umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Haraldsson, Susann
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Kautto, M., Kampman, O., Mononen, N., Lehtimaki, T., Haraldsson, S., Koivisto, P. A. & Leinonen, E. (2015). Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene polymorphisms: Susceptibility and treatment response of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression. Neuroscience Letters, 590, 116-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene polymorphisms: Susceptibility and treatment response of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 590, p. 116-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and norepinephrine transporter (NET182C) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility and treatment response in major depressive disorder (MDD). Thus, we examined association between these polymorphisms and susceptibility to treatment resistant depression, and treatment response in severe MDD patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

In total, 119 Finnish patients with treatment resistant depression and 395 healthy volunteer blood donors were genotyped. Depression severity was assessed using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale (MADRS), with MADRS score change during ECT the treatment response indicator.

Underrepresentation of the 5-HTTLPR 1/1 genotype in the NET TT subgroup was observed in patients compared with controls. There were no genotype or allele frequency differences between patients and control groups separately. Patients with combined 5-HTTLPR 1/1 and NET TT genotypes also had poorer treatment responses than other patients. No differences in ECT response were observed when the polymorphisms were examined separately.

Our results suggest that a NET 182C and 5-HTTLPR polymorphism interaction is associated with susceptibility to treatment resistant depression and ECT treatment response in antidepressant resistant depression patients. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
5-HTTLPR, NET, Gene polymorphism, Treatment resistant depression, ECT, Treatment response
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102449 (URN)10.1016/j.neulet.2015.01.077 (DOI)000350925100022 ()25650523 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-28 Created: 2015-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Andre, K., Kampman, O., Illi, A., Viikki, M., Setala-Soikkeli, E., Mononen, N., . . . Leinonen, E. (2015). SERT and NET polymorphisms, temperament and antidepressant response. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 69(7), 531-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SERT and NET polymorphisms, temperament and antidepressant response
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The genetic variations in norepinephrine transporter (NET) and serotonin transporter (SERT) genes have been associated with personality traits, several psychiatric disorders and the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. Aims: We investigated the separate effects and possible interactions between NET T-182C (rs2242446) and SERT 5-HTTLPR (rs4795541) polymorphisms on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) treatment response and temperamental traits assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in a clinical sample of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: Our sample of 97 patients with major depression completed the 107-item TCI temperament questionnaire (version IX) at the initial assessment of the study and after 6 weeks of follow-up. All subjects received selective SSRI medications. Temperament dimension scores at baseline (1) and endpoint (2) during antidepressant treatment were analyzed between NET and SERT genotypes. Results: SS-genotype of 5-HTTLPR was associated with higher baseline Persistence scores than SL- or LL-genotype. A corresponding but weaker association was found at endpoint. No differences were found between 5-HTTLPR genotypes and other temperament dimensions and 5-HTTLPR genotypes had no effect on treatment response. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the SS-genotype of 5-HTTLPR is associated with Persistence scores in patients with MDD. Higher Persistence could be viewed as a negative trait when recovering from stress and its association with short and "weaker" S-allele may be related to less efficient serotonin neurotransmission, possibly resulting in less effective coping strategies on a behavioral level.

Keywords
Antidepressant treatment, Depression, NET, SERT, Temperament
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117874 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2015.1012554 (DOI)000369972000006 ()25739526 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Degerman, S., Domellöf, M., Landfors, M., Linder, J., Lundin, M., Haraldsson, S., . . . Forsgren, L. (2014). Long Leukocyte Telomere Length at Diagnosis Is a Risk Factor for Dementia Progression in Idiopathic Parkinsonism. PLoS ONE, 9(12), Article ID e113387.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long Leukocyte Telomere Length at Diagnosis Is a Risk Factor for Dementia Progression in Idiopathic Parkinsonism
Show others...
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e113387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Telomere length (TL) is regarded as a marker of cellular aging due to the gradual shortening by each cell division, but is influenced by a number of factors including oxidative stress and inflammation. Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism occur mainly in the elderly, with oxidative stress and inflammation in afflicted cells. In this study the relationship between blood TL and prognosis of 168 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism (136 Parkinson's disease [PD], 17 Progressive Supranuclear Palsy [PSP], and 15 Multiple System Atrophy [MSA]) and 30 controls was investigated. TL and motor and cognitive performance were assessed at baseline (diagnosis) and repeatedly up to three to five years follow up. No difference in TL between controls and patients was shown at baseline, nor any significant difference in TL stability or attrition during follow up. Interestingly, a significant relationship between TL at diagnosis and cognitive phenotype at follow up in PD and PSP patients was found, with longer mean TL at diagnosis in patients that developed dementia within three years.

National Category
Basic Medicine Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-99223 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0113387 (DOI)000346375400009 ()
Available from: 2015-04-20 Created: 2015-02-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Illi, A., Poutanen, O., Setala-Soikkeli, E., Kampman, O., Viikki, M., Huhtala, H., . . . Lehtimaki, T. (2011). Is 5-HTTLPR linked to the response of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in MDD?. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 261(2), 95-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is 5-HTTLPR linked to the response of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in MDD?
Show others...
2011 (English)In: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491, Vol. 261, no 2, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of a functional polymorphism in the transcriptional control region of serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, SERTPR) has been studied intensively in major depression and in the response to selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs) in major depression. The findings have been contradictory, although majority of the studies indicate that the short allele is associated with poor response to SSRIs in major depression. In the present study, we evaluated the association of 5-HTTLPR with treatment response to SSRI medication in Finnish Caucasian MDD patients. A secondary purpose was to study the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. The aim of the study was to replicate the previous findings in this area. Primary outcomes of the treatment were remission, defined by an exit score of seven or less, and response, defined by a reduction of at least 50% on the MADRS. We had also a control population of 375 healthy blood donors, as a secondary objective was to evaluate the possible association of this particular polymorphism with major depressive disorder. Twenty-nine of the 85 (34.1%) patients reached the remission and 58.8% achieved the predefined response criteria. The l/l genotype of 5-HTTLPR was presented in 51.7% of those patients who achieved remission vs. 25.0% in the non-remitters (P = 0.03). The result remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, gender, medication and MADRS points at the study entry. However, the small sample size limits the reliability of this result.

Keywords
Serotonin transporter, 5-HTTLPR, MDD, SSRI, Drug response
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104488 (URN)10.1007/s00406-010-0126-x (DOI)000287859300003 ()20640435 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Köhn, L., Kadzhaev, K., Burstedt, M. S., Haraldsson, S., Sandgren, O. & Golovleva, I. (2008). Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families.. In: Robert E. Anderson, Matthew M. LaVail, Joe G. Hollyfield (Ed.), Recent Advances in Retinal Degeneration. Paper presented at the XII International Symposium on Retinal Degeneration (also known as RD2006) held October 23-28, 2006 in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina (pp. 229-234). Springer, 613
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families.
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Recent Advances in Retinal Degeneration / [ed] Robert E. Anderson, Matthew M. LaVail, Joe G. Hollyfield, Springer , 2008, Vol. 613, p. 229-234Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2008
Series
Advances in experimental medicine and biology
Keywords
PYK2-binding, cone dystrophy
National Category
Ophthalmology Genetics
Research subject
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-35500 (URN)10.1007/978-0-387-74904-4_26 (DOI)18188949 (PubMedID)744 (Local ID)978-0-387-74902-0 (ISBN)744 (Archive number)744 (OAI)
Conference
the XII International Symposium on Retinal Degeneration (also known as RD2006) held October 23-28, 2006 in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina
Available from: 2010-08-20 Created: 2010-08-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Köhn, L., Kadzhaev, K., Burstedt, M. S., Haraldsson, S., Hallberg, B., Sandgren, O. & Golovleva, I. (2007). Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families. European Journal of Human Genetics, 15(6), 664-671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families
Show others...
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 664-671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) (MIM 600977) is a rare disease predominantly affecting cone photoreceptors. Here we refine the CORD5 locus previously mapped to 17p13 from 27 to 14.3 cM and identified a missense mutation, Q626H in the phosphatidylinositol transfer (PIT) membrane-associated protein (PITPNM3) (MIM 608921) in two Swedish families. PITPNM3, known as a human homologue of the Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB), lacks the N-terminal PIT domain needed for transport of phospholipids, renewal of photoreceptors membrane and providing the electroretinogram (ERG) response to light. In our study, the mutation causing CORD5 is located in the C-terminal region interacting with a member of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases, PYK2. Our finding on the first mutation in the human homologue of Drosophila rdgB indicates novel pathways and a potential important role of the PITPNM3 in mammalian phototransduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature publishing group, 2007
Keywords
cone rod dystrophy; PITPNM3;rdgB; missense mutation
National Category
Medical Genetics
Research subject
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-26970 (URN)10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201817 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-11-05 Created: 2009-11-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Malmer, B., Haraldsson, S., Einarsdottir, E., Lindgren, P. & Holmberg, D. (2005). Homozygosity mapping of familial glioma in Northern Sweden. Acta Oncol, 44(2), 114-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Homozygosity mapping of familial glioma in Northern Sweden
Show others...
2005 (English)In: Acta Oncol, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 114-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14503 (URN)doi:10.1080/02841860510007558 (DOI)15788289 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-09-14 Created: 2007-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Einarsdottir, E., Söderström, I., Löfgren-Burström, A., Haraldsson, S., Nilsson-Ardnor, S., Penha-Goncalves, C., . . . Holmberg, D. (2003). The CTLA4 region as a general autoimmunity factor: an extended pedigree provides evidence for synergy with the HLA locus in the etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease. European Journal of Human Genetics, 11(1), 81-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The CTLA4 region as a general autoimmunity factor: an extended pedigree provides evidence for synergy with the HLA locus in the etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease
Show others...
2003 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 81-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have identified a large family in the northern part of Sweden with multiple cases of autoimmune diseases, namely type 1 diabetes (T1D), Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The family members affected by any of these diseases share a region of 2.4 Mb that comprises among others the CTLA4 gene. We determined that all affected members of the family shared the HLA susceptibility haplotype (DR4-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302). Analysis of genetic interaction conditioning for HLA haplotype provided strong evidence that the critical region which includes the CTLA4 gene acts together with the HLA locus on the etiology of disease (lodscore 4.20 (theta=0.0). The study of this family allowed us to: (1) reinforce a number of reports on linkage and association of the CTLA4 region to T1D and AITD; (2) demonstrate that a single haplotypic variant in this region constitutes an etiological factor to disease susceptibility in T1D, GD and HT; (3) reveal a strong genetic interaction of the CTLA4 and HLA loci in the genetic architecture of autoimmune disease; (4) emphasise the value of large pedigrees drawn from isolated populations as tools to single out the effect of individual loci in the etiology of complex diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2003
Keywords
type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease, CTLA4, HLA, linkage
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4492 (URN)10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200903 (DOI)12529710 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2005-04-15 Created: 2005-04-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications