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Johansson Sevä, IngemarORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3349-5778
Publications (10 of 25) Show all publications
Fors, F., Johansson Sevä, I. & Gärling, T. (2020). How does time pressure influence emotional wellbeing?: Investigating the roles of domain satisfaction and neuroticism among small-business owners. International Journal of Wellbeing, 10(2), 19-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does time pressure influence emotional wellbeing?: Investigating the roles of domain satisfaction and neuroticism among small-business owners
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Wellbeing, ISSN 1179-8602, E-ISSN 1179-8602, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

Emotional wellbeing is related to the balance of positive and negative emotions associated with activities at work and in free time. We conjecture that time pressure is a factor reducing positive emotions and amplifying negative emotions, such that it has a negative relationship to emotional wellbeing. We found this to be the case in two studies based on survey data derived from samples of small-business owners in Sweden. In Study 1, the relationship between time pressure and emotional wellbeing is negative for small-business owners as well as for employed wage earners, although at work the former group experience both higher time pressure and higher emotional wellbeing than the latter. No differences in free time between the groups are observed. Study 2 provides support for the hypothesis that, both at work and in free time, domain satisfaction partially mediates the negative relationship between time pressure and emotional wellbeing. Supporting two additional hypotheses, the results indicate that neuroticism has a direct negative relationship with emotional wellbeing, and also an indirect relationship with emotional wellbeing mediated by time pressure, and furthermore moderates the negative relationship between time pressure and emotional wellbeing.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168020 (URN)
Available from: 2020-02-10 Created: 2020-02-10 Last updated: 2020-02-19
Fors, F., Johansson Sevä, I. & Gärling, T. (2020). The Bigger the Better? Business Size and Small-Business Owners’ Subjective Well-Being. Journal of Happiness Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Bigger the Better? Business Size and Small-Business Owners’ Subjective Well-Being
2020 (English)In: Journal of Happiness Studies, ISSN 1389-4978, E-ISSN 1573-7780Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Business growth is often portrayed as an important outcome for small-business owners. Few empirical studies have however examined whether there is a positive relationship between business size and different dimensions of small-business owners’ subjective well-being. In a large cross-sectional sample (n = 1089) of small-business owners from Sweden, we investigate the relationship between business size and the two main components of subjective well-being, life satisfaction and emotional well-being. By means of structural equation modelling, we determine the importance of business size for subjective well-being by focusing on potential advantages (financial satisfaction) and disadvantages (time pressure) related to business size. The results show that there is no overall relationship between business size and life satisfaction, but a weak negative relationship between business size and emotional well-being. However, in a subsequent mediation analyses we find that these findings largely can be explained by the fact that financial satisfaction and time pressure relate to subjective well-being in opposite directions and thus cancel each other out. The results of the mediation analysis also reveal differences across the two components of subjective well-being. We here find that financial satisfaction is more important for small-business owners’ life satisfaction while time pressure is more important for their emotional well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Self-employment, Subjective well-being, Life satisfaction, Emotional wellbeing, Financial satisfaction, Time pressure, Business size
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Social Psychology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-171086 (URN)10.1007/s10902-020-00264-2 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-05-26 Created: 2020-05-26 Last updated: 2020-05-26
Hardell, S., Johansson Sevä, I. & Öun, I. (2020). Welfare service privatization and opinions about service quality: The role of political ideology among local politicians and the public. Social Policy & Administration, 54(1), 45-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Welfare service privatization and opinions about service quality: The role of political ideology among local politicians and the public
2020 (English)In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we join the discussion about the potential consequences of welfare service privatization by examining the relationship between the privatization of welfare service delivery and public opinion about service quality in Sweden. Due to the politically polarized debate about welfare service privatization in Sweden, we also examine the extent to which individuals' ideological orientations influence this relationship in both local politicians and ordinary citizens. For local politicians, the results show that a higher municipal degree of privatization is generally associated with slightly lower levels of satisfaction overall with welfare services, although no such relationship exists for the public. Most importantly, however, the results indicate that political ideology constitutes an important moderator in the relationship between privatization and opinions about service quality. Local politicians and, to some extent, ordinary citizens who place themselves to the left on the ideological left–right scale tend to be less satisfied with services as the municipal degree of welfare service privatization increases. For local politicians who position themselves far to the right on the scale, the relationship between welfare service privatization and satisfaction is positive. These findings suggest that there is no clear-cut relationship between privatization and individuals' opinions about services; rather, this relationship depends on the ideological predispositions of local politicians and ordinary citizens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2020
Keywords
local politicians, political ideology, welfare service privatization, Sweden, welfare service delivery, welfare service
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-160070 (URN)10.1111/spol.12509 (DOI)000527245600004 ()2-s2.0-85067666285 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-1733
Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2020-05-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson Sevä, I. & Öun, I. (2019). Conditional representation: Gendered experiences of combining work and family among local politicians. Journal of women, politics & policy, 40(3), 367-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conditional representation: Gendered experiences of combining work and family among local politicians
2019 (English)In: Journal of women, politics & policy, ISSN 1554-4788, E-ISSN 1554-4788, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 367-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article focuses on working and living conditions among local politicians in Sweden, and on their experiences of combining political work and family life. Applying a sociological perspective on representation, we first map the working and living conditions represented among politicians, with a specific focus on gender and age. We then examine experiences of work-family conflict and subjective well-being, and investigate how these outcomes are related to gender, age, and working and living conditions. The main findings show significant gender differences in working and living conditions, and substantially higher levels of work-family conflict among young female politicians.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
local politicians, gender and age, working and living conditions, work-family conflict, subjective well-being, Sweden
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148379 (URN)10.1080/1554477X.2019.1602992 (DOI)000471502700001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012-1733
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Bongard, R., Fors Connolly, F. & Johansson Sevä, I. (2019). Hur mår företagaren?: En rapport om välbefinnande och livstillfredsställelse. Stockholm: Företagarna
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur mår företagaren?: En rapport om välbefinnande och livstillfredsställelse
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Företagarna, 2019. p. 29
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159276 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-05-24Bibliographically approved
Fairbrother, M., Johansson Sevä, I. & Kulin, J. (2019). Political trust and the relationship between climate change beliefs and support for fossil fuel taxes: Evidence from a survey of 23 European countries. Global Environmental Change, 59, Article ID 102003.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political trust and the relationship between climate change beliefs and support for fossil fuel taxes: Evidence from a survey of 23 European countries
2019 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 59, article id 102003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taxes on fossil fuels could be a useful policy tool for governments seeking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, such taxes are politically challenging to introduce, as public opinion is usually hostile to them. Prior studies have found that attitudes toward carbon and other environmental taxes reflect not just people's beliefs and concerns about the problems these taxes address, but also their trust in their country's politicians and political system. Using multilevel models fitted to data collected in 2016 on 42,401 individuals in 23 European countries, we show for the first time that these two factors interact. Among Europeans who distrust their country's politicians, political parties, and parliament, or who live in countries with low levels of political trust, being aware and concerned about climate change is at most weakly associated with support for taxes on fossil fuels. Europeans with high political trust, on the other hand, tend to be much more supportive of fossil fuel taxes if they also believe in the reality and dangers of anthropogenic climate change. Cross-nationally, the nations whose populations are most supportive of higher taxes on fossil fuels are not those that are more aware and concerned about climate change; rather, they are those with the highest levels of political trust.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Environmental attitudes, Carbon tax, Climate change, Political trust, European Social Survey, Multilevel model
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164690 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2019.102003 (DOI)2-s2.0-85073954553 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 01143Wallenberg Foundations, 2014.0034Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-2035:1
Available from: 2019-10-28 Created: 2019-10-28 Last updated: 2019-11-04Bibliographically approved
Kulin, J. & Johansson Sevä, I. (2019). The Role of Government in Protecting the Environment: Quality of Government and the Translation of Normative Views about Government Responsibility into Spending Preferences. International Journal of Sociology, 49(2), 110-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Government in Protecting the Environment: Quality of Government and the Translation of Normative Views about Government Responsibility into Spending Preferences
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0020-7659, E-ISSN 1557-9336, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 110-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While it is becoming increasingly evident that environmental problems such as climate change and global warming constitute existential threats to human societies, these problems will very likely per- sist and even intensify unless governments enact effective and potentially costly environmental poli- cies. However, government policies and spending ultimately rely on public support, thus underscoring the need to increase present knowledge about the processes underlying citizens' policy attitudes. In this study, we focus on the relationship between citizens' normative views about govern- ment responsibility and their support for government spending on the environment. While people who think that, as a general principle, it ought to be the government's responsibility to protect the environment should be more likely to support increasing government spending on the environment, we argue that this relationship is dependent on the quality of government. Using multilevel analysis and data from the most recent ISSP “Role of Government” module, we show that people who think that it is the government's responsibility to protect the environment are more likely to support increasing government spending on the environment in countries where government institutions are fair, effective, and non-corrupt. This suggests that the role of government in protecting the environment stretches far beyond designing effective environmental policies, since an overall ineffective and corrupt government appears to undermine public support for critical environmental policymaking. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
environmental protection, government responsibility, ISSP, quality of government (QoG), spending attitudes
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158629 (URN)10.1080/00207659.2019.1582964 (DOI)000469854400003 ()
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2014.0034
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Johansson Sevä, I. & Kulin, J. (2018). A Little More Action, Please: Increasing the Understanding about Citizens’ Lack of Commitment to Protecting the Environment in Different National Contexts. International Journal of Sociology, 48(4), 314-339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Little More Action, Please: Increasing the Understanding about Citizens’ Lack of Commitment to Protecting the Environment in Different National Contexts
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0020-7659, E-ISSN 1557-9336, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 314-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study advances the current understanding of why many citizens do not display a high level of commitment to protecting the environment. We examine cross-national differences in the salience of attitudinal and behavioral profiles distinguished by their comparably low levels of pro-environmental behavior, in both the public and private spheres. Based on theories of postmaterialism and collective action problems, we expect gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and levels of generalized trust to be related to the salience of these attitudinal and behavioral profiles cross-nationally. First, low levels of GDP very likely constrain pro-environmental behavior through decreasing environmental concern, which should increase the probability of citizens displaying an attitudinal and behavioral profile characterized by low levels of both environmental concern and pro-environmental behavior. Second, collective action problems in low-trust countries should also constrain behavior by undermining the propensity of environmentally concerned individuals to act on their concerns, which should increase the probability of citizens displaying a profile characterized by low levels of pro-environmental behavior despite high levels of concern. Using latent class analysis and multilevel modeling, we analyze data from the International Social Survey Programme (2010) and show that the probability of individuals displaying these profiles is clearly linked to GDP and national levels of generalized trust, in the expected manner. In contrast to previous research, we demonstrate that these societal factors are complementary insofar as they relate to fundamentally different individual-level processes underlying pro-environmental behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
pro-environmental behavior, environmental concern, GDP per capita, generalized trust, International Social Survey Programme (ISSP)
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155906 (URN)10.1080/00207659.2018.1515703 (DOI)000470273700002 ()
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2014.0034
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Högberg, B., Strandh, M., Baranowska-Rataj, A. & Johansson Sevä, I. (2018). Ageing, health inequalities and the welfare state: a multilevel analysis. Journal of European Social Policy, 28(4), 311-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing, health inequalities and the welfare state: a multilevel analysis
2018 (English)In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Comparative studies of health inequalities have largely neglected age and ageing aspects, while ageing research has often paid little attention to questions of social inequalities. This article investigates cross-country differences in gradients in self-rated health and limiting long-standing illness (LLSI) in middle-aged and in older people (aged 50–64 and 65–80 years) linked to social class, and degrees to which the social health gradients are associated with minimum pension levels and expenditure on elderly care. For these purposes, data from the European Social Survey (2002–2010) are analysed using multilevel regression techniques. We find significant cross-level interaction effects between class and welfare policies: higher expenditure on elderly care and particularly more generous minimum pensions are associated with smaller health inequalities in the older age group (65–80 years). It is concluded that welfare policies moderate the association between social class and health, highlighting the importance of welfare state efforts for older persons, who are strongly reliant on the welfare state and welfare state arrangements such as pensions and care policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
health equity, LLSI, social class, social gradient, subjective health
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143461 (URN)10.1177/0958928717739234 (DOI)000445639900001 ()
Funder
Welfare and Life-course
Available from: 2018-01-01 Created: 2018-01-01 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Hjerm, M., Johansson Sevä, I. & Werner, L. (2018). How critical thinking, multicultural education and teacher qualification affect anti-immigrant attitudes. International Studies in Sociology of Education, 27(1), 42-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How critical thinking, multicultural education and teacher qualification affect anti-immigrant attitudes
2018 (English)In: International Studies in Sociology of Education, ISSN 0962-0214, E-ISSN 1747-5066, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 42-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies identify a relationship between education and anti-immigrant attitudes. There is, however, uncertainty regarding the underlying explanations linking education to attitudes. In this article, we examine whether a relationship exists between exposure to teaching about critical thinking as well as multiculturalism (measured as religions/cultures as well as xenophobia/racism), and anti-immigrant attitudes among adolescents. In addition, we examine whether teacher qualification matters for attitudes. The analysis is based on survey data collected from high school students in Sweden. The results show an association between exposure to teaching about critical thinking as well as multiculturalism (both indicators) and anti-immigrant attitudes among students, i.e. higher exposure is related to lower levels of anti-immigrant attitudes. However, we find that teaching about xenophobia/racism affects attitudes, but not when simultaneously controlling for teaching about critical thinking and religions/cultures. In terms of teacher qualification, we find that students in schools with a high proportion of certified teachers tend to have lower levels of anti-immigrant attitudes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
anti-immigrant attitudes, education, critical thinking, multicultural education, teacher qualification, Sweden
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145047 (URN)10.1080/09620214.2018.1425895 (DOI)000428517200004 ()
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved
Projects
European Social Survey round 5 (ESS 5) [In09-0483:1-E_RJ]; Umeå UniversityMaterial resources and attitudes among self-employed [P10-0411:1_RJ]; Umeå UniversityWelfare opinion 2017 [2016-00255_Forte]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3349-5778

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