pathways that control seasonal modulation of carbon metabolism in perennial plants are poorly understood. Using genetic, metabolic and natural variation approaches, we identify factors mediating photoperiodic control of storage lipid accumulation in the model tree hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides). We characterized lipid accumulation in transgenic hybrid aspen with impaired photoperiodic and hormonal responses. Genome-wide association mapping was performed in Swedish aspen (P.tremula) genotypes to determine genetic loci associated with genotype variation in lipid content. Our data show that the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulates in cambial meristem and pith rays of aspen in response to photoperiodic signal controlling growth cessation and dormancy induction. We show that photoperiodic control of TAG accumulation is mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS T/CONSTANS module, which also controls the induction of growth cessation. Hormonal and chromatin remodelling pathways also contribute to TAG accumulation by photoperiodic signal. Natural variation exists in lipid accumulation that is controlled by input from multiple loci. Our data shed light on how the control of storage metabolism is temporally coordinated with growth cessation and dormancy by photoperiodic signal, and reveals that storage lipid accumulation between seeds and perennating organs of trees may involve distinct regulatory circuits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
abscisic acid (ABA), dormancy, flowering time, growth cessation, lipid biosynthesis, photoperiod, trees, triacylglycerol
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150755 (URN)10.1111/nph.15197 (DOI)000435948500017 ()29761498 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-27 Created: 2018-08-27 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Jokipii-Lukkari, S., Delhomme, N., Schiffthaler, B., Mannapperuma, C., Prestele, J., Nilsson, O., . . . Tuominen, H. (2018). Transcriptional Roadmap to Seasonal Variation in Wood Formation of Norway Spruce. Plant Physiology, 176(4), 2851-2870
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptional Roadmap to Seasonal Variation in Wood Formation of Norway Spruce
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, no 4, p. 2851-2870Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seasonal cues influence several aspects of the secondary growth of tree stems, including cambial activity, wood chemistry, and transition to latewood formation. We investigated seasonal changes in cambial activity, secondary cell wall formation, and tracheid cell death in woody tissues of Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout one seasonal cycle. RNA sequencing was performed simultaneously in both the xylem and cambium/phloem tissues of the stem. Principal component analysis revealed gradual shifts in the transcriptomes that followed a chronological order throughout the season. A notable remodeling of the transcriptome was observed in the winter, with many genes having maximal expression during the coldest months of the year. A highly coexpressed set of monolignol biosynthesis genes showed high expression during the period of secondary cell wall formation as well as a second peak in midwinter. This midwinter peak in expression did not trigger lignin deposition, as determined by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Coexpression consensus network analyses suggested the involvement of transcription factors belonging to the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES and MYELOBLASTOSIS-HOMEOBOX families in the seasonal control of secondary cell wall formation of tracheids. Interestingly, the lifetime of the latewood tracheids stretched beyond the winter dormancy period, correlating with a lack of cell death-related gene expression. Our transcriptomic analyses combined with phylogenetic and microscopic analyses also identified the cellulose and lignin biosynthetic genes and putative regulators for latewood formation and tracheid cell death in Norway spruce, providing a toolbox for further physiological and functional assays of these important phase transitions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2018
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148642 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.01590 (DOI)000429089100021 ()29487121 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0305The Kempe Foundations, SMK-1340Swedish Research Council, 621-2013-4949VINNOVA, 2015-02290
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Reza, S. H., Delhomme, N., Street, N. R., Ramachandran, P., Dalman, K., Nilsson, O., . . . Bozhkov, P. V. (2018). Transcriptome analysis of embryonic domains in Norway spruce reveals potential regulators of suspensor cell death. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0192945.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transcriptome analysis of embryonic domains in Norway spruce reveals potential regulators of suspensor cell death
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0192945Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The terminal differentiation and elimination of the embryo-suspensor is the earliest manifestation of programmed cell death (PCD) during plant ontogenesis. Molecular regulation of suspensor PCD remains poorly understood. Norway spruce (Picea abies) embryos provide a powerful model for studying embryo development because of their large size, sequenced genome, and the possibility to obtain a large number of embryos at a specific developmental stage through somatic embryogenesis. Here, we have carried out global gene expression analysis of the Norway spruce embryo-suspensor versus embryonal mass (a gymnosperm analogue of embryo proper) using RNA sequencing. We have identified that suspensors have enhanced expression of the NAC domain-containing transcription factors, XND1 and ANAC075, previously shown to be involved in the initiation of developmental PCD in Arabidiopsis. The analysis has also revealed enhanced expression of Norway spruce homologues of the known executioners of both developmental and stress-induced cell deaths, such as metacaspase 9 (MC9), cysteine endopeptidase-1 (CEP1) and ribonuclease 3 (RNS3). Interestingly, a spruce homologue of bax inhibitor-1 (PaBI-1, for Picea abies BI-1), an evolutionarily conserved cell death suppressor, was likewise up-regulated in the embryosuspensor. Since Arabidopsis BI-1 so far has been implicated only in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress induced cell death, we investigated its role in embryogenesis and suspensor PCD using RNA interference (RNAi). We have found that PaBI-1-deficient lines formed a large number of abnormal embryos with suppressed suspensor elongation and disturbed polarity. Cytochemical staining of suspensor cells has revealed that PaBI-1 deficiency suppresses vacuolar cell death and induces necrotic type of cell death previously shown to compromise embryo development. This study demonstrates that a large number of cell-death components are conserved between angiosperms and gymnosperms and establishes a new role for BI-1 in the progression of vacuolar cell death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146145 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0192945 (DOI)000426472300004 ()29499063 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Laitinen, T., Morreel, K., Delhomme, N., Gauthier, A., Schiffthaler, B., Nickolov, K., . . . Kärkönen, A. (2017). A Key Role for Apoplastic H2O2 in Norway Spruce Phenolic Metabolism. Plant Physiology, 174(3), 1449-1475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Key Role for Apoplastic H2O2 in Norway Spruce Phenolic Metabolism
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 174, no 3, p. 1449-1475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Apoplastic events such as monolignol oxidation and lignin polymerization are difficult to study in intact trees. To investigate the role of apoplastic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in gymnosperm phenolic metabolism, an extracellular lignin-forming cell culture of Norway spruce (Picea abies) was used as a research model. Scavenging of apoplastic H2O2 by potassium iodide repressed lignin formation, in line with peroxidases activating monolignols for lignin polymerization. Time-course analyses coupled to candidate substrate-product pair network propagation revealed differential accumulation of low-molecular-weight phenolics, including (glycosylated) oligolignols, (glycosylated) flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins, in lignin-forming and H2O2-scavenging cultures and supported that monolignols are oxidatively coupled not only in the cell wall but also in the cytoplasm, where they are coupled to other monolignols and proanthocyanidins. Dilignol glycoconjugates with reduced structures were found in the culture medium, suggesting that cells are able to transport glycosylated dilignols to the apoplast. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that scavenging of apoplastic H2O2 resulted in remodulation of the transcriptome, with reduced carbon flux into the shikimate pathway propagating down to monolignol biosynthesis. Aggregated coexpression network analysis identified candidate enzymes and transcription factors for monolignol oxidation and apoplastic H2O2 production in addition to potential H2O2 receptors. The results presented indicate that the redox state of the apoplast has a profound influence on cellular metabolism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2017
National Category
Cell Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138557 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.00085 (DOI)000404233000014 ()28522458 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sundell, D., Street, N. R., Kumar, M., Mellerowicz, E. J., Kucukoglu, M., Johnsson, C., . . . Hvidsten, T. R. (2017). AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula. The Plant Cell, 29(7), 1585-1604
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula
Show others...
2017 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1585-1604Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network.

National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139016 (URN)10.1105/tpc.17.00153 (DOI)000407495000008 ()
Available from: 2017-09-06 Created: 2017-09-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6031-005x

Search in DiVA

Show all publications