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Emmelin, Maria
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Publications (10 of 74) Show all publications
Khatami, A., Emmelin, M., Talaee, R., Mohammadi, A. M., Aghazadeh, N., Firooz, A. & Stenberg, B. (2018). Lived experiences of patients suffering from acute Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis: A qualitative content analysis study from Iran. Iranian Journal of Arthropod-Borne Diseases, 12(2), 180-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lived experiences of patients suffering from acute Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis: A qualitative content analysis study from Iran
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2018 (English)In: Iranian Journal of Arthropod-Borne Diseases, ISSN 1735-7179, E-ISSN 2008-2517, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 180-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of patients who suffer from acute cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran, focusing on quality of life.

Methods: The study was conducted at two different sites in Iran in 2010–2011. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with six men and six women parasitologically confirmed acute cutaneous leishmaniasis. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and translated into English. Qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis.

Results: The participants, aged 23 to 63yr, had mild to severe disease. Based on the analysis four main themes were developed. "Fearing an agonizing disease" reflects patients' experiences of disease development resulting in sadness and depression, "struggling to cope" and "taking on the blame" both illustrate how patients experience living with the disease, which included both felt and enacted stigma as major social concerns. "Longing for being seen and heard" refers to patients' experiences with healthcare as well as their expectations and demands from communities and healthcare to be involved in closing the knowledge and awareness gap.

Conclusion: Mental and social dimensions of cutaneous leishmaniasis were complex and adversely affected patients' lives by causing psychological burden and limiting their social interactions. Health authorities have to plan programs to increase the disease awareness to prevent the existing stigma to improve patients' social condition and medical care.

Keywords
Cutaneous leishmaniasis, Qualitative research, Quality of life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150629 (URN)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-05-22Bibliographically approved
Dalmar, A. A., Hussein, A. S., Walhad, S. A., Ibrahim, A. O., Abdi, A. A., Ali, M. K., . . . Wall, S. (2017). Rebuilding research capacity in fragile states: the case of a Somali-Swedish global health initiative. Global Health Action, 10(1), Article ID 1348693.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rebuilding research capacity in fragile states: the case of a Somali-Swedish global health initiative
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2017 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1348693Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents an initiative to revive the previous Somali-Swedish Research Cooperation, which started in 1981 and was cut short by the civil war in Somalia. A programme focusing on research capacity building in the health sector is currently underway through the work of an alliance of three partner groups: six new Somali universities, five Swedish universities, and Somali diaspora professionals. Somali ownership is key to the sustainability of the programme, as is close collaboration with Somali health ministries. The programme aims to develop a model for working collaboratively across regions and cultural barriers within fragile states, with the goal of creating hope and energy. It is based on the conviction that health research has a key role in rebuilding national health services and trusted institutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Diaspora, Somalia, fragile states, health research training, health systems
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138141 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2017.1348693 (DOI)000407952800001 ()28799463 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-14 Created: 2017-08-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Köhler, M., Rosvall, M. & Emmelin, M. (2016). "All is well": professionals' documentation of social determinants of health in Swedish Child Health Services health records concerning maltreated children - a mixed method approach. BMC Pediatrics, 16, Article ID 127.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"All is well": professionals' documentation of social determinants of health in Swedish Child Health Services health records concerning maltreated children - a mixed method approach
2016 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Knowledge about social determinants of health has influenced global health strategies, including early childhood interventions. Some psychosocial circumstances - such as poverty, parental mental health problems, abuse and partner violence - increase the risk of child maltreatment and neglect. Healthcare professionals' awareness of psychosocial issues is of special interest, since they both have the possibility and the obligation to identify vulnerable children.

METHODS: Child Health Services health records of 100 children in Malmö, Sweden, who had been placed in, or were to be placed in family foster care, were compared with health records of a matched comparison group of 100 children who were not placed in care. A mixed-method approach integrating quantitative and qualitative analysis was applied.

RESULTS: The documentation about the foster care group was more voluminous than for the comparison group. The content was problem-oriented and dominated by severe parental health and social problems, while the child's own experiences were neglected. The professionals documented interaction with healthcare and social functions, but very few reports to the Social Services were noted. For both groups, notes about social structures were almost absent.

CONCLUSIONS: Child Health Service professionals facing vulnerable children document parental health issues and interaction with healthcare, but they fail to document living conditions thereby making social structures invisible in the health records. The child perspective is insufficiently integrated in the documentation and serious child protection needs remain unmet, if professionals avoid reporting to Social Services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Children, Child Health Services, Health records, Family foster care, Social determinants of health, Child maltreatment, Children's rights
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127503 (URN)10.1186/s12887-016-0646-2 (DOI)000381353400001 ()27526796 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Karim, K. M., Emmelin, M., Lindberg, L. & Wamala, S. (2016). Gender and Women Development Initiatives in Bangladesh: A Study of Rural Mother Center. Journal of Health & Social Policy, 31(5), 369-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and Women Development Initiatives in Bangladesh: A Study of Rural Mother Center
2016 (English)In: Journal of Health & Social Policy, ISSN 0897-7186, E-ISSN 1937-190X, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 369-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women-focused development initiatives have become a controversial issue connected with women's health and welfare. Previous studies indicated that development initiatives might increase women's workload, family conflict, and marital violence. This study explored the gendered characteristics of a development initiative Rural Mother Center in Bangladesh. Data incorporated policy document and interviews of social workers working with the mother centers in two northwest subdistricts. The qualitative content analysis of data emerged a general theme of expanding women's responsibility while maintaining male privilege explaining gendered design and practice of the development initiative. The theme was supported by two gendered categories related to the design: (a) essentializing women's participation; (b) maintaining traditional gender, and four categories related to the practice; (c) inadequate gender knowledge and skills; (d) reinforcing traditional gender; (e) using women for improving office performance; and (f) upholding male privilege. The study suggests that though women-focused development initiatives need to be embraced with gender-redistributive policies, the social workers should be trained for attaining gender-transformative motivation and competencies.

Keywords
Gender, women development, development practice, Bangladesh
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127501 (URN)10.1080/19371918.2015.1137517 (DOI)000380147000004 ()27149647 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Canivet, C., Bodin, T., Emmelin, M., Toivanen, S., Moghaddassi, M. & Östergren, P.-O. (2016). Precarious employment is a risk factor for poor mental health in young individuals in Sweden: a cohort study with multiple follow-ups. BMC Public Health, 16, Article ID 687.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Precarious employment is a risk factor for poor mental health in young individuals in Sweden: a cohort study with multiple follow-ups
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2016 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 687Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The globalisation of the economy and the labour markets has resulted in a growing proportion of individuals who find themselves in a precarious labour market situation, especially among the young. This pertains also to the Nordic countries, despite their characterisation as well developed welfare states with active labour market policies. This should be viewed against the background of a number of studies, which have shown that several aspects of precarious employment are detrimental to mental health. However, longitudinal studies from the Nordic region that examine the impact of precarious labour market conditions on mental health in young individuals are currently lacking. The present study aims to examine this impact in a general cohort of Swedish young people.

METHODS: Postal questionnaires were sent out in 1999/2000 to a stratified random sample of the Scania population, Sweden; the response rate was 58 %. All of those who responded at baseline were invited to follow-ups after 5 and 10 years. Employment precariousness was determined based on detailed questions about present employment, previous unemployment, and self-rated risk of future unemployment. Mental health was assessed by GHQ-12. For this study individuals in the age range of 18-34 years at baseline, who were active in the labour market (employed or seeking job) and had submitted complete data from 1999/2000, 2005, and 2010 on employment precariousness and mental health status, were selected (N = 1135).

RESULTS: Forty-two percent of the participants had a precarious employment situation at baseline. Labour market trajectories that included precarious employment in 1999/2000 or 2005 predicted poor mental health in 2010: the incidence ratio ratio was 1.4 (95 % CI: 1.1-2.0) when excluding all individuals with mental health problems at baseline and adjusting for age, gender, social support, social capital, and economic difficulties in childhood. The population attributable fraction regarding poor mental health in the studied age group was 18 %.

CONCLUSIONS: This study supported the hypothesis that precarious employment should be regarded as an important social determinant for subsequent development of mental health problems in previously mentally healthy young people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Unemployment, Stress, Psychological, Young adult, Employment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127502 (URN)10.1186/s12889-016-3358-5 (DOI)000381004300007 ()27485322 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-14 Created: 2016-11-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindvall, K., Jenkins, P., Scribani, M., Emmelin, M., Larsson, C., Norberg, M. & Weinehall, L. (2015). Comparisons of weight change, eating habits and physical activity between women in Northern Sweden and Rural New York State-results from a longitudinal study. Nutrition Journal, 14, Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparisons of weight change, eating habits and physical activity between women in Northern Sweden and Rural New York State-results from a longitudinal study
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2015 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 14, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79582 (URN)10.1186/s12937-015-0078-0 (DOI)000360332300001 ()26319494 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in submitted form, with the title "Comparisons of weight change, eating habits and physical activity between Swedish and US women : implications for the obesity epidemic".

Available from: 2013-08-26 Created: 2013-08-26 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Laisser, R., Nyström, L. & Emmelin, M. (2014). Health-care workers' attitudes and perceptions of intimate partner violence agains women in Tanzania. African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health, 8(1), 28-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-care workers' attitudes and perceptions of intimate partner violence agains women in Tanzania
2014 (English)In: African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health, ISSN 1759-7374, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A cross-sectional survey of 345 health-care workers and 312 students was conducted to explore attitudes and perceptions of intimate partner violence against women, and their views on care and prevention. All health-care workers and final-year students were included in the study. Students' t-test was followed in the analysis using SPPSS computer program. Forty-three percent of female health-care workers recognised acts of controlling behaviour, while 68% of female students agreed to less than one statement justifying physical violence and 32% of men failed to recognise a woman's right to refuse sex. Ninety percent of both students and health-care workers had observed clients having unexplained feelings of sadness or loss of confidence. Between 45 and 70% of students and health-care workers believed that women exposed to violence were difficult to support. The study clearly indicates a need for adequate health-care resources, guidelines and training to influence a change of existing rigid gender norms.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98146 (URN)
Available from: 2015-01-20 Created: 2015-01-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nordyke, K., Rosén, A., Emmelin, M. & Ivarsson, A. (2014). Internalizing the threat of risk: a qualitative study about adolescents' experience living with screening-detected celiac disease 5 years after diagnosis. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 12, Article ID 91.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internalizing the threat of risk: a qualitative study about adolescents' experience living with screening-detected celiac disease 5 years after diagnosis
2014 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 12, article id 91Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Mass screening could identify those with unrecognized celiac disease (CD), but the experience of being detected through screening and living with screening-detected CD should be explored before considering this as acceptable intervention. For this study we invited screening-detected adolescents to describe their experience living with screening-detected CD five years after diagnosis with the aim to explore how their perceptions, practices, and beliefs evolved.

METHODS: Adolescents who were diagnosed through a population-based CD screening were invited to write narratives after being diagnosed. Of 153 adolescents who were eventually diagnosed through the screening, 91 wrote narratives one year after diagnosis and 72 five years after diagnosis. A qualitative content analysis resulted in a theme and categories that describe the experience living with screening-detected CD five years after diagnosis.

RESULTS: The overall theme - "Internalizing the threat of risk" - illustrates that being detected through screening and the internalized threat of future health complications have impacted how these adolescents felt about the diagnosis, coped with the gluten-free diet (GFD), and thought about CD screening. This theme is supported by four categories: maintaining an imposed disease identity describes how they continued to define their diagnosis in relation to the screening. They also expressed moving from forced food changes to adapted diet routines by describing habits, routines, coping strategies, and the financial burden of the GFD. They had enduring beliefs of being spared negative consequences, however, even after five years, some doubted they had CD and worried that being detected and eating a GFD might not be beneficial, i.e. "continuing to fear it is "all in vain".

CONCLUSIONS: There was maintenance and evolution in the perceptions, practices, and beliefs of the adolescents after five years. Some have adjusted to the disease and adapted new habits and coping strategies to deal with the GFD, while others still doubt they have CD or that being detected was beneficial. The transition to adapting to the disease and GFD is ongoing, illustrating the importance of providing ongoing support for those with screening-detected CD as they adjust to this chronic disease and the GFD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Adolescents, Celiac disease, Gluten-free diet, Narratives, Qualitative research, Screening
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81688 (URN)10.1186/1477-7525-12-91 (DOI)000338314500001 ()24915870 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved
Hayati, E. N., Emmelin, M. & Eriksson, M. (2014). We no longer live in the old days: a qualitative study on men's views on masculinity and violence within marriage in rural Java, Indonesia. BMC Women's Health, 14(58)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>We no longer live in the old days: a qualitative study on men's views on masculinity and violence within marriage in rural Java, Indonesia
2014 (English)In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 14, no 58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies on domestic violence in Indonesia have focused primarily on women's experiences and little research has been undertaken to understand men's views on domestic violence or their involvement in the prevention of domestic violence. This study aimed to explore men's views on masculinity and the use of violence within marriage, in order to gain knowledge on how to involve men in prevention of domestic violence in rural Indonesia. Methods: Focus group discussions with six groups of local male community leaders in Purworejo were conducted. The discussions were transcribed and coded for the construction of a positional map on different masculinities and their relation to the level of acceptance of domestic violence. Results: Social and cultural changes have played a crucial role in transforming the relationship between men and women in Indonesian society. Three different positions of masculinity with certain beliefs on the gender order and acceptance of violence within marriage were identified: the traditionalist, the pragmatist, and the egalitarian. The traditionalist had the highest acceptance of violence as a tool to uphold the superior position of men within marriage, while the pragmatist viewed violence as undesirable but sometimes needed in order to correct the wife's behavior. The egalitarian did not see any reason for violence because they believed that men and women are equal and complementary to each other. Conclusions: Adaptation to social and cultural changes combined with lack of exposures to contextual and progressive religious teachings has led to the formation of three different positions of masculinity among the population in this study. Each position has certain beliefs regarding the gender order and the use of violence within marriage. Religion is an extremely important aspect that must be included in every type of intervention with this population.

Keywords
domestic violence, masculinity, positional map, Indonesia
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-82694 (URN)10.1186/1472-6874-14-58 (DOI)000335252100001 ()
Available from: 2013-11-06 Created: 2013-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Dahlgren, L. & Emmelin, M. (2013). Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?. In: Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi (Ed.), Social capital and rural development in the knowledge society : (pp. 273-298). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?
2013 (English)In: Social capital and rural development in the knowledge society / [ed] Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 273-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science series
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81344 (URN)9781782540595 (ISBN)9781782540601 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-10-07 Created: 2013-10-07 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
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