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Hörnberg, Greger
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Ramqvist, P. H. & Hörnberg, G. (2015). Burial mounds as settlement indicators: archaeological and palynological investigations at Sangis, northern Sweden. Fennoscandia Archaeologica, XXXII, 121-138
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burial mounds as settlement indicators: archaeological and palynological investigations at Sangis, northern Sweden
2015 (English)In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXXII, p. 121-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Grave mounds established during the 1st millennium AD in northern Sweden are common in central Norrland, up to northern Ångermanland. There are, however, two grave mounds located 350 km further north, close to the villages of Sangis and Espinära, that stand out as anomalies. These mounds rise questions regarding who established them and why? We hypothesised that they were established close to sedentary settlements, just as the ones found further south. To identify old settlement remains and traces of ancient land use, an archaeological excavation was performed of the sand ridge where the Sangis grave mound is located, and a palynological study was conducted to identify local vegetation changes. The results show that no sedentary settlement accompanied the mound. The area had, however, two phases of land use; as an occasionally visited site from calAD 600 to 800 when the grave mound and possibly a cooking pit was established, and; from calAD 1070 when human impact on the ridge restarted, probably associated to permanent settlements nearby.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: The archaeological society of Finland, 2015
Keywords
cooking pit, forging, grave mound, permanent settlement, northernmost Sweden
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112833 (URN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2015-12-15 Created: 2015-12-15 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Ramqvist, P. H. & Hörnberg, G. (2014). The history of early cereal cultivation in northernmost Fennoscandia as indicated by palynological research. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 23(6), 821-840
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The history of early cereal cultivation in northernmost Fennoscandia as indicated by palynological research
2014 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 821-840Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The age of the introduction of cereal cultivation in northern Europe has long been debated by researchers from many disciplines, in particular archaeology and palaeoecology. Over the past 40 years extensive palynological data have been collected concerning pre-industrial land use in northern Fennoscandia. This paper reviews palynological studies that include records of fossil cereal pollen from northernmost Sweden, Finland and Norway at latitudes north of 63A degrees N. The geographical extent of known early cultivation sites is constantly expanding, with more than 100 records of cereal pollen pre-dating ad 1700. The oldest records of scattered cereal pollen derive from Neolithic times. Periods of continuous cultivation, indicated by cereal pollen recorded recurrently in the sediment profiles, derive from the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. Collectively, the reviewed pollen records indicate that cereal cultivation was first introduced into areas close to the coast and later to the interior, and that it may have been practiced locally long before sedentary settlements based on intensive cultivation were established during medieval times. The data do not indicate a latitudinal spread of cultivation from south to north. However, methodological problems relating to pollen morphology of cereals, site characteristics and lack of connections to archaeologically excavated sites imply that the value of many early cereal pollen finds remains unclear. To increase our understanding of the context in which cereal cultivation was introduced in northernmost Fennoscandia, multidisciplinary studies integrating palaeoecology, archaeology and history are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2014
Keywords
Pollen, Cerealia, Hordeum, Agriculture, Land use, Scandinavia, Fennoscandia
National Category
Agricultural Science Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95258 (URN)10.1007/s00334-014-0446-2 (DOI)000342486400014 ()
Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-10-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hörnberg, G., Staland, H., Nordström, E.-M., Korsman, T. & Segerström, U. (2012). Fire as an important factor for the genesis of boreal Picea abies swamp forests in Fennoscandia. The Holocene, 22(2), 203-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fire as an important factor for the genesis of boreal Picea abies swamp forests in Fennoscandia
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2012 (English)In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 203-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The initial establishment of Picea abies in Sweden and Norway on a landscape level, between 3000 and 1000 years ago, was often preceded by recurrent fire and thereafter the influence of fire decreased. However, in some swamp forests, the absence of fire over the last 3500 years has promoted the continuous presence of deciduous trees, i.e. Picea has not established although it has been present regionally for over 3000 years. Our objective was to study long-term vegetation development and fire history in a Picea swamp forest located close (c. 600 m) to a deciduous swamp forest with a documented fire-free history in northernmost Sweden. The study included analyses of charred particles, pollen and ignition residues. Principal component analysis was applied to identify major changes in the pollen spectra. Our results showed that the current Picea swamp forest has developed from a deciduous fen and that fires affected the fen between 6700 and 2300 cal. yr BP. Picea abies established on the fen around 2200 cal. yr BP, following the last local on-site fire. The main factors responsible for the local vegetation development have been: fire (6700 to 2300 cal. yr BP); autogenous processes and climate (2300 to 1000 cal. yr BP); autogenous processes or anthropogenic impact (1000 to 300 cal. yr BP); anthropogenic impact through selective cutting and grazing (300 to 100 cal. yr BP); and autogenous processes and grazing (100 cal. yr BP to present). We conclude that fire facilitated the initial Picea abies establishment. Once established, Picea abies created local conditions that in combination with a colder and wetter climate prevented fire and the establishment of other tree species.

Keywords
charred particles, fire history, loss-on-ignition, pollen, succession
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-52200 (URN)10.1177/0959683611414936 (DOI)000298746900007 ()
Available from: 2012-02-13 Created: 2012-02-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, T., Hörnberg, G. & Östlund, L. (2009). Long-term human impact and vegetation changes in a boreal forest reserve: implications for the use of protected areas as ecological references. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 12(6), 1017-1036
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term human impact and vegetation changes in a boreal forest reserve: implications for the use of protected areas as ecological references
2009 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1017-1036Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Northern boreal forest reserves that display no signs of modern forest exploitation are often regarded as pristine and are frequently used as ecological reference areas for conservation and restoration. However, the long-term effects of human utilization of such forests are rarely investigated. Therefore, using both paleoecological and archaeological methods, we analyzed temporal and spatial gradients of long-term human impact in a large old-growth forest reserve in the far north of Sweden, comparing vegetational changes during the last millennium at three sites with different land use histories. Large parts of the forest displayed no visible signs of past human land use, and in an area with no recognized history of human land use the vegetation composition appears to have been relatively stable throughout the studied period. However, at two locations effects of previous land use could be distinguished extending at least four centuries back in time. Long-term, but low-intensity, human land use, including cultivation, reindeer herding and tree cutting, has clearly generated an open forest structure with altered species composition in the field layer at settlement sites and in the surrounding forest. Our analysis shows that past human land use created a persistent legacy that is still visible in the present forest ecosystem. This study highlights the necessity for ecologists to incorporate a historical approach to discern underlying factors that have caused vegetational changes, including past human activity. It also indicates that the intensity and spatial distribution of human land use within the landscape matrices of any forests should be assessed before using them as ecological references. The nomenclature of vascular plants follows Krok and Almquist (Svensk flora. Fanerogamer och ormbunksvaxter, 2001).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2009
Keywords
forest ecosystem, disturbance, nature reserve, land use, native people, pollen analysis, interdisciplinary studies, forest history
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-115974 (URN)10.1007/s10021-009-9276-y (DOI)000270339300012 ()
Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Carcaillet, C., Bergman, I., Delorme, S., Hörnberg, G. & Zackrisson, O. (2007). Long-term fire frequency not linked to prehistoric occupations in northern Swedish boreal forest. Ecology, 88, 465-477
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term fire frequency not linked to prehistoric occupations in northern Swedish boreal forest
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2007 (English)In: Ecology, Vol. 88, p. 465-477Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6200 (URN)
Available from: 2007-12-07 Created: 2007-12-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Liedgren, L., Bergman, I., Hörnberg, G., Zackrisson, O., Hellberg, E., Östlund, L. & DeLuca, T. (2007). Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric hearths in alpine northern Sweden: problems and possibilities. Journal of Archaeological Sciences, 34, 1276-1288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric hearths in alpine northern Sweden: problems and possibilities
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Sciences, Vol. 34, p. 1276-1288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6204 (URN)
Available from: 2007-12-07 Created: 2007-12-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hörnberg, G., Bohlin, E., Hellberg, E., Bergman, I., Zackrisson, O., Olofsson, A., . . . Påsse, T. (2006). Effects of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers on local vegetation in a non-uniform glacio-isostatic land uplift area, northern Sweden. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers on local vegetation in a non-uniform glacio-isostatic land uplift area, northern Sweden
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2006 (English)In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6160 (URN)
Available from: 2007-12-06 Created: 2007-12-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bergman, I., Olofsson, A., Hörnberg, G., Zackrisson, O. & Hellberg, E. (2004). Deglaciation and colonization: Pioneer settlements in northern Fennoscandia. Journal of world prehistory, 18(2), 155-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deglaciation and colonization: Pioneer settlements in northern Fennoscandia
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2004 (English)In: Journal of world prehistory, ISSN 0892-7537, E-ISSN 1573-7802, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 155-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present new data on Early Mesolithic settlements in northern Sweden and discuss the process of pioneer colonization. A new set of radiocarbon dates from archaeological sites push deglaciation of northern Fennoscandia further back in time and demonstrate the rapid arrival of pioneer settlers. Environmental data reveal a highly productive early postglacial setting with plant communities unmatched in present ecosystems. The chronological and technological setting supports immigration from the north and northwest with pioneers relying on a long history of enculturating northern subarctic landscapes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Plenum, 2004
Keywords
Deglaciation, pioneer, colonization, landscape knowledge, fennoscandia
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6149 (URN)10.1007/s10963-004-2880-z (DOI)
Available from: 2007-12-11 Created: 2007-12-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Bergman, I., Påsse, T., Olofsson, A., Zachrisson, O., Hörnberg, G., Hellberg, E. & Bohlin, E. (2003). Isostatic land uplift and Mesolithic landscapes: lake tilting, a key to the discovery of Mesolithic sites in the interior of Northern Sweden. Journal of Archaeological Science, 30(11), 1451-1458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isostatic land uplift and Mesolithic landscapes: lake tilting, a key to the discovery of Mesolithic sites in the interior of Northern Sweden
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2003 (English)In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 30, no 11, p. 1451-1458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Until recently only a few Mesolithic sites were known from the interior of N. Sweden, although extensive archaeological surveys have been carried out since the 1950s. The lack of archaeological data made every attempt to interpret the process of pioneer colonization quite fruitless. In this paper we present a model of non-uniform glacio-isostatic uplift and lake-tilting used to identify potential areas of Mesolithic habitation. By reconstructing shoreline displacement of ancient lakes, archaeological, palaeoecological and geological studies have resulted in the discovery of a significant number of Mesolithic sites and of an early post-glacial landscape previously unknown.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2003
Keywords
Mesolithic, Pioneer, Deglaciation, Glacio-isostatic uplift, Lake-tilting, Shore-level displacement, Fennoscandia
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-2230 (URN)10.1016/S0305-4403(03)00040-2 (DOI)
Available from: 2003-09-25 Created: 2003-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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