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Andersson, Linus
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Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Jonsson, K. & Andersson, L. (2018). Den undflyende lukten. Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, 27(1-2), 14-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Den undflyende lukten
2018 (Swedish)In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 14-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Fleeting Sense of Smell (Den undflyende lukten)

This is an overview of the elusive sense of smell, both from a historical/cultural and psychological perspective. We follow two themes. In the first, we describe the repeated efforts to understand and categorize human olfaction, from antiquity to present day. We disseminate how smell has been positioned in sensory hierarchies, describe odor classifications systems and discuss differing views on the relationship between odor and health. The second theme regards how odors and the sense

itself has been used as a means for understanding, separating and classifying other phenomena. Odors have throughout history been used to de- marcate class boundaries; the (non-)reliance of the sense of smell has been seen as an indication of civilization. Olfactory acuity is used to separate humans from animals, women from men, and young from old. These smell-based taxonomies persist, despite having no clear backing from em- pirical evidence. Finally, we suggest that the inter- est in smell may be on the rise, both from a societal and scientific perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: , 2018
Keywords
smell, olfaction, history, culture, psychology, categorization.
National Category
Ethnology
Research subject
Psychology; History Of Sciences and Ideas
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154684 (URN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M14-0375:1
Available from: 2018-12-24 Created: 2018-12-24 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Sandberg, P., Olofsson, J. K. & Nordin, S. (2018). Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses. Chemical Senses, 43(2), 129-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Task Demands on Olfactory, Auditory, and Visual Event-Related Potentials Suggest Similar Top-Down Modulation Across Senses
2018 (English)In: Chemical Senses, ISSN 0379-864X, E-ISSN 1464-3553, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A widely held view is that top-down modulation of sensory information relies on an amodal control network that acts through the thalamus to regulate incoming signals. Olfaction lacks a direct thalamic projection, which suggests that it may differ from other modalities in this regard. We investigated the late positive complex (LPC) amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) from 28 participants, elicited by intensity-matched olfactory, auditory and visual stimuli, during a condition of focused attention, a neutral condition, and a condition in which stimuli were to be actively ignored. Amplitudes were largest during the attend condition, lowest during the ignore condition, with the neutral condition in between. A Bayesian analysis resulted in strong evidence for similar effects of task across sensory modalities. We conclude that olfaction, despite its unique neural projections, does not differ from audition and vision in terms of task-dependent neural modulation of the LPC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
attention, audition, electrophysiology, late positive complex, olfaction, vision
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145156 (URN)10.1093/chemse/bjx082 (DOI)000424225200007 ()29325013 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Aazh, H., Knipper, M., Danesh, A. A., Cavanna, A. E., Andersson, L., Paulin, J., . . . Moore, B. C. J. (2018). Insights from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis: Causes, Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Noise & Health, 20(95), 162-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis: Causes, Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment
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2018 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 20, no 95, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hyperacusis is intolerance of certain everyday sounds that causes significant distress and impairment in social, occupational, recreational, and other day-to-day activities. Objective: The aim of this report is to summarize the key findings and conclusions from the Third International Conference on Hyperacusis. Topics covered: The main topics discussed comprise (1) diagnosis of hyperacusis and audiological evaluations, (2) neurobiological aspect of hyperacusis, (3) misophonia, (4) hyperacusis in autism spectrum disorder, (5) noise sensitivity, (6) hyperacusis-related distress and comorbid psychiatric illness, and (7) audiologist-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for hyperacusis. Conclusions: Implications for research and clinical practice are summarised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2018
Keywords
Audiology, auditory system, hyperacusis, misophonia, noise sensitivity
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151568 (URN)10.4103/nah.NAH_2_18 (DOI)000442780700005 ()30136676 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
Lind, N., Söderholm, A., Palmquist, E., Andersson, L., Millqvist, E. & Nordin, S. (2017). Comorbidity and multimorbidity of asthma and allergy and intolerance to chemicals and certain buildings. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 59(1), 80-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity and multimorbidity of asthma and allergy and intolerance to chemicals and certain buildings
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 80-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: We tested the hypothesis of high comorbidity between asthma/allergy and chemical intolerance (CI) and between asthma/allergy and building intolerance (BI), and high multimorbidity between asthma/allergy, CI, and BI.

Methods: Population-based questionnaire data were used from 530 participants with asthma/allergy (allergic asthma, nonallergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, and/or atopic dermatitis), 414 with self-reported and 112 with physician-diagnosed CI, and 165 with self-reported and 47 with physician-diagnosed BI. Separate reference groups were formed for each of the five case groups.

Results: Adjusted odds ratios varied from 4.6 to 13.1 for comorbidity, and from 6.6 to 46.4 for multimorbidity.

Conclusion: The large comorbidity and multimorbidity between asthma/allergy, CI, and BI evokes the question as to whether there are similarities in underlying mechanisms between these conditions.

Keywords
Allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, multiple chemical sensitivity, nonspecific building-related symptoms
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97469 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000000930 (DOI)000391123100015 ()
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nordin, S., Aldrin, L., Claeson, A.-S. & Andersson, L. (2017). Effects of Negative Affectivity and Odor Valence on Chemosensory and Symptom Perception and Perceived Ability to Focus on a Cognitive Task. Perception, 46(3-4), 431-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Negative Affectivity and Odor Valence on Chemosensory and Symptom Perception and Perceived Ability to Focus on a Cognitive Task
2017 (English)In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to gain understanding for the impact of negative affectivity (NA) and odor valance on perceptual aspects during low-level odorous exposure. Fifty-five young adults who were either relatively low or high in NA (anxiety, depression, and somatization) were randomized for exposure to either limonene (pleasant odor) or pyridine (unpleasant odor). In an exposure chamber, they took part in baseline, blank and stable exposure sessions, during which they rated odor intensity, impact on ability to focus on an imagined cognitive task, and intensity of symptoms. The results showed higher ratings of negative impact on ability to focus during exposure to the unpleasant odor compared with the pleasant odor, and an association between NA and symptom intensity, with 18% of the variance in symptom intensity explained by somatization. The association between NA and symptom intensity was found to be driven by the factor sex. These results imply (a) that prior findings of odorous exposure that interfere negatively with work performance may be due to impact of an unpleasant odor on ability to focus on cognitive tasks and (b) that there are associations between NA, sex, and symptoms that may partly be referred to attentiveness to and interpretation of bodily sensations.

Keywords
anxiety, depression, human exposure, olfaction, pleasantness, somatization
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133802 (URN)10.1177/0301006616686990 (DOI)000397168400015 ()28094658 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Dantoft, T. M., Skovbjerg, S., Andersson, L., Claeson, A.-S., Engkilde, K., Lind, N., . . . Hellgren, L. I. (2017). Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session. BMJ Open, 7(2), Article ID e013879.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session
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2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 2, article id e013879Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants. The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom=-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n=-butanol exposure.

Design: Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure.

Settings: Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper.

Participants: 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls.

Outcome measures: 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels.

Results: MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls.

Conclusions: MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate MCS participants from controls based on gene expression measured after the exposure.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133669 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013879 (DOI)000397872400106 ()28232466 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-25 Created: 2017-04-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, L., Claeson, A.-S., Nyberg, L. & Nordin, S. (2017). Short-term olfactory sensitization involves brain networks relevant for pain, and indicates chemical intolerance. International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), 220(2), 503-509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-term olfactory sensitization involves brain networks relevant for pain, and indicates chemical intolerance
2017 (English)In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 220, no 2, p. 503-509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemical intolerance is a medically unexplained affliction that implies deleterious reactions to non-toxic everyday chemical exposure. Sensitization (i.e. increased reactivity to repeated, invariant stimulation) to odorous stimulation is an important component in theoretical explanations of chemical intolerance, but empirical evidence is scarce. We hypothesized that (1) individuals who sensitize to repeated olfactory stimulation, compared with those who habituate, would express a lower blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) response in key inhibitory areas such as the rACC, and higher signal in pain/saliency detection regions, as well as primary and/or secondary olfactory projection areas; and (2) olfactory sensitization, compared with habituation, would be associated with greater self-reported chemical intolerance. More-over, we assessed whether olfactory sensitization was paralleled by comparable trigeminal processing - in terms of perceptual ratings and BOLD responses. We grouped women from a previous functional magnetic imaging study based on intensity ratings of repeated amyl acetate exposure over time. Fourteen women sensitized to the exposure, 15 habituated, and 20 were considered "intermediate" (i.e. neither sensitizers nor habituaters). Olfactory sensitizers, compared with habituaters, displayed a BOLD-pattern in line with the hypothesis, and reported greater problems with odours in everyday life. They also expressed greater reactions to CO2 in terms of both perceived intensity and BOLD signal. The similarities with pain are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Chemical intolerance, Olfactory, Trigeminal, Sensitization, Smell, fMRI
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135983 (URN)10.1016/j.ijheh.2017.02.002 (DOI)000401215300022 ()28254164 (PubMedID)
Note

Part B.

Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claeson, A.-S. & Andersson, L. (2017). Symptoms from masked acrolein exposure suggest altered trigeminal reactivity in chemical intolerance. Neurotoxicology, 60, 92-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms from masked acrolein exposure suggest altered trigeminal reactivity in chemical intolerance
2017 (English)In: Neurotoxicology, ISSN 0161-813X, E-ISSN 1872-9711, Vol. 60, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Chemical intolerance (CI) is a widespread occupational and public health problem characterized by symptoms that reportedly result from low-levels of chemical exposure. The mechanisms behind CI are unknown, however modifications of the chemical senses (rather than toxic processes) have been suggested as key components. The aim of this study was to investigate whether individuals with self-reported CI report more sensory irritation during masked acrolein exposure compared to controls without CI. Methods: Individuals with CI (n = 18) and controls without CI (n = 19) were exposed in an exposure chamber. Each participant took part in two exposure conditions – one with heptane (the masking compound), and one with heptane and acrolein at a dose below previously reported sensory irritation thresholds. The exposures lasted for 60 min. Symptoms and confidence ratings were measured continuously throughout the exposure as were measurements of electrodermal activity and self-reported tear-film break-up time. Participants were blind to exposure condition. Results: Individuals with CI, compared with controls reported greater sensory irritation in the eyes, nose and throat when exposed to acrolein masked with heptane. There was no difference during exposure to heptane. Conclusions: Masked exposure to acrolein at a concentration below the previously reported detection threshold is perceived as more irritating by individuals with CI compared with controls. The results indicate that there is altered trigeminal reactivity in those with CI compared to controls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Human exposure, Acrolein, Chemical intolerance, TRPA1, Trigeminal reactivity
National Category
Applied Psychology Neurosciences Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136783 (URN)10.1016/j.neuro.2017.03.007 (DOI)000403133600010 ()28359837 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2010–1401
Note

Special issue.

Available from: 2017-06-22 Created: 2017-06-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Paulin, J., Andersson, L. & Nordin, S. (2016). Characteristics of hyperacusis in the general population. Noise & Health, 18(83), 178-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of hyperacusis in the general population
2016 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 18, no 83, p. 178-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for better understanding of various characteristics in hyperacusis in the general population. The objectives of the present study were to investigate individuals in the general population with hyperacusis regarding demographics, lifestyle, perceived general health and hearing ability, hyperacusis-specific characteristics and behavior, and comorbidity. Using data from a large-scale population-based questionnaire study, we investigated individuals with physician-diagnosed (n=66) and self-reported (n=313) hyperacusis in comparison to individuals without hyperacusis (n=2995). High age, female sex, and high education were associated with hyperacusis, and that trying to avoid sound sources, being able to affect the sound environment, and having sough medical attention were common reactions and behaviors. Posttraumatic stress disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, exhaustion, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine, hearing impairment, tinnitus, and back/joint/muscle disorders were comorbid with hyperacusis. The results provide ground for future study of these characteristic features being risk factors for development of hyperacusis and/or consequences of hyperacusis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Medknow Publications, 2016
Keywords
Functional somatic syndrome, hyperacusis, noise sensitivity, prevalence, psychiatric disorder, sound intolerance
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126759 (URN)10.4103/1463-1741.189244 (DOI)000383904300002 ()27569405 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-10-18 Created: 2016-10-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Dantoft, T. M., Andersson, L., Nordin, S. & Skovbjerg, S. (2015). Chemical Intolerance. Current Rheumatology Reviews, 11(2), 167-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical Intolerance
2015 (English)In: Current Rheumatology Reviews, ISSN 1573-3971, E-ISSN 1875-6360, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI are available, the presence of the condition can only be established in accordance to criteria definitions. Numerous modes of action have been suggested to explain CI, with the most commonly discussed theories involving the immune system, central nervous system, olfactory and respiratory systems as well as altered metabolic capacity, behavioral conditioning and emotional regulation. However, in spite of more than 50 years of research, there is still a great deal of uncertainties regarding the event(s) and underlying mechanism( s) behind symptom elicitation. As a result, patients are often misdiagnosed or offered health care solutions with limited or no effect, and they experience being met with mistrust and doubt by health care professionals, the social care system and by friends and relatives. Evidence-based treatment options are currently unavailable, however, a person-centered care model based on a multidisciplinary treatment approach and individualized care plans have shown promising results. With this in mind, further research studies and health care solutions should be based on a multifactorial and interdisciplinary approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham Science, 2015
Keywords
Chemical intolerance, coping, management strategies, multiple chemical sensitivity, pathophysiology, review, risk factors, sensitization
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-106872 (URN)10.2174/157339711102150702111101 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-08-11 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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